Unfounded rumors only add to Joey Votto's burden

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When I saw the story, I almost decided to ignore it. Better to pretend
it wasn’t there than to give it any credence. But then I figured
something needed to be said.

In case you didn’t know, there have been rumors floating around
regarding Cincinnati Reds first baseman Joey Votto’s trip to the
disabled list. Before returning to action tonight, Votto had been out with what was officially termed “an undisclosed stress-related issue.”

It’s a lame, mysterious description, for sure. And whenever we are
confronted with lame, mysterious information, what do we do? We become
a sewing circle, or a bunch of old dudes in a barber shop. We gossip.
We speculate. By we, I mean all of us. Fans, writers, journalists,
bloggers. Everyone.

The speculation got personal. The innuendo invasive. The word on the message board/blogosphere was that Votto is gay.

No proof. Just some twisted logic: Votto + stress = gay baseball player. To which I say two things:

1. No one should believe such words unless Joey Votto utters them himself.

2. Even if he does, who cares? Does it matter in the least?

If a gay athlete wants to come out of the closet, let him do so —
on his own. He should never be forced to come forth simply to answer
rumors.

And a straight athlete shouldn’t be put in a position where he feels the need to say “I’m not gay … not that there’s anything wrong with that.”

Because there isn’t anything wrong with it. But it’s personal. And it’s nobody’s business.

As writer Jeff Pearlman, a man far more eloquent than myself, put it …

A ballplayer should come out because it’s important for America to
see that gay does not mean weird or freaky or diseased. But nobody
needs to be forced out via rumor and innuendo. It’s not fair and it’s
not righteous.

I can only hope that Votto didn’t feel the need to answer the rumors when he came forth on Tuesday with incredibly personal details about his absence.

Votto said that he has struggled dealing with the death of his father
in August. He was distracted by baseball, but when he went on the DL in
May with an upper respiratory infection, he became overwhelmed, and the
emotions of his loss came crashing down. He struggled with depression,
anxiety and panic attacks. He saw doctors. He called 911 in the middle
of the night for a trip to the hospital. Finally, he couldn’t take it
anymore.

“It finally seeped its way into the game. I just had to put an end
to it. I really couldn’t be out there. It’s difficult to explain what I
was going through. I couldn’t do it. I physically couldn’t do my job.
That’s what I’ve gone through.

Votto spoke of his love for his father, and the stress of being the
oldest son and feeling as though he was now responsible for his family.
He said the pressure was so great, he felt like he “was going to die.”

It would be a terrible ordeal for anyone to deal with, let alone a public figure, a man who lives in the spotlight.

There is no need for any of us to add to it.

Astros extend winning streak to 11 games

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The Astros rallied late to keep their winning streak alive, extending it to 11 games with a 7-4 victory over the Royals on Sunday afternoon. The club is now 48-25, leading the Mariners by a full game in the AL West.

The Royals took a 4-2 lead after three innings, but Brian McCann knocked in a run with a single in the top of the fourth to cut the deficit to one run. Carlos Correa hit a game-tying solo home run in the eighth. The Astros kept their foot on the gas, scoring two more runs on RBI singles from Evan Gattis and Marwin Gonzalez in the top of the eighth and another in the top of the ninth on Correa’s sacrifice fly.

Starter Lance McCullers allowed four runs (two earned) on six hits and two walks with nine strikeouts over six innings. Tony Sipp worked a scoreless seventh. Ken Giles did the same in the eighth. Hector Rondon finished off the win in the ninth, working around a one-out walk with a game-ending double play.

After winning all 10 games on their road trip against the Rangers, Athletics, and Royals, the Astros will head home for a nine-game homestand against the Rays, Royals, and Blue Jays. Each club is below .500.