Thursday's thoughts: Hanigan seals his fate

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– You know Dusty Baker didn’t want to do it, but with Ramon Hernandez
getting a day off, Ryan Hanigan was moved up to the fifth spot against
the Braves. It was the first time this season that Hanigan, who entered
with a .395 OBP, hit higher than seventh. Most of his starts had come
from the eighth spot. Sure enough, Hanigan went on to clog up the bases
in three of his four plate appearances as the Reds were shut out by the
Braves. He’ll almost surely be benched or at least dropped in the
lineup on Friday.

– The Mariners could learn something from their rookie first
baseman: Mike Carp has walked twice in five plate appearances since his
callup Wednesday. His teammates have walked twice and fanned 21 times
in those two games.

– The Jays used seven relievers in their win over Phillies, and it
was the one that made his season debut, Jeremy Accardo, who earned the
save. Brandon League cost Jason Frasor the opportunity when he couldn’t
get through the eighth cleanly. Frasor ended up coming in to get the
final out of the eighth, but not before he allowed a game-tying single.
He then left with the pitcher’s spot in the order due up, but he
probably would have come out anyway, since the Phillies had Chase Utley
and Ryan Howard starting the ninth. B.J. Ryan took over with the Jays
back on top by one, retired one of the two and then made way for
Accardo, who allowed only a single while finishing up. It’s probably
not a sign of things to come, but Gaston did have the right idea in
playing matchups against the unbalanced Philly lineup.

– Ozzie Guillen will be second-guessed after pulling Gavin Floyd for
a pinch-hitter with the White Sox up 5-1 in the eighth. Floyd was at
just 90 pitches, and he hadn’t given up more than a single all day.
Scott Linebrink, with some help from a Chris Getz error, ended up
blowing the lead in the eighth, and the White Sox lost 6-5 in the
ninth.

– Let’s see just how cruel the baseball gods are: Chris Young was up
to .276/.400/.569 for the month before suffering a leg injury in the
midst of a 4-for-4 game against the Royals. He entered June at
.178/.220/.313 this season.

Zack Cozart thinks the way the Rays have been using Sergio Romo is bad for baseball

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The Rays started Sergio Romo on back-to-back days and if that sounds weird to you, you’re not alone. Romo, of course, was the star closer for the Giants for a while, helping them win the World Series in 2012 and ’14. He’s been a full-time reliever dating back to 2006, when he was at Single-A.

In an effort to prevent lefty Ryan Yarbrough from facing the righty-heavy top of the Angels’ lineup (Zack Cozart, Mike Trout, Justin Upton), Romo started Saturday’s game, pitching the first inning before giving way to Yarbrough in the second. Romo struck out the side, in fact. The Rays went on to win 5-3.

The Rays did it again on Sunday afternoon, starting Romo. This time, he got four outs before giving way to Matt Andriese. Romo walked two without giving up a hit while striking out three. The Angels managed to win 5-2 however.

Despite Sunday’s win, Cozart wasn’t a happy camper with the way the Rays used Romo. Via Fabian Ardaya of The Athletic, Cozart said, “It was weird … It’s bad for baseball, in my opinion … It’s spring training. That’s the best way to explain it.”

It’s difficult to see merit in Cozart’s argument. It’s not like the Rays were making excessive amounts of pitching changes; they used five on Saturday and four on Sunday. The games lasted three hours and three hours, 15 minutes, respectively. The average game time is exactly three hours so far this season. I’m having trouble wondering how else Cozart might mean the strategy is bad for baseball.

It seems like the real issue is that Cozart is afraid of the sport changing around him. The Rays, like most small market teams, have to find their edges in slight ways. The Rays aren’t doing this blindly; the strategy makes sense based on their opponents’ starting lineup. The idea of valuing on-base percentage was scoffed at. Shifting was scoffed at and now every team employs them to some degree. Who knows if starting a reliever for the first three or four outs will become a trend, but it’s shortsighted to write it off at first glance.