Baseball makes its pitch for the Olympics

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Four years ago,
baseball was told that, after 2008, its presence was neither requested
nor desired in the Olympics. Since then, the International Baseball
Federation has tried hard to get it back in. Today the IBAF made its pitch for 2016, and for what I think is the first time, got some concessions from Major League Baseball that may help its chances:

There would be no major league games on the day of the Olympic medal games.

There
would no MLB games broadcast at the times of Olympic Games, which means
Olympic baseball would create a schedule to have its games end before
MLB night games begin.

Even though MLB does not intend to stop
its season during the Olympics, there would be a “representative
number of the best players available (for the Games).”

The
International Baseball Federation would work with Olympic host cities
to finance construction and after-use costs of the two stadiums needed
for the five-day tournament, which would not be an issue for 2016
candidates Chicago and Tokyo, since they have stadiums.

There was
a sense in 2005 that the reason baseball (and softball) were axed from
the games was that they were too thoroughly dominated by America (see here).
That may have been true for softball — the U.S. women at the time were
unrivaled, and though that has changed somewhat since then, the
American women are still the best — but it was always a dubious claim
with respect to baseball given the high quality of Latin American and
east Asian teams. Many suspected that the decision was really a
cultural/political one, with IOC President Jacques Rogge taking what
was then a quite fashionable anti-American position. I don’t know if
that really was the case — people talked of the lack of
Olympic-quality drug testing in baseball at the time as another issue
too — but stranger things have happened with the Olympics.

The
announced concessions, however, seem not to address any
Olympic-specific problems with baseball. Rather, they seem to address
some of the criticisms voiced about the World Baseball Classic, where
the lack of participation by many of the best baseball players was seen
as a serious drawback (personally I think the injury risk is a bigger
drawback, but I’m not the biggest fan of international baseball, so
maybe I’m unique in that regard). If that was a concern, however, these
concessions don’t seem to do too terribly much to solve it. What
exactly does it mean that Major League Baseball will ensure that “a
representative number of the best players available” will play? How on
Earth could they do this? The 2016 Olympics will take place during the
height of the baseball season. Even if the games are played in Chicago
— one of the possible sites — I can’t see any team in contention
allowing their best players to go play for Team USA, Team Dominican
Republic, or Team Japan when so much is on the line in the regular
season. They can’t force them to participate, can they?

According
to this article, karate, roller sports, golf, rugby sevens, softball
and squash also are seeking spots on the program, and no more than two
of them will be chosen. If baseball in the Olympics means that my team
is going to lose its shortstop or setup man for a couple of weeks,
consider me rooting for squash.

Report: Six teams are in on Troy Tulowitzki

Troy Tulowitzki
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At least six teams are interested in free agent shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, according to a recent report from Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle. Known suitors include the Cubs, who will reportedly be in attendance during one of the shortstop’s offseason workouts as they decide whether or not to press forward with a deal.

The Blue Jays released Tulowitzki on Tuesday as general manager Ross Atkins admitted he couldn’t rely on the 34-year-old to bounce back from season-ending bone spur removal surgery and be the kind of consistent presence the club needed going forward. Toronto is expected to absorb the remaining $38 million on Tulowitzki’s contract, which includes the $20 million he’s due in 2019, another $14 million in 2020 and a $4 million buyout in 2021.

The veteran slugger will be available to any interested team at a minimum $600,000, an undeniably attractive bargain if he recovers in advance of the 2019 season. He last appeared in the majors in 2017 and slashed .249/.300/.378 with 17 extra-base hits and a .678 OPS through 260 PA. Per Slusser, Tulowitzki appears to be angling for a job with the Athletics — even going so far as to say he’d be willing to switch positions in order to play for a winning team — though they have yet to reach out about a potential deal this winter.