Potent quotables: Castillo and Bradley face the music

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“I have to catch that ball. The ball
was moving a little bit. I didn’t get it. I feel bad. It was a routine
fly ball. … I need to get it. … I feel so bad. I don’t want to make
any errors, so I feel bad about myself. I made a mistake — I feel bad.”

– Luis Castillo, at a loss to explain the epic drop that allowed the Yankees to win Friday night’s game.

“I just closed my eyes and swung.”

– Rick Porcello, on becoming the first Tigers’ pitcher to have a multi-RBI game
since Joe Coleman in 1972. He was 2-for-3 at the dish. The 2o-year-old
Porcello wasn’t that bad on the mound either, allowing just a single
run over seven innings to improve to 7-4 on the season.

“We’re trying to win ball games up
here. If they need to make a move to help the team out, I’m all for
that. Going to Triple-A is never news you want to hear but I’m going to
go down there and try to find out what I need to do to find myself.”

– Howie Kendrick reacts to his demotion
to Triple-A Salt Lake. The 25-year-old second baseman was hitting just
.231/.281/.355 with four homers and 22 RBI in 186 at-bats this season.

“I wasn’t embarrassed. I’ve done a
whole lot of things to be embarrassed about. That’s water under the
bridge. The run was going to score, the fan got a souvenir. Worst case
scenario.”

– Milton Bradley, after committing the Cardinal sin of throwing the ball into the stands with just two outs. By the way, this might be the most accurate thing Bradley has ever said.

“The difference in this game, with
these young pitchers we have, I don’t even know if they watch baseball,
to be honest with you.”

– Jason Giambi, commenting on the excellent pitchers duel
between Tim Lincecum and Athletics’ rookie Vin Mazzaro on Friday night.
Lincecum got the better of him on Friday, hurling a complete-game
shutout, but Mazzaro has a 1.37 over his first three big league starts.

The Yankees and Red Sox will both be wearing home whites for the London Series

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This summer’s series between the Yankees and Red Sox in London is, technically, a home series for the Red Sox, with the Yankees serving as the visitors. Pete Abraham reports that Major League Baseball is dispensing with the usual sartorial formalities, however, and will have both teams wearing their home livery: the Red Sox will wear white and the Yankees will wear pinstripes.

It’s marketing more than anything, as you can’t really put your league’s marquee franchise on an international stage and not have it wearing its iconic duds, right?

It’s also pretty harmless if you ask me. Baseball is not like football or basketball in which you have to have contrasting uniforms in order to keep one side from accidentally throwing the ball to the opposition or what have you. And with so many teams wearing solid color alternates now — sometimes both the home and road team are in blue or red jerseys in the same game — it’s not like there hasn’t already been a breakdown in home white/road gray orthodoxy. I prefer the classics, but I lost that battle a long time ago.

So: I say let a thousand colors fly. Heck, let the Yankees wear their pinstripes on the road all the time. Who’ll stop ’em?