Adenhart's driver was DUI too

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From the O.C. Register:

An autopsy report showed Courtney Frances Stewart had a
blood-alcohol content above the legal limit for someone her age when
the car she was driving was struck by an alleged drunken driver on
April 9, prosecutors said . . . Toxicology tests conducted by the
Orange County Coroner showed Stewart had a blood-alcohol content of
.06, said Deputy District Attorney Susan Price. The legal limit in
California for drivers under 21 is .01, while the limit for drivers 21
or older is .08.

There’s a self-serving quote from the defendant’s lawyer, in which he
says that this new information is “a big revelation.” Hardly. The fact
that Stewart was over the legal limit for people under 21 only means
that she could, if she were still alive, be charged with DUI. Her being
under the influence, however, does not mean that she did anything to
cause the crash, and for Gallo’s lawyer to push that defense would
require some evidence, beyond her mere BAC, that Stewart’s driving
contributed to the collision. The evidence that has been reported so
far, however, suggests that the driver of the other car, Andrew Gallo,
was driving at a high rate of speed and ran a red light while sporting
a blood-alcohol content of at least .19 (his reading two hours after
the crash). Jurors will be taking all of that into account. They won’t
simply look at the BAC levels of the drivers, throw their hands up in
the air and say “well, both were drunk, no harm, no foul.”

This same type of situation, you may already know, is at play in the Jim Leyritz case.
There, the driver who was killed was likewise over the legal limit.
Leyritz’s lawyer is apparently going to present evidence that her
driving, and not Leyritz’s, is what led to the accident. The BAC levels
will be relevant for that inquiry, but the matter of who ran the red
light and how they were otherwise driving is going to be far more
relevant.

Twins designate Phil Hughes for assignment

AP Photo/Ron Schwane
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Phil Hughes was officially designated for assignment by the Twins on Tuesday, the culmination of multiple injury-plagued seasons and poor performance.

Things couldn’t have started out much better for Hughes in Minnesota. The former Yankees hurler joined the Twins on a three-year, $24 million contract in December of 2013 and reeled off a 3.52 ERA over 32 starts during his first season with the club. He set the MLB record (which still stands, by the way) for single season strikeout-to-walk ratio and even received some downballot Cy Young Award consideration. The big year resulted in the two sides ripping up their previous agreement with a new five-year, $58 million deal, but it was all downhill after that.

Hughes took a step back with a 4.40 ERA in 2015 and struggled with a 5.95 ERA over 11 starts and one relief appearance in 2016 before undergoing surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome. He wasn’t any better upon his return last year, putting up a 5.87 ERA in nine starts and five relief appearances. Hughes missed time with a biceps issue and required a thoracic outlet revision surgery in August. He began this year on the disabled list with an oblique injury, only to put up a 6.75 ERA over two starts and five relief appearances before the Twins decided to turn the page this week.

Hughes is still owed the remainder of his $13.2 million salary for this year and another $13.2 million next year. The deal didn’t work out as anyone would have hoped, but unfortunately this is another case of health just not cooperating.