Yankee Stadium home run binge explained

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Looking for an explanation for all of the homers in Yankee Stadium? It’s the walls, stupid:

After analyzing the 29 games played and the 105 home runs hit at the
new Yankee Stadium, AccuWeather.com has determined that a portion of
the home run derby that has taken place this season cannot be directly
attributed to the weather. As it turns out, walls, not weather, are the
homer helpers for 19 percent of the home runs thus far in the new
Yankee Stadium.

The difference is in the dimensions. For someone attending a game at
the new Yankee Stadium, or watching on TV, the size of the playing
field appears to be the same. The dimensions at select corners of the
field are identical – and the posted numbers on the walls reflect that.
However, detailed schematics of the park reveal some nuances that have
significant implications.

Specifically, AccuWeather notes that the change from a curved to a flat
wall in right field to accommodate a new scoreboard causes the fence to
jog in between four and nine feet. As a result, AccuWeather calculates
that that 20 of the 105 home runs would not have flown out of the old
stadium. Over the course of the season, that will account for 56 homers
that would have fallen short of the fence in the old joint. That’s not
an insignificant number of home runs.

What to do about it? Well, returning the wall to Old Yankee Stadium
dimensions would require removing a couple of rows of seats, it would
seem, and if we know anything about the Yankees, we know that they’re
not about to sacrifice a revenue stream. And it’s not as if there’s
much room to move home plate back, as it’s already very close to the
wall as it is.

Eureka! Remove the seats behind home plate! It’s not as if anyone is sitting there anyway . . .

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.