Quote of the Day: 'Money, fame, girls looking at you'

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Julio Lugo, on Red Sox fans booing him for not making enough plays defensively:

If you try to make a play like that and you get destroyed by you
[media] guys the next day, it’s not fair. You guys can say whatever you
want. I can take it. I can [expletive] take it. I’m a human being, I’ve
got feelings, but I can take it. It’s tough. Nobody wants to be booed.
Not me, not anybody. At the same time, I’m not making excuses. I’ll
tell you the truth. I think the fans have been fair to me.

Sometimes you deserve the boos. Sometimes you don’t, but I love it
here. I work my ass off. I go to sleep feeling good every night that
I’m trying my best. I’ve got that best job in the world. I get paid a
lot of money. You’ve got everything you want–money, fame, a bunch of
girls looking at you. What more can you want? I love Boston, man.
There’s nowhere else you’d want to play. I love it.

Since signing a four-year, $36 million contract in the winter of 2006,
Lugo has hit .248/.316/.343 while sitting out one-third of the Red
Sox’s games. And his defense at shortstop, which is drawing most of the
fans’ ire of late, has rated 3.2 runs below average during that time
according to Ultimate Zone Rating.

Add it all up and Lugo has been about 13 runs better than a
replacement-level shortstop while being paid about $20 million (thus
far), so suffice it to say that his love affair with Boston isn’t
exactly mutual. On the other hand, he makes a pretty good point with
the whole “money, fame, and a bunch of girls looking at you” thing.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?