Steroids: why does the NFL get a free pass?

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Headline to a column written in the Philadelphia Daily News: “NFL seems to have better handle on steroid problem than MLB.”

The keyword is “seems.” According to the article, steroid use was de rigueur in the NFL back in the 80s in a way that it has never been alleged to be in baseball. Ex-lineman Brian Baldinger:

“I remember the first day of training camp, going into Player X’s
dorm room when the vets showed up,” says Baldinger, who played 11 NFL
seasons for the Cowboys, Eagles and Indianapolis Colts. “A brown bag
was dumped out on the bed full of syringes and you name it. And you
just kind of grabbed what you needed.

“It wasn’t like it is now, with baseball players saying, ‘Let’s get
the playing field even.’ Back then, it was understood that X-amount of
players, mostly linemen, that’s what they did [use steroids]. It wasn’t
looked at as a competitive advantage.”

In light of that culture the NFL, to its credit, instituted steroids
testing in the 1980s. And it has had some success. According to the
article, anonymous post-retirement surveys by a medical journal
indicated a 20.3% rate of steroid use among respondents in the 1980s
and a 12.7% rate currently. While it’s not unreasonable to assume that
the actual usage rate is higher simply because human nature does not
easily allow people to admit bad stuff, let’s just say that 12.7% is
accurate.

So rates are lower, but is that any basis to claim — as the people
quoted in this article claim — that the NFL’s testing regime
represents success? 12.7% of current NFL rosters equals roughly 215
players. In the past four years, however, a total of 43
players have been suspended for violating the NFL’s PED policy, or
about 10 a year. I’ll spare you the math, but trust me when I tell you
that 10 a year is somewhat less than 12.7%.

Yet despite this — and despite the fact that the no one has ever
provided any data suggesting that as many as 12.7% of baseball players
are using PEDs at any given time in the testing era — football is held
up as having its PED house in better order than baseball. And that’s
before you apply the same “look how big those dudes are” logic to
football that is so often applied to baseball.

I won’t claim that baseball’s testing regime is perfect — it’s
actually less comprehensive on paper than the NFL’s — but I find it
incredible that the NFL is given a virtual free pass when it comes to
steroids while baseball’s drug problems are continually dragged out for
public ridicule and abuse.

Something big could be brewing between the Yankees, Mets and Marlins

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Last night we heard the beginning of rumblings of a possible three-team trade involving the Yankees, Mets and Marlins that could involve J.T. Realmuto and Noah Syndergaard. Those rumblings — while still off in the distance — are getting a bit louder this morning, with reports floating that the Marlins are driving it and that it’s not just wishcasting from New York.

Into that mix comes something interesting: Ken Rosenthal reports that the Yankees are open to moving third baseman Miguel Andujar and that he’s “a name to watch.”

Coming as it does after that Yankees-Mets-Marlins chatter might mean that Andujar could be involved in all of that and, if he is, that could make for a monster deal.  Such a blockbuster would certainly be a good enough reason to part with Andujar despite a strong rookie season in which he hit.297/.328/.527 with 27 homers and 92 RBI. Worth noting that moving him could also open up third base for a big acquisition like Manny Machado, but that’s separate speculation, I suppose.

Not that any of this would be that easy, of course, especially if it involved the Mets. The Mets and Yankees rarely make trades with one another, and if they were to do one, it’d have to be something that the Mets could claim, convincingly, that they won lest they get raked over the tabloid coals. That being said, the Marlins reportedly want an established major leaguer in any deal for Realmuto and the Mets reportedly want more than just Realmuto if they were to give up Syndergaard. As such, Andujar could fit into that in any number of ways.

There’s obviously there’s a long way to go on this sort of thing, but the names floating around talks with the Yankees, Mets and Marlins are quite interesting and could suggest something big is brewing.