MILWAUKEE, WI - MAY 01: Jonathan Villar #5 of the Milwaukee Brewers hits a single in the third inning against the Miami Marlins during the first inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on May 01, 2016 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Mike McGinnis/Getty Images)
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Report: Jonathan Villar turned down a contract extension offer from the Brewers

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Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports that the Brewers “floated” an extension offer around $20 million to infielder Jonathan Villar, but the 25-year-old turned it down.

Villar broke out last season, batting .285/.369/.457 with 19 home runs, 63 RBI, 92 runs scored, and a major league best 62 stolen bases. He also spent some time at third base and second base in the second half after shortstop prospect Orlando Arcia was promoted to the big leagues.

Villar will become eligible for salary arbitration after the 2017 season and can become a free agent after the 2020 season.

Yankees first baseman Tyler Austin breaks his foot, out six weeks

NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 08:  Tyler Austin #26 of the New York Yankees connects on his ninth inning game winning home run against the Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on September 8, 2016 in the Bronx borough of New York City.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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When the Yankees signed Chris Carter it suggested that either first baseman Greg Bird or Tyler Austin would lose some playing time. It’s unclear what the plan might’ve been if all three of these guys were healthy, but now the Yankees needn’t worry themselves about it because Austin has gone and broke his foot.

He did it while taking batting practice, smacking a ball off of his foot. It’s a small break but will keep him in a boot for three weeks and away from baseball activities for six weeks. Which is basically all of spring training.

Austin, 25, got a cup of coffee with the Yankees last year, hitting .241/.300/.458 with five homers in 31 games.

McHugh, Odorizzi, Stroman win their arbitration cases

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 17:  Marcus Stroman #6 of the Toronto Blue Jays throws a pitch against the Cleveland Indians during game three of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Six arbitration decisions were announced on Tuesday. The results were being withheld until all cases were completed so that one case didn’t impact the other cases. Collin McHugh, Jake Odorizzi, and Marcus Stroman won their cases. Taijuan Walker, Chase Anderson, and Michael Wacha lost their cases. All six players were eligible for arbitration for the first time.

For those unfamiliar with the process, players eligible for arbitration file a salary figure they think they deserve and the team counters. If an agreement can’t be reached, they go to an arbitration hearing where an independent arbitrator will pick either the player’s submitted figure or the team’s figure. There is no in between in this instance.

Astros starter McHugh, 29, filed for $3.85 million and the team countered at $3.35 million. The right-hander made 33 starts for the Astros in 2016, putting up a 4.34 ERA and a 177/54 K/BB ratio over 184 2/3 innings. He was arguably the Astros’ most dependable starter.

Rays starter Odorizzi, 26, filed for $4.1 million and the Rays countered at $3.825 million. Over 33 starts, he posted a 3.69 ERA with a 166/54 K/BB ratio across 187 2/3 innings.

Blue Jays starter Stroman, 25, filed for $3.4 million and the Jays countered at $3.1 million. The right-hander crossed the 200-inning plateau, finishing with a 4.37 ERA and a 166/54 K/BB ratio in 32 starts.

Diamondbacks starter Walker, 24, filed for $2.6 million and the Diamondbacks countered at $2.25 million. In his second full season, the right-hander made 25 starts for the Mariners, authoring a 4.22 ERA and a 119/37 K/BB ratio over 134 1/3 innings.

Brewers starter Anderson, 29, filed for $2.85 million and the Brewers countered at $2.45 million. In 151 2/3 innings, the right-hander posted a 4.39 ERA and a 120/53 K/BB ratio.

Cardinals starter Wacha, 25, filed for $3.2 million and the Cardinals countered at $2.775 million. He finished with an ugly 5.09 ERA and a 114/45 K/BB ratio in 138 innings. Wacha battled a shoulder injury but is expected to be included in the club’s rotation “if he’s physically able,” according to GM John Mozeliak.