SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 21: Chris Iannetta #33 of the Seattle Mariners walks to the batter's box during a game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Safeco Field on August 21, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
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Diamondbacks sign Chris Iannetta to one-year deal

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Free agent catcher Chris Iannetta signed a one-year contract with the Diamondbacks, as confirmed by the team on Friday night. According to Nick Piecoro of AZCentral.com, the deal is set at $1.5 million.

The 33-year-old backstop batted .210/.303/.329 with seven home runs and 24 RBI for the Mariners in 2016. He was even shakier on defense, seeing a significant regression in his pitch framing skills that left him ranked among the worst defensive catchers in the league during the 2016 season (via StatCorner).

The Diamondbacks acquired another veteran backstop in Jeff Mathis last month, signing the 33-year-old free agent to a more sizable two-year contract. While Iannetta’s defense has yet to stabilize, Mathis’ skills behind the plate placed him among the top 20 performers in 2016. Piecoro reports that the Diamondbacks have high hopes for Iannetta’s on-base and power potential, neither of which appear to have surfaced in recent years. With Iannetta and Mathis hovering around the Mendoza line, both catchers are expected to partner with the more offensively-talented Chris Herrmann behind the plate in 2017.

 

Alexi Ogando signs with a Korean team

CHICAGO, IL - APRIL 29:  Alexi Ogando #40 of the Atlanta Braves pitches against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on April 29, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)
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Pitcher Alexi Ogando has signed with the Hanwha Eagles in the Korean Baseball Organization. Ogando, 33, posted a 3.94 ERA and 29/23 K/BB ratio over 32 innings for the Atlanta Braves last season.

Ogando began his career with a bang, posting a 139 ERA+ with the Rangers between 2010-13. But he suffered a sprained UCL in his right elbow in June of 2014, ending his season. He hasn’t been the same since, working in Boston and Atlanta quite unevenly.

Here’s hoping that Ogando can get his once promising career back on track in the KBO or, at the very least, make a little bank in the meantime.

Arizona Diamondbacks sue to get out of Chase Field

PHOENIX, AZ - JUNE 22:  General view of action as Ender Inciarte #5 of the Arizona Diamondbacks bats against the San Francisco Giants during the MLB game at Chase Field on June 22, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Giants defeated the Diamondbacks 4-1.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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The Arizona Diamondbacks have filed suit against the Maricopa County Stadium District to get out out — or to alter — the terms of their lease for Chase Field. Specifically, they have asked for the removal of a clause in their lease which prevents the team from talking to outside stadium groups until 2024 and prevents them from leaving the ballpark until 2028.

The lawsuit is the latest chapter in an increasingly acrimonious dispute between the team and the county stadium authority. At issue: the team has claimed that the county must make $135 million in necessary capital improvements to the ballpark. The county maintains that the Diamondbacks are asking for mere cosmetic improvements to the park. Others have claimed that the Dbacks simply want to reduce the number of seats in the 48,500-seat stadium in order to increase ticket prices and revenue.

The Diamondbacks had attempted to get an outside investment group to cover the costs in exchange for development concessions. They have also told the county that they would handle the improvements in exchange for allowing the team to essentially take over the ability to host non-baseball events in the park. The development deal has fallen through and their offer to the city rebuffed. Last spring the team asked the county to let them out of the lease. That was sharply and colorfully refused by the county. Now the club is suing to do it.

Chase Field opened for business in 1998. Despite the Diamondbacks’ claims in the suit that the renovations are needed to ensure the safety of the facility, it seems far fetched that the ballpark is on the verge of being structurally unsound after 19 seasons of use (the club says it’s OK for 2017). That matter, of course, would be at issue if the lawsuit progresses and each side would present expert testimony on the matter.

What does not seem far fetched, however, is a club looking for a lucrative new ballpark — or seeking lucrative renovations on someone else’s dime — despite playing in a relatively new one. The Braves are doing that this spring as they move into Sun Trust Park after playing in Turner Field between 1997 and 2016. The Rangers likewise are building a new ballpark despite Globe Life Field coming online in 1994. In both cases, the reason for the move was/is clearly financial.

Are the Dbacks doing the same thing? That would seem to be a matter for the courts now.