Tag: Toronto Blue Jays

ricky romero jays getty

Giants “making progress” on deal to sign Ricky Romero


Released by the Blue Jays two weeks ago, left-hander Ricky Romero is “making progress” on a deal to sign with the Giants according to Ben Nicholson-Smith of Toronto Sportsnet.

Romero was a 26-year-old All-Star in 2011 and the Blue Jays signed him to a $30 million long-term deal, but then he ceased being able to throw the ball over the plate. Since that All-Star season Romero has a 5.97 ERA with 113 walks in 188 innings, and his control got so bad that he spent most of 2013 and all of 2014 struggling in the minors.

Romero is still just 30 years old and the Blue Jays are on the hook for his entire contract, making it a no-risk flier for the Giants, but last season at Triple-A he had 42 walks in 38 innings. He serves as an example of how not every pre-arbitration contract extension for a young star player works out well for the team.

Michael Saunders put back on disabled list with discomfort in his surgically-repaired left knee

saunders getty

From the official Twitter account of the Toronto Blue Jays …

Saunders tore the meniscus in his left knee in late February when he stepped on a sprinkler head while shagging fly balls at the Blue Jays’ spring training complex in Dunedin, Florida. Initial reports suggested he would be out until the All-Star break, but the 28-year-old outfielder made it back before the end of April. And maybe that’s the problem — that he rushed his rehab. Saunders needed fluid drained from the surgically-repaired knee early last week and then got a cortisone injection a few days later. Now the Jays have decided that he’s better off getting some extended rest. It’s not clear when he might be ready to return.

Saunders looked like a sneaky-good acquisition for Toronto this offseason. He had a strong .791 OPS (128 OPS+) in 2014 for the Mariners and flirted with a 20-homer, 20-steal season with Seattle in 2012. Chris Colabello is starting in left field for the Blue Jays in Sunday afternoon’s series finale against the Red Sox.

Noah Syndergaard to make major league debut for Mets on Tuesday

Noah Syndergaard

Update (7:00 PM EST): Syndergaard will start Tuesday for the Mets, Mike Puma of the New York Post reports. Bartolo Colon will move up to pitch Sunday against the Phillies in place of Gee, who was placed on the 15-day disabled list.

Jared Diamond of The Wall Street Journal reports that Mets manager Terry Collins could use a spot starter at some point in the next 20 games. That very well could mean pitching prospect Noah Syndergaard would get the call from Triple-A Las Vegas to make his major league debut.

Syndergaard, 22, has been terrific in his first five starts of the season, posting a 1.82 ERA with a 34/8 K/BB ratio in 29 2/3 innings. The right-hander, acquired from the Blue Jays in the R.A. Dickey trade, entered the season rated as the ninth-best prospect in baseball according to Baseball Prospectus.

Oh, and Syndergaard can apparently rake, too.

Mets starter Dillon Gee is currently dealing with a groin issue, per ESPN’s Adam Rubin. As a result, he is unlikely to make his next start on Sunday against the Phillies. That’s one possible opening for Syndergaard.

Brook Jacoby and umpire Doug Eddings were in a “loud, obscenity-laced, nose-to-nose exchange”

Tampa Bay Rays v Toronto Blue Jays

The other day Major League Baseball suspended Blue Jays hitting coach Brook Jacoby for 14 games after he got into a confrontation with umpire Doug Eddings in the tunnel underneath Fenway Park. The details of the confrontation were vague, but there was an argument and the reports said that Jacoby “got physical” with Eddings.

Some more background came out on this last night, with Edwin Encarnacion filling in the media with what he saw. This from John Lott of the National Post:

Edwin Encarnacion says he was there in the Fenway Park tunnel when the fracas erupted, and saw everything: the loud, obscenity-laced, nose-to-nose exchange between hitting coach Brook Jacoby and umpire Doug Eddings.

Encarnacion says that it was heated but that, contrary to reports from the other night, Jacoby did not physically assault Eddings:

“I saw it, but I didn’t see anything that they say,” Encarnacion said in an interview. “They’re saying Brook got the umpire against the wall and put his hand on his neck. I didn’t see that.”

Rather, it seems that any contact between Jacoby and the umpire was “probably incidental,” not intentional as the umpire’s report would have it, and that “Eddings turned, came back aggressively and got in Jacoby’s face.”

It’s not cool to run down an umpire in the tunnel to argue balls and strikes after a game. But it’s also not cool for an umpire to respond to that sort of thing and, as appears to be the case here, amp up the tension in an already tense exchange in an enclosed space. There was no word of any discipline of the umpires in this matter.

Now that we’re hearing more, however, it’ll be interesting to see if, like so many other incidents and transgressions lately, Major League Baseball simply declines to pursue it because the target belongs to a group of folks it has historically been loathe to discipline.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

Jeff Francoeur

Phillies 5, Braves 2: Of course Jeff Francoeur comes back to Atlanta, riding an 0-for-19 streak, and knocks the cover off the ball. This is the place of his birth. Where he was forged like steel into a machine that destroys garbage pitching like that he faced last night. Frenchy was 4-for-5 with a double, a triple and a couple driven in. A big night all around for ex-Braves as Aaron Harang allowed one run over six. Hell, I half expected Kyle Davies to pitch a couple scoreless frames.

Rays 5, Red Sox 1: Jake Odorizzi tames the Sox’ lineup, scattering seven hits. A lineup without Hanley Ramirez, who left in the first inning with a shoulder injury. Clay Buchholz continued to struggle, giving up five runs in six and a third. After the game he said “You go out there and try to throw a lot of strikes, not walk guys.” If you read that with a lot of emphasis on the “you,” as if he’s contrasting all other pitchers with himself, it sounds like a fairly accurate description of much of his past couple of seasons.

Rangers 2, Astros 1: The winning streak is over. A Jake Smolinski RBI single in the eighth and then a Robinson Chirinos sac fly in the ninth was all the Rangers needed because a first inning Evan Gattis sac fly was all the Astros got. The streak stops at 10 despite a fine outing from April AL Pitcher of the Month Dallas Keuchel (8 IP, 5 H, 1 ER, 8K).

Mariners 3, Angels 2: The AL Player of the Month had a decent night too, with Nelson Cruz going yard to snap a scoreless tie in the seventh.That’s his 14th on the year, and Cruz is on an 87-homer pace. I am inclined to believe he won’t keep it up, but man, I don’t think most folks expected him to even keep up his 2014 pace this year.  Felix Hernandez, whose greatness is rarely confined to single month, was excellent (7 IP, 6 H, 1 ER, 8K).

Giants 2, Padres 0: Madison Bumgarner tossed no-hit ball into the seventh and shutout ball into the eighth and the pen locked it down. In his last two starts he has beaten Clayton Kershaw and Tyson Ross and shut down the Dodgers and Padres’ potent lineups. He’s pretty good when you think about it some.

Nationals 6, Marlins 4: A comeback thanks to four in the eighth. The offensive charge was led by Yunel Escobar who had a career-high five hits. Ian Desmond hit a homer during that eighth inning. Tanner Roark got his first career save.

Blue Jays 3, Yankees 1: Russell Martin knocked in a run with a pinch-hit single in the eighth inning. We usually say “against his old mates,” and then I usually say “well maybe they weren’t his old mates because teams turn their rosters over so much” but then I remembered it was the Yankees and, yeah, they are his old mates because it’s been mostly the same guys there forever.

Brewers 4, Dodgers 3: Craig Counsell is now the all-time leader in winning percentage among Milwaukee Brewers managers. His new club rallied for three runs in the eighth inning off of a tiring Clayton Kershaw and a less-than-jake Chris Hatcher. Gomezes Hector and Carlos helped key the rally, the latter with a homer the former with an RBI double.

Cardinals 10, Cubs 9: A five-run first inning for the Cubs was met with a four-run first inning for he Cards. Having lost a five-run lead early, the Cubs then went and lost a four-run lead later. when St. Louis rallied in the sixth and seventh. Mark Reynolds hit a grand slam in the first rally. The rally in the sixth and seventh was a little more sustained. The Cardinals’ 19-6 record is their best start since 1900. And it’s not like they haven’t had a couple other halfway decent squads in the past 115 years.

Twins 8, Athletics 7: Another 4-0 first inning lead blown, this one by Oakland. The big hit: a two-out, three-run homer by Torii Hunter in the sixth to break the 5-5 tie. After that the A’s tried to claw back but couldn’t quite get there. That’s five wins in a row for Minnesota.

Diamondbacks vs. Rockies: POSTPONED:All the rain

All the rain
Cover me now
All the rain
All the rain
Cover me now