Tag: Toronto Blue Jays

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And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Yankees 13, Red Sox 3: Boy, that escalated quickly. I mean, that really got out of hand fast. The Sox had a 2-1 in the sixth inning before the Yankees scored three times in the bottom of that inning and then nine times — nine times? NINE TIMES — in the seventh. Brian McCann drove in four. Chris Young knocked in three. A-Rod killed a guy with a trident.

Nationals 5, Diamondbacks 4: Wilson Ramos hit two-run single with one out in the bottom of the eighth to break a 3-3 tie and the Nats snapped their four-game skid. Didn’t matter in the standings though because . . .

Mets 5, Marlins 1: . . . The Mets won their fifth straight thanks to a four-run eighth inning. Juan Lagares had a two-run triple in that frame and Eric Campbell broke the tie with an RBI single. After the game Marlins manager Dan Jennings talked about how it’s hard to lose a game like this:

“They have a lot of momentum going their way. But when you stay right there cheek-to-cheek with them and let it get away it’s definitely frustrating.”

There’s your problem, Dan. You’re supposed to be playing baseball, not dancing.

Phillies 6, Dodgers 2: Here’s one you don’t see every day:

That was eventually ruled a balk and it put runners at second and third. A walk later loaded the bases for Makiel Franco who launched a grand slam. Not exactly the way Alex Wood wanted his Dodgers debut to go, I reckon. The Phillies, for their part, are 13-3 since the All-Star break. Which is the sort of thing, had someone given you odds on in Vegas a few weeks ago, no one woulda bet.

Cubs 5, Pirates 0: Anthony Rizzo had four hits, Jorge Soler and Starlin Castro each knocked in two and Jake Arrieta shut the Pirates out over seven innings. If the playoffs started today the Cubs would be in the wild card game. And we’d all be shocked because, wow, playoffs in August? How cool is that?!

Blue Jays 3, Twins 1: Josh Donaldson and Troy Tulowitzki hit homers that a combined distance of [bashes calculator keys while holding a pencil behind his ear] really dang far. The Jays have won six of seven and move past Minnesota into the second wild card spot.

Royals 5, Tigers 1: Sal Perez had three hits including a homer off Justin Verlander. Perez:

“I’m just up there trying to do my job and he’s trying to do his job. Today he left a couple fastballs up, and I was able to hit them.”

Story of Verlander’s season. The Tigers are now 1-8 in his nine starts.

Giants 8, Braves 3: Hunter Pence hit a tie-breaking three-run homer in the eighth and Jake Peavy was solid. It was a hot and humid night in Atlanta. The kind of heat that holds ya like a mama holds her son: tight when he tries to walk, even tighter when he runs. What did you think about the humidity Jake?

“I love the humidity,” said Peavy, who is from Mobile, Ala. “Certainly I’ve gotten away from it, but when I come home, I feel good. I’ve pitched in this weather all my life. I love it.”

In other words, Jake Peavy is a monster.

Reds 3, Cardinals 2: Anthony DeSclafani struck out nine Cardinals in six innings. Tidbit from the AP gamer said that DeSclafani is the most experienced starter in the Reds rotation right now. Which, holy crap, is true. He has 26 career starts.

Rangers 4, Astros 3: This is my eighth year doing these recaps, and over that time I’ve learned pretty quickly what the key takeaway of a game is based on either a quick glance at the box score or the lede graf of the game story. Most of the work is not figuring that out but, rather, trying to find something interesting to say about games that didn’t really have an obvious key takeaway. If you read these every day you know well that oftentimes I don’t think of anything interesting to say. There are a couple thousand baseball games a year. Not all of them are exciting.

This one, however, may be the single most difficult one I’ve ever encountered given the weird and narrow parameters of what I’m doing here with this feature. The Astros lost but so did the Angels so there was no playoff movement. Carlos Gomez had a couple of RBI and homered, but he was on the losing team, so that doesn’t lead. Prince Fielder homered but it was just a solo shot and no Ranger batter had a truly big night. Rangers starter Yovani Gallardo got a win but it was a fairly non-descript win. When I can’t find anything that jumps out in the box score I go to the gamer but here the gamer spends the first nine of its paragraphs on the closer who got the save.

Anyway: when the recap post goes up closer to 8AM than 7AM, a lot of time it has to do with me staring at a box score of a game like this wondering just what in the hell it means in the grand scheme of thing. Some of them don’t mean all that much I guess.

Rays 11, White Sox 3: Tampa Bay hit four homers, two of them off Chris Sale, who has given up seven runs in each of his last two starts and 20 runs in his last four. Which, um, kinda concerning?

Brewers 4, Padres 1: Jimmy Nelson allowed three hits and no earned runs in six and two-thirds. In a lost season, Nelson emerging as a solid starter is about as good a thing the Brewers have had all year.

Mariners 10, Rockies 4: Nelson Cruz homered in his fifth straight game. That’s the second time he’s had a streak of five this season. Jon Gray made his major league debut for Colorado. He had a 33-pitch first inning and allowed three runs on five hits, striking out four in four innings. He’ll see better days.

Indians 2, Angels 0: Exhibit A in the case against anyone who is still a big fan of pitcher win as Carlos Carrasco tossed a one-hitter over nine innings, striking out seven and needing only 100 pitches . . . yet got a no-decision because the Indians couldn’t score in regulation. Indians third baseman Giovanny Urshela saved the day for the team, however, by hitting a two-run homer in the 12th.

Athletics 5, Orioles 0: Chris Bassitt tossed seven shutout innings and Marcus Semien hit a three-run homer for some added insurance. Brett Lawrie had an RBI triple and Eric Sogard scored twice.

Blue Jays’ Aaron Sanchez, John Gibbons disciplined in the wake of Sunday’s plunkings

Aaron Sanchez

On Sunday Blue Jays pitcher Aaron Sanchez threw at Royals infielder Alcides Escobar. It was pretty clearly intentional. It came after Royals pitchers threw inside on Jays hitters multiple times, up in and in a couple of times, and hitting Josh Donaldson once. Which, at least to many, seemed intentional too.

But if there was equal intentional plunking going on, the league didn’t see it that way. It was just announced that Sanchez has received a three-game suspension and an undisclosed fine and manager John Gibbons has received a one-game suspension for coming back on to the field following his seventh inning ejection.

Sanchez could appeal. Gibbons will serve his suspension tonight.

Believe the hype: Carlos Correa is already a superstar


Carlos Correa is living up to the hype.

Called up on June 8–almost exactly three years after being drafted No. 1 overall by the Astros out of high school–the 20-year-old shortstop has played at an MVP level for two months despite being the youngest position player in the entire American League.

Correa homered Monday night for the fourth time in four games, giving him a total of 13 homers in 48 career games along with a .297 batting average, 14 doubles, 14 walks, five steals, and a .917 OPS. And he’s looked good defensively, too.

Here are the top OPS totals by shortstops this season:

CARLOS CORREA       .917
Troy Tulowitzki     .835
Brandon Crawford    .819
Jhonny Peralta      .804

And as impressive as it is to sit atop that list, it probably short-changes just how rare it is for a shortstop to be hitting this well while being this young. In the entire history of baseball here are the top OPS totals posted by 20-year-old shortstops with at least 150 plate appearances:

Alex Rodriguez     1.045     1996
CARLOS CORREA       .917     2015
Arky Vaughan        .787     1932
Jose Reyes          .769     2003
Jim Fregosi         .761     1962

I’m sure Correa will come back down to earth at some point or at least experience a slump, but for now he’s leading all MLB shortstops in OPS and the only 20-year-old shortstop in MLB history to out-hit him is Alex Rodriguez.

Everyone knew Correa was going to be good–he was a No. 1 pick and a consensus top-five prospect this season and last season–but for him to be this great this soon is a surprise. And really, that’s the story of the entire Astros team that sits atop the AL West at 60-47.

Gregg Zaun to Yordano Ventura: “stop writing checks with your mouth that your skinny ass can’t cash”

Gregg Zaun

source: Getty Images

In the wake of that Jose Bautista-Yordano Ventura Twitter beef, former catcher and Blue Jays analyst Gregg Zaun — who, last we heard from him was arguing in favor of hazing and abusing young players — delivered a verbal open letter to Yordano Ventura before yesterday’s Blue Jays-Twins game. The transcript:

“Dear Yordano Venutra. Are you seriously running your mouth? You don’t even have 3 years of uninterrupted service time. The only reason you’re even in the show right now is because Jason Vargas blew out.

“They sent you back to the semi-pros because you were stinking up the place. You weigh about a buck twenty five and should probably be watching your back.

“Jose Bautista is a 6 time all-star with 269 lifetime homers and 12 years of service time. Hardly a nobody. Show some respect and stop writing checks with your mouth that your skinny ass can’t cash. Especially from the safety of your team bus as you exit town with your tail between your legs? Don’t puff your chest out and challenge a grown man via Twitter, and then erase the tweets. Go knock on the Jays clubhouse door and do it like a man if you feel that strongly.

“Stop acting like Tommy-Tough Guy while hiding behind the internet and a dozen teammates. Stop running your mouth kid. We all know what you’re about, there’s no confusion there. You’re the guy who throws 100 mile an hour fastballs at guys when you know you don’t have to hit, or face the Jays again in the regular season. Grab a bat and man up. Otherwise shut up.

“Sincerley yours, The Manalyist. Section 134, at the Rogers Center in case you’re wondering where I’ll be.”

Apparently no one told Zaun that Ventura apologized. Otherwise, nice rant.

In other Zaun news, he was on “The Drive with Danny & CDot” on 610 AM in Kansas City today. Towards the end of the interview, the hosts asked him if the Blue Jays stole signs, which was the gist of Ventura’s complaints. His response: the Blue Jays stole signs when he played for them, that if you’re a pitcher and you’re  too dumb to not hide your signs you deserve to get them stolen, and that A-Rod was the best sign-stealer he’s ever seen.

So I guess he was more angry with Ventura over tone than content. Fun times.

Yordano Ventura apologizes to Jose Bautista

150803 yordano ventura

Last night Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura went off on Jose Bautista on Twitter, calling him a “nobody” and accusing him of stealing signs. All of this in response to the plunking war between the Blue Jays and Royals yesterday, after which Bautista had negative things to say about Ned Yost.

Ventura has now apologized. He did it to Bautista via Twitter. Or, at least, by screencapping a long apology and then tweeting it at him:

The translation:

Still wondering how things fly between these two teams should they meet in the playoffs. But for now, it appears, tempers are cooling. As tempers do.