Tag: Tim Hudson

Alex Rodriguez

And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights



Yankees 4, Orioles 3:

According to numerous baseball sources, the hip surgery Rodriguez is now recovering from will likely derail his playing career, leaving him in such a diminished role that he may consider a settlement or an outright retirement. He still has five years and $114 million left on his contract.

“I don’t know why he would want to go through the pain of rehabbing and trying to play up to the caliber of player he was, and come back to a game where nobody wants him,” said a baseball official.

“If he did that, he’d be a part-time player and presumably unable to achieve any of the incentive clauses in the contract or even the milestones.”

Twins 6, Athletics 5: The game story says “An impromptu dance party broke out in the Minnesota Twins clubhouse after their latest victory.” Given that this is the first time they’ve been three games over .500 in five years, I’m going to assume they were dancing to “California Gurls” or “Tik Tok” or something.

Rangers 5, Rays 4: Four in a row for Texas. The Rays could’ve been out of the second inning with the score tied at 0-0, but with two outs, Chris Archer struck out Rougned Odor, the pitch went wild and Odor made it to first base. Right after that Archer walked in two runs in a row and then gave up a two-run single. Great Moments in Keeping One’s Composure, I guess.

Diamondbacks 11, Padres 0: That there is a good, old-fashioned butt-kicking. Tuffy Gosewich hit three doubles and drove in four. It’s almost like his team signing a catcher earlier in the day lit a fire under him. By the way, between the composure thing with Chris Archer and the motivation thing with Gosewich, I’m deep in the narrative woods here. I realize that. But as the A-Rod excerpt from above has taught me, it’s way easier to just make up your own reality. Hell, you can win a Spink Award if you do it.

Dodgers 14, Brewers 4: The Joc Pederson unit must be malfunctioning: he didn’t hit any home runs and actually singled. The Yasmani Grandal unit is working just fine, though: 4-for-4, two homers and eight RBI. At the moment: Grandal: .301/.414/.534 with four homers; Matt Kemp: .292/.328/.417 with one homer. Give me a few minutes to come up with some story about why that is, too. I bet I can.

Cardinals 5, Cubs 1: John Lackey was dominant, striking out ten and allowing one run in seven and two-thirds. He also drove in a run [all together now] helping his own cause. The long start saving the bullpen some work was key here, as the Cards’ pen has been worked a lot lately. Which is the real issue with the Adam Wainwright injury. Attrition. One less starter who is likely to pitch deep into games, wearing down the staff over time. If Lackey can be the guy who pitches eight innings on the regs, it’ll go a long way toward making up for the loss of the team’s ace.

Tigers 4, White Sox 1: Kyle Lobstein scattered five hits, pitching seven and two-thirds himself. In Detroit it’s less about saving the bullpen and more about doing whatever is humanly possible to avoid having to use it. So, good show, Kyle.

Royals 7, Indians 4: Cory Kluber is 0-5 now. I know won-loss records of pitchers ain’t worth a diddly durn, but man. Eric Hosmer hit a homer drove in three. He’s hitting .324/.403/.565 on the year. It feels like he’s been around forever and that he’s never fulfilled all that potential he had back when he was a prospect. But he’s still just 25. If he’s breaking out now, it’s like the Royals added an All-Star bat or something.

Pirates 7, Reds 2: Seeing Andrew McCutchen go 3-for-4 after his slow start has to be encouraging. Seeing their five-game losing streak end has to be even more encouraging. Pittsburgh notched 11 hits and had 18 baserunners.

Astros 3, Angels 2: After two straight nights in which the Angels walked off the opposition, they were on the bad end of some ninth inning magic. Lost in the Wednesday night walkoff was the fact that Huston Street blew a lead. He did it again here.

Marlins 7, Giants 2:Dan Haren drove in two runs, scored two runs and pitched shutout ball into the seventh. Tim Hudson gave up six runs on 15 — 15! — hits in six and two-thirds. You don’t see starting pitchers stay in long enough to give up 15 hits very often.

Video: Giants win when batted ball hits Angels’ runner for the final out

Tim Hudson

Tim Hudson pitched eight effective innings for the Giants, but his bullpen was in the process of taking him out of the running for the win when Lady Luck helped out on defense.

Hudson started the ninth inning, but issued a lead-off walk to Collin Cowgill, so manager Bruce Bochy took him out and brought in Sergio Romo. Romo allowed a one-out single to Mike Trout to bring the tying run to the plate in the form of Albert Pujols, who had homered earlier in the game. Romo struck him out.

With the left-handed-hitting Kole Calhoun coming to the plate, Bochy brought in southpaw Jeremy Affeldt. Affeldt, however, gave up an RBI single to Calhoun, which brought the Angels closer at 5-3. Closer Santiago Casilla then came in to try to end the threat. David Freese singled to center to bring in another run, making it 5-4. Taylor Featherston came in as a pinch-runner for Freese at first base.

The Angels were, then, down by one run with runners on the corners and two outs in the top of the ninth. Matt Joyce swung at Casilla’s first offering, a 92 MPH fastball. The Giants were shifted to the right side, but none of their three infielders on that side had a chance to make a play on the ball as it hit Featherston. By rule, Featherston was out and the game ended. Second baseman Joe Panik, played in right field, probably could have made a play on it, but there was always the chance he misplayed it in some fashion. It’s certainly one of the more unconventional ways with which to win a ballgame.

Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez explains how he would pitch to Mike Trout

Pedro Martinez

Mike Trout hit another home run on Saturday afternoon, driving a Tim Hudson pitch out to left-center at AT&T Park with the bases empty. Trout now has six home runs on the season along with 15 RBI, six stolen base, and a .325/.436/.614 triple-slash line.

The 2012 AL Rookie of the Year and 2014 AL MVP is a nightmare for most pitchers in baseball. Of the 13 pitchers he’s faced 20 or more times, only Hisashi Iwakuma, Dallas Keuchel, and Sonny Gray have held him to an OPS below .800.

Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez was wrapping his final year in baseball, with the Phillies, at the time Trout was drafted in 2009 so the two never faced each other. Martinez explained on Twitter earlier how he’d approach Trout if was asked to:

The high fastball was famously identified as a problem for Trout last season, when he struck out at a career-high rate of 26 percent. Trout made adjustments, though, so it’s not surprising Martinez is thinking one step ahead.

Martinez vs. Trout would have been a terrific match-up to watch. Though Trout arguably deserves two more MVP awards, Martinez probably would have the edge considering what he did to a murder’s row of hitters in the 1999 All-Star Game at Fenway Park.

Tim Hudson “definitely leaning” toward retirement after the 2015 season

Tim Hudson

Giants starter Tim Hudson said in February that he was “definitely leaning” toward retiring at the end of the 2015 season. Hudson still has that same feeling three months later in this latest report from Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports.

Hudson, 40 in July, would like to spend more time with his family. But his wife Kim said she wouldn’t try to influence her husband’s decision, and Tim wouldn’t rule out pitching in 2016 if he’s still healthy and productive. He signed a two-year, $23 million contract with the Giants in November 2013 and it expires after the season, which would make him a free agent.

Hudson has posted a 3.91 ERA with a 1.34 WHIP and a 13/7 K/BB ratio in 25 1/3 innings to begin the season. He’s scheduled to start next at home against the Angels on Saturday.

Mark Buehrle earned his 200th career win

Mark Buehrle

Blue Jays starter Mark Buehrle earned the 200th win of his career on Friday afternoon in a 12-5 victory over the Orioles. He is one of 116 pitchers in baseball history to have won at least 200 games. The lefty allowed two runs on eight hits and a walk while striking out two in six innings. He left with an 11-2 lead.

Buehrle, 36, has aged rather well. Since his age-30 season in 2009, the veteran has a 3.83 ERA in 1,243 innings. He’s Jamie Moyer-esque as he averages around 84 MPH on his fastball. Only teammate R.A. Dickey averaged a lower velocity on his fastball last season (82 MPH). Buehrle has succeeded over the years by working quickly — he and Dickey were baseball’s two fastest-working pitchers last year — and limiting walks.

Buehrle has also been durable, pitching 200-plus innings in every season dating back to 2001. He can become a free agent after the season and though he’ll be heading into his age-37 season, he should draw a fair amount of interest given his track record. It wouldn’t be surprising to see him pitch into his 40’s like Moyer.

If Buehrle is able to win at least 13 games this year as he has in five out of the last six seasons, he could finish the season just behind or tied with John Smoltz for 89th all-time on the wins leaderboard with 213. Among active pitchers Tim Hudson currently has the most career wins at 214. CC Sabathia has 208 and Bartolo Colon has 205.