Tag: Sonny Gray


And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Yankees 21, Rangers 5: Well this was a ridiculous game. Down 5-0 after one inning, every Yankees fan I know on Twitter was giving up, changing the channel and/or cursing Chris Capuano, who didn’t even make it through that first inning. Then the Yankees put up an 11-spot in the second, capped by a Chris Young grand slam, and never looked back. It was 98 degrees at game time and this one lasted three hours, thirty-eight minutes. Rangers pitchers needed 97 more pitches to get through nine innings than the Yankees pitchers did. The box score looks like a crime scene. I’m gonna nominate this one for the least-fun game of the year in Major League Baseball.

Athletics 2, Dodgers 0: Sonny Gray tossed a three-hit, complete game shutout, striking out nine and lowering his ERA to 2.16. I watched this one. Because of the pace it was the rare west coast start I could see (almost) all of before falling asleep. That’s quite a brag for a 42-year-old guy who wakes up at 5:30 every day.

Orioles 7, Braves 3: Two homers and five driven in for Chris Davis and another crap road performance for Julio Teheran. Dude has a 2.37 ERA at Turner Field and a 7.24 ERA on the road. He must REALLY not like hotels.

Phillies 3, Blue Jays 2: Adam Morgan gave up a leadoff homer and found himself down 2-0 after two, but Philly came back with three in the fifth inning and then Ken Giles closed it out for his first save in the post-Papelbon era. The Phillies are on fire, having won 9 of 10 since the break. If they win out that’s 99 wins and I bet that would take the NL East this year. Just sayin’.

Royals 2, Indians 1: Not gonna say things are going great for the Royals right now, but things are going great for the Royals right now:


White Sox 9, Red Sox 4: Jose Abreu and Geovany Soto homered for Chicago. Soto’s broke the windshield of a car parked in a lot behind the Green Monster. Abreu’s caused this:


If you catch a ball going over the fence, you automatically become a wide receiver and have to maintain possession. Sorry, Mookie, them’s the breaks. In other news, Jeff Samardzija was solid until he ran out of gas in the ninth. Not that it matters much, but Chicago moved into sole possession of third place, a game ahead of the skidding Tigers.

Rays 10, Tigers 2: Did you hear the Tigers are skidding? Because they are. This time even their ace David Price couldn’t help them, with the Rays touching him for five runs in six innings. They touched the pen pretty good too, for five more runs in three, with Neftali Feliz doing most of the kerosene-spreading. He’s the Tigers’ big trade deadline pickup so far, you guys.


Mets 4, Padres 0: Noah Syndergaard was fantastic, retiring the first 18 Padres to start the game. He finished the game having only allowed three hits and no walks while striking out nine over eight innings. The Mets are only one back of Washington, who . . .

Marlins 4, Nationals 1: . . . lost to the Fish. Jose Fernandez worked around four walks in six innings, ending up allowing only one run. He’s now 15-0 for his career in Miami.

Rockies 7, Cubs 2: All-Star D.J. LeMahieu had three hits, extending his hitting streak to 18 games, and scored twice as the Rockies move to 1-0 in the Post-Tulowitzki era. The starting pitchers in this one were named Dallas Beeler and Yohan Flande. Those sound like hockey players, right? I’m pretty sure they’re hockey players.

Pirates 8, Twins 7: Jung Ho-Kang hit a tie-breaking homer in the ninth to give the Pirates their fourth win in five games. He had two hits, scored two runs and was hit by a pitch. His pickup is looking like one of the better ones of last offseason, especially given the Pirates infield injuries. Mark Melancon got the five-out win. Not a lot of closers, save situation or otherwise, are allowed to get five outs these days.

Astros 10, Angels 5: The AP gamer leads with “Jose Altuve is the spark plug that powers the Houston Astros.” Sadly, nfor now anyway, he is only the second-best spark plug in Astros history. No word on whether he’s “gritty.” He’s good, though, and here he drove in five runs as Houston takes the first in a key three-game series against the Angels, putting them in a virtual tie for first place. Houston overcame an early 4-1 deficit in this one. Mike Trout sat this one out with a bum wrist. Bad time for the best player in baseball to be on the shelf. He’s day to day.

Reds 4, Cardinals 0: Mike Leake’s final audition for other teams went well, as he tossed eight shutout innings. Joey Votto was the primary supporting player here, hitting a three-run homer on this 3-for-3 night. He walked too.

Diamondbacks 8, Mariners 4: David Peralta had three hits and drove in two in support of Zack Godley. There are an awful lot of Zacks/Zachs in Major League Baseball today. Really, I think we’ve reached Peak Zack.

Brewers 5, Giants 2: Wily Peralta pitched in a big league game for the first time in two months and he pitched well, allowing two runs over six innings and cooling off the hot Giants. Gerardo Parra tripled, doubled, singled and scored three runs.

HBT First-Half Awards: American League Cy Young

Chris Sale

With no baseball on Wednesday or Thursday, we’re taking stock of the best performances of the first half of the season by handing out midseason awards. Maybe someday we’ll have the budget for an actual Midseason Award Trophy, but for now they merely get our kind and admiring words. Next up: American League Cy Young Award.

Craig Calcaterra‘s ballot:

1. Chris Sale, Chicago White Sox
2. Sonny Gray, Oakland A’s
3. Dallas Keuchel, Houston Astros

This is a dang close race, folks, with arguments for all three of these guys, in terms of stats, in terms of narratives or in terms of whatever combination of those two things you prefer to let lead you in your analysis of such things.

Chris Sale, of course, has been striking out the world, leading the league in strikeouts, strikeouts per nine innings and leading the AL in WHIP and in Fielding Independent Pitching. Sonny Gray leads the American League in adjusted ERA+, ERA, and has given up fewer hits and fewer home runs per nine innings than any starter. Dallas Keuchel, for his part, is tied for the lead league in wins and WAR among pitchers. As far as narrative stuff goes, Keuchel is leading a surprisingly good Astros team, Sale tied the record for most consecutive games with ten strikeouts or more and Gray, well, he’s at least a reason to watch the A’s every fifth day.

If you ask me who should win this award ten times in the next few days I’d probably go back and forth between Sale and Gray a handful of times and may, when I’m feeling narrative-y, throw it Keuchel’s way on occasion. And I’d probably clear my throat and mention Felix Hernandez and Chris Archer a couple of times too because they’re having fantastic seasons. But if you put a gun to my head and make me choose one, I’ll choose Sale, because strikeouts are fun, even if they’re somewhat fascist.

Aaron Gleeman‘s ballot:

1. Dallas Keuchel, Houston Astros
2. Chris Sale, Chicago White Sox
3. Sonny Gray, Oakland A’s

I agree with basically everything Calcaterra said above, especially the stuff about this being an extremely close race so far. Chris Sale has been the most dominant starter, but in looking over all the relevant numbers I kept coming back to Dallas Keuchel as being every bit as deserving. He leads the league in innings pitched and batters faced–which is huge for an Astros rotation that otherwise hasn’t been particularly good–and Keuchel ranks second in ERA at 2.23, just 0.18 behind Sonny Gray and 0.49 better than Sale.

I give Keuchel the slight edge based mostly on a higher workload–he’s thrown 14 more innings than Gray and 18 more innings than Sale–while also having zero problem with anyone thinking Sale or Gray should be in the top spot. It’s also worth giving a little nod to reigning Cy Young winner Corey Kluber, whose secondary numbers remain Cy Young-caliber even if poor lineup, bullpen, and defensive support from the Indians have burdened him with an ugly win-loss record and too many runs allowed.

2015 All-Star Game Preview



CINCINNATI — All of the parties, the Derbys the parades and the baloney is out of the way. Now it’s time for the actual All-Star Game.

Well, not quite yet. This evening there will still be a lot of . . . stuff. Pete Rose will make an appearance on the field here at Great American Ballpark, and I predict his ovation will be louder than even that given to Todd Frazier last night.

Also, the four “Greatest Living Ballplayers” and the “Franchise Four” of each team — all of which were voted on by fans — will be announced prior to the game. One of those Greatest Living Ballplayers is set to throw out the first pitch. That should create some controversy and argument fodder over the next couple of baseball-free days.

The U.S. Navy will conduct a flyover featuring four FA-18 Super Hornets. They practiced here yesterday. They’re loud. Not quite as loud, but definitely amplified will be Ciara, who will sing the U.S. National Anthem and Leo Welsh who will perform the Canadian Anthem. Country singer Josh Turner will sing “God Bless America.”

But then there is a game. Here’s what you need to know:

First Pitch: 8:15PM
Channel: FOX

American League Lineup

1. Mike Trout, CF, Angels
2. Josh Donaldson, 3B, Blue Jays
3. Albert Pujols, 1B, Angels
4. Nelson Cruz, DH, Mariners
5. Lorenzo Cain, RF, Royals
6. Adam Jones, LF, Orioles
7. Salvador Perez, C, Royals
8. Jose Altuve, 2B, Astros
9. Alcides Escobar, SS, Royals
Dallas Keuchel, SP, Astros

Notes: Quite a familiar AL group. Nelson Cruz, Josh Donaldson, Sal Perez, Mike Trout and Adam Jones all started last year, and many of them are on their third or fourth go-around. Missing is Alex Gordon and there is also no Miguel Cabrera due to injuries. Chris Sale may only be available in an emergency. Sonny Gray is unavailable due to pitching on Sunday.

National League Lineup

1. Andrew McCutchen, CF, Pirates
2. Todd Frazier, 3B, Reds
3. Bryce Harper, RF, Nationals
4. Paul Goldschmidt, 1B, Diamondbacks
5. Buster Posey, C, Giants
6. Anthony Rizzo, DH, Cubs
7. Jhonny Peralta, SS, Cardinals
8. Joc Pederson, LF, Dodgers
9. DJ LeMahieu, 2B, Rockies
Zack Greinke, SP, Dodgers

Notes: Joc Pederson is filling in for the injured Matt Holliday. No Giancarlo Stanton or Dee Gordon for the same reasons. Max Scherzer pitched on Sunday or else you figure he’d get the start. Otherwise it’s McCutchen and Goldschmidt and a lot of guys who haven’t been here much. At least as starters. There’s a lot of experience here from guys who were reserves in the past.

  • All of the reserves and pitchers — plus and minus a few substitutions — can be seen here.

As for a prediction? Well, these things are total crapshoots. I think Ned Yost constructed a more real life roster with middle relievers and utility guys in places, whereas Bruce Bochy has more starters and veterans. But if that is an advantage to Yost, it’s probably made up for by the fact that Bochy is the better manager.

Ultimately, however, this is the most unpredictable game played all year because it’s almost entirely not a game as we tend to understand baseball. But hey, at least it doesn’t count for anything important, right?

Oh, wait. It does. Something that has, historically, mattered a whole lot. As in,since 1985, the team with home-field advantage has won 23 of 29 World Series. And until the Giants beat the Royals on the road in Game Seven last year, the home team had won nine straight World Series Game Sevens.

Play ball?

Zack Greinke and Dallas Keuchel named All-Star starters

Zack Greinke AP

All-Star managers Bruce Bochy and Ned Yost have chosen their starting pitchers, with right-hander Zack Greinke of the Dodgers getting the assignment for the National League and left-hander Dallas Keuchel of the Astros being the pick for the American League.

Greinke’s excellence is well known. He’s a three-time All-Star and former Cy Young winner who currently has a 35.2-inning scoreless streak and an MLB-best 1.39 ERA that’s the lowest by any starting pitcher at the All-Star break since 1968.

The other starting pitchers on the NL roster are Madison Bumgarner, A.J. Burnett, Gerrit Cole, Jacob deGrom, Carlos Martinez, Clayton Kershaw, Shelby Miller, Max Scherzer, and Michael Wacha.

Keuchel is a great story. He was never considered a top prospect, had a losing record with a 3.74 ERA in the minors, and went 9-18 with a 5.20 ERA for the Astros in 2012 and 2013. Then last season he took a huge step forward, throwing 200 innings with a 2.93 ERA, and Keuchel has been even better this season with an 11-4 record and 2.23 ERA in a league-high 137 innings.

The other starting pitchers on the AL roster are Chris Archer, Sonny Gray, Felix Hernandez, David Price, Chris Sale, and Hector Santiago.

Last year’s All-Star starters were Adam Wainwright of the Cardinals for the National League and Felix Hernandez of the Mariners for the American League.