Shane Robinson

Oswaldo Arcia

The marginalization of Oswaldo Arcia

19 Comments

There are currently seven major leaguers 24 and under with a career OPS+ over 100 in at least 500 at-bats.

167 – Mike Trout
135 – Bryce Harper
108 – Manny Machado
105 – Christian Yelich
104 – Oswaldo Arcia
103 – Avisail Garcia
101 – Nolan Arenado

Six of those guys are considered building blocks by their teams. The other, Arcia, seems to be at a career crossroads already, even though he’s hardly tasted failure at any point in his career.

Arcia arrived in the majors before his 22nd birthday, debuting in April 2013. He was demoted a few times that season, even though his numbers were decent, if unspectacular, throughout. He finished up at .251/.304/.430 with 14 homers in 351 at-bats.

The next spring, Arcia was penciled right in as the Twins’ right fielder, only to develop wrist troubles very early on. He was placed on the DL on April 9. He went on to excel in his rehab assignment, hitting .308/.349/.487 in 12 games, yet the Twins optioned him to Triple-A for a spell anyway. He came back in late May and played regularly the rest of the way, finishing up at .231/.300/.452. Despite the low average, he had a 108 OPS+, largely because of his 20 homers (second on the Twins).

After last season, the Twins took away Arcia’s position by signing Torii Hunter, but he was still seemingly assured the left field job. However, weird things happened right off the bat. The left-handed-hitting Arcia started Opening Day against lefty David Price, only to find himself on the bench against a righty three days later. Arcia went on to sit three times in the first nine games. He slumped. He only started to pull out of it at the end of April, going 7-for-13 with a homer in four starts. That’s what a hip injury put him on the disabled list.

Despite that promising surge, it was apparent right away that Arcia might not immediately reemerge in Minnesota’s plans following his return. For one thing, the team needed a break from playing three liabilities in the outfield, as it often was with Arcia in left, Jordan Schafer in center and Hunter in right. Arcia’s struggles against lefties and his strikeout rate were also problems, even though he didn’t fan overly much during April (15 K’s in 65 PA).

Sure enough, Arcia was sent down after going hitless in the first four games of his rehab assignment. It’s the third time in three years he’s been optioned out. Whether it’s the hip, his frustrations over being buried or something else, he’s continued to slump since the demotion, hitting .214/.227/.310 in 12 games.

Arcia is a flawed player. The troubles against lefties aren’t going away, and he’s a poor outfielder perhaps best suited to DH duties. That seemed like a big problem at the start of the year, following Kennys Vargas’s emergence. But with Vargas also struggling to find his way with these 2015 Twins, there’s plenty of room for Arcia at DH should the team decide to go that route. Obviously, it hasn’t happened yet.

Still, it’s not at all reasonable that the Twins are so down on him. Beat writers have speculated that he’ll be traded. One writers suggested this spring that he should begin the season in the minors. Of late, there’s been more talk about prospect Miguel Sano becoming the Twins’ DH than Arcia. Oddly enough, Arcia is playing regularly in right field in Triple-A, even though the team surely won’t ask Hunter to change positions this year. It makes little sense. Right-handed power is difficult to come by these days, and young hitters as productive as Arcia rarely prove to be flops.

Maybe all of this turns around if Arcia turns it on in Triple-A over these next few weeks. After all, the Twins have given Shane Robinson two starts and Eduardo Escobar one start in left field over these last five games. Vargas has slumped since his return from Triple-A and has no sort of handle on the DH job. It’s not hard to imagine Arcia spending the final three months of the season as one of the Twins’ best hitters. Unfortunately, it’s also not hard to imagine him getting traded for a veteran security blanket as the Twins try to gear up for a playoff run.

Rangers place Delino DeShields Jr. on disabled list with hamstring strain

The Texas Rangers' Delino DeShields is called out on strikes in the first inning against the Minnesota Twins at Globe Life Park in Arlington, Texas, on Friday, June 12, 2015. (Rodger Mallison/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS via Getty Images)
2 Comments

After losing Josh Hamilton to a hamstring injury earlier this month, the Rangers had to place outfielder Delino DeShields Jr. on the 15-day disabled list today with a left hamstring strain.

DeShields, who is batting .269/.358/.386 with 12 RBI and 13 steals in 48 games this season, suffered the injury yesterday while trying to track down a fly ball off the bat of Twins outfielder Shane Robinson in the sixth inning. According to Anthony Andro of FOX Sports Southwest, he’s expected to miss around three weeks.

The Rangers have called up second baseman Rougned Odor to replace DeShields on the active roster. The 21-year-old was demoted last month after batting just .144 with one home run and a .486 OPS over his first 29 games this season, but he put up a monster .352/.426/.639 batting line with five home runs and 19 RBI in 30 games with Triple-A Round Rock.

With DeShields out, Joey Gallo is making his first major league start in left field tonight against the Dodgers. He made six starts in left field during his time with Double-A Frisco this season and it’s possible he could stick there when Adrian Beltre returns from his thumb injury.

Cardinals release outfielder Shane Robinson

shane robinson getty
28 Comments

From Chris Cotillo of MLB Daily Dish comes word that the Cardinals have cut ties with outfielder Shane Robinson, a fifth-round pick from the 2006 draft who has appeared in a total of 268 major league games.

Robinson set records at Florida State University and has produced promising numbers at the upper levels of the minor leagues, but the 30-year-old batted just .150/.227/.200 across 66 plate appearances this past season for St. Louis and he is a weak .231/.303/.308 career hitter in parts of five big league campaigns.

Monday’s acquisition of Jason Heyward made Robinson all the more expendable.

He’s a pretty good defender and should be able to find a new organization quickly.