Tag: Salvador Perez

Yordano Ventura

Yordano Ventura ejected for hitting Brett Lawrie with a pitch


On Friday night, Athletics third baseman Brett Lawrie slid hard into second base in an attempt to break up a double play. In doing so, he injured Royals shortstop Alcides Escobar’s knee. It was, it appears, a dirty slide even if Lawrie didn’t intend to cause an injury.

Lawrie attempted to apologize to Escobar after the game, but there were some crossed wires there.

Lawrie received a lusty booing from the home crowd in Kansas City prior to his first at-bat in the top of the third inning in Saturday night’s game. He and catcher Salvador Perez had a brief chat at home plate before the at-bat began. Lawrie grounded out to third base for the first out.

In the fourth, the Athletics broke out for five runs, capped by a Josh Reddick three-run home run off of Ventura. Reddick bats directly in front of Lawrie. Ventura started off with an 85 MPH curve out of the zone, then hit Lawrie with a 99 MPH fastball. Ventura was immediately ejected by home plate umpire Jim Joyce. Lawrie walked directly to first base.

Yohan Pino came in to relieve Ventura.

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

Miguel Cabrera

Tigers 8, Indians 5: Two homers for Miguel Cabrera and yet another sweep for the Tigers. When they go 162, fine, I’ll support him for the MVP.

Cardinals 7, Reds 5: Jhonny Peralta tied it with a two-run homer in the eighth and Matt Carpenter put St. Louis up by two with a homer of his own in the 11th. This game note is really darn interesting: “Reds catcher Brayan Pena left the game in the seventh after injuring his left shoulder in a fall at first base while beating out a leadoff bunt.” Just a LOT to unpack there.

Rays 8, Marlins 5: Miami’s season sure ain’t starting well, what with them being 1-5. Actual postgame quote from Jarrod Saltalamacchia: “It could have been worse. We could have been 0-6.” He must of said that before he realized two Marlins players — Don Kelly and Jeff Mathis — each broke a finger during the game. For real.

Blue Jays 10, Orioles 7: UPDATE: Though I probably get more “you don’t respect us!” rebop from O’s and Jays fans than any other two fan bases, please trust me when I tell you that I didn’t mean to leave this one blank earlier as some sort of passive-aggressive “this game was boring comment.” I just write these hella early and sometimes the brain hasn’t kicked in yet. Anyway: the Jays hit three homers because homers are their thing. The last one — from Jose Bautista — came after Darren O’Day threw one behind him. Those two have a history, of course. And Bautista is way better than O’Day, of course, so he’s gonna get the better of them over time. Maybe O’Day should cut it out?

Mets 4, Braves 3: I suppose it was folly to think Atlanta would go undefeated this year. And, if you have to lose a game, better to lose it in one which contained some outrageously awesome performances from athletes of bleeding-edge skill.

That was Colon’s first RBI in a decade. Colon started play yesterday as a .075/.080/.081 career hitter.

Nationals 4, Phillies 3: Bryce Harper homered and Wilson Ramos drove in two, including the go-ahead run in the 10th. Max Scherzer: one run, eight strikeouts in six innings. Yet, once again, does not pitch well enough to win. I am afraid of what the intimidating, influential and wise columnists of Washington will say today.

White Sox 6, Twins 2: I guess this means that Chris Sale’s foot feels OK (6 IP, 5 H, 1 ER, 8K). Adam LaRoche hit a homer and had an RBI single.

Pirates 10, Brewers 2: And I guess this means Andrew McCutchen’s knee feels OK (2-for-4, HR, 4 RBI). Chris Sadler got his first MLB win after allowing two runs in five innings.

Astros 6, Rangers 4: Hank Conger had a two-run homer in the 14th to win it. But he wouldn’t have had the chance to it if wasn’t for George Springer’s amazing, grand-slam-saving catch in the 10th. That gave the Rangers three of their 15 stranded runners in the game. They drew seven walks and four Rangers batters were hit by pitches on top of that. If you can’t win a game when the other team just gifts you 11 base runners like that, fate ain’t letting you win that game.

Royals 9, Angels 2: Put the Royals in the 162-0 camp with the Tigers. Alcides Escobar and Alex Rios hit two-run doubles  and Salvador Perez homered There was some chippiness here because, apparently, Yordano Ventura doesn’t like athletes on the other team to say incendiary things like “let’s go, you guys!” Um, OK.

Mariners 8, Athletics 7: A 10th inning Nelson Cruz homer put the M’s ahead for good. Earlier in the game Rickie Weeks hit a pinch-hit three-run job. This day was not perfect for Seattle, but a couple of offseason additions designed to help fix the M’s biggest problem — offense — paid off well.

Padres 6, Giants 4: Wil Nieves hit a grand slam off of Jake Peavy as the Padres take three of four from the defending champs. Nieves’ Made his big league debut in 2002 for the Padres, catching Jake Peavy. A few things have happened since then, I suppose.

Cubs 6, Rockies 5: La Troy Hawkins came in to save the game with a comfy lead in the ninth — And he needed to only get two of the three outs with a two-run lead. But then a walk-wild pitch-single combo brought Chicago to within one and a subsequent two-run homer by Dexter Fowler put the Cubs ahead. That’s three appearances for Hawkins this year, the last two of which were blown saves. He’s allowed five runs on seven hits in two and two-thirds innings. Ick.

Dodgers 7, Diamondbacks 4: Alex Guerrero made some waves in spring training when he said that he deserved to be in the big leagues and wouldn’t allow the Dodgers to send him down. They’re happy they have him on the big club now, I reckon. He went 3-for-5, homered and had four RBI after being pressed into service due to injuries to Justin Turner and Juan Uribe. Yasiel Puig and Joc Pederson homered too, so viva youth in Los Angeles.

Yankees 14, Red Sox 4: All Yankees started got a hit and all Yankees starters scored a run in this romp. A-Rod hit a three-run double and Chase Headley and Stephen Drew hit back-to-back bombs. Masahiro Tanaka wasn’t fantastic, but he pitched five generally competent innings to get the win, so maybe the columnists will wring their hands over something else this week.

The benches cleared in Sunday’s Angels-Royals game

Mike Trout

Royals starter Yordano Ventura and Angels outfielder Mike Trout jawed at each other in the top of the sixth inning of Sunday afternoon’s game. The Royals entered the inning leading 7-1, but Trout reached on a one-out single and came around to score on an Albert Pujols double.

Trout, according to Andy McCullough of the Kansas City Star, yelled “Let’s go!”, ostensibly an effort to motivate his team in a still-winnable game. This rankled Ventura, who shouted something in Spanish that Trout didn’t understand. Catcher Salvador Perez immediately jumped in and escorted Ventura away from Trout. Pujols ran in from second base and the benches and bullpens cleared. No punches were thrown.

You can watch the confrontation at MLB.com with this link. Ventura eventually exited the game with a cramp in his right calf. In his start, he yielded two runs on four hits and two walks while striking out seven. The Royals went on to win 9-2.

Reds are planning to run Devin Mesoraco into the ground

Devin Mesoraco, Marlon Byrd

Cincinnati just signed catcher Devin Mesoraco to a four-year, $28 million contract and now apparently the Reds are going to run him into the ground.

Reds manager Bryan Price told Hal McCoy of the Dayton Daily News that he wants Mesoraco behind the plate for nearly every game:

I see him as a Yadier Moilina-type guy who is going to catch 145 games a year, more so than I see him catching 110 a year and playing 20 or 30 at first base. … I anticipate Mesoraco catching a lot more games this year, especially if he stays healthy.

Mesoraco started a career-high 104 games at catcher last season.

In terms of Price’s quote/plan, it should be noted that Yadier Molina has never actually started 145 games at catcher in a season. Or even 140. He’s only started more than 135 games once, in 2009. It should also be noted that Salvador Perez, Jason Kendall, and Russell Martin are the only catchers in the past decade to start 145 or more games in a season.

And there’s a reason why so few catchers do so: They either can’t handle that big of a workload physically, breaking down before they can start that many games. Or their teams recognize what would probably happen if they asked them to start 145 games and decide against it.

Good luck, Devin.

Remember this when Salvador Perez is worn down next year

salvador perez light blue getty

Salvador Perez caught an MLB-high 143 games during the regular season and was behind the plate for all 15 of the Royals’ postseason games, finishing the year with the most starts by a catcher in the history of baseball.

Not surprisingly he struggled down the stretch and into the playoffs, hitting just .190 in his final 22 regular season games and .207 in the postseason.

And now Perez is starting even more games at catcher for the MLB team in the All-Star Series in Japan.

Jon Morosi of FOXSports.com is treating this as a good thing, writing stuff like “Perez earned his paycheck” and “loves the game.” And that’s all true, but he’s also a 24-year-old catcher who has now caught more than 160 games and spent more than 1,400 innings behind the plate in one year. Catchers tend not to age particularly well anyway, but if Perez looks worn down in 2015 (and perhaps beyond) it won’t exactly be a mystery why.