Tag: Ron Gardenhire


In first start since no-hitting Twins, Jered Weaver to face … the Twins

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Minnesota manager Ron Gardenhire didn’t enjoy Jered Weaver’s no-hitter against his Twins last Wednesday.

Gardenhire paced behind his desk while addressing reporters after the game, the picture painted by Joe Christensen of the Star Tribune showing the manager in a slow burn, using great effort to avoid blowing up. I’m guessing he looked something like this.

That’s understandable. It’s been a long season already for the Twins (and it’s only May 7), who enter the week with the worst record in baseball (7-20). Being no-hit by a great pitcher is one thing, but Gardenhire was unhappy with his team’s pitching, lack of aggression and lack of attention to detail.

He said the Twins’ performance was “not acceptable,” and that his team looked “like Little Leaguers out there, and that’s a bunch of bull.”

Gardenhire missed the Twins’ series in Seattle over the weekend. Not because he needed a break – though that’s entirely possible – but because he returned to Minneapolis for his daughter’s graduation from Southwest Minnesota State.

He returns to manage his club on Monday night, and hopefully his weekend was relaxing because waiting for the Twins will be the Los Angeles Angels with – you guessed it – Jered Weaver on the mound.

Monday night will be Weaver’s first start since his no-hitter, and if you don’t know anything about Johnny Vander Meer, you might want to click here and study up.

The odds of Weaver tossing consecutive no-hitters are essentially zero. There’s no way he’ll be as focused, as sharp and as lucky as he was last week. And as bad as the Twins offense is – they managed just one hit on Saturday against Felix Hernandez and a lone Mariners reliever —  they’re still a bunch of big leaguers like Joe Mauer and Denard Span and Josh Willingham.

Still, as favorable a scheduling occurrence this is for Weaver, it is equally unlucky for Ron Gardenhire’s Twins.

Serenity now, Skip. Serenity now.

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Ron Gardenhire follows Manager of the Year award with contract extension

Ron Gardenhire

Ron Gardenhire is having a pretty good week.

Yesterday he was named American League Manager of the Year after finishing runner-up for the award five times in the previous eight seasons and Joe Christensen of the Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that the Twins will soon announce a two-year contract extension for Gardenhire.

According to Christensen the Twins’ entire coaching staff has agreed to two-year contracts, while Gardenhire’s new deal will keep him in Minnesota through 2013.

Gardenhire has had little success in the playoffs, going 6-21 with 12 consecutive losses that includes three straight first-round sweeps at the Yankees’ hands, but he’s won six division titles in nine years after the Twins had just one winning season in the nine years before he took the job.

Overall he’s 803-656, which is good for a .550 winning percentage that ranks 23rd all time among managers with at least 1,000 games.

Gardenhire tops Washington for AL Manager of the Year

Image (1) gardenhire.jpg for post 6304

Ron Gardenhire finished runner-up for Manager of the Year in five of his first eight seasons as the Twins’ skipper, including each of the past two seasons. Today he finally claimed the award for the first time, receiving 16 of 28 first-place votes to top Ron Washington of the Rangers and Joe Maddon of the Rays.

Gardenhire led the Twins to their sixth AL Central title in nine seasons, winning 94 games despite losing closer Joe Nathan to Tommy John surgery in spring training and cleanup hitter Justin Morneau to a concussion in July.

He was the only manager named on all 28 ballots cast by Baseball Writers Association of America members. Washington received 10 first-place votes, while Maddon and Cito Gaston received one apiece. Voting was conducted at the end of the regular season, so the Twins being swept by the Yankees in the first round and the Rangers advancing to the World Series were not factors.

I’m far from the world’s biggest Gardenhire fan, but the notion that he could be deemed the second-best manager in the league five times in eight seasons without ever actually winning the award always struck me as fairly absurd and perhaps more than anything reinforced the idea that there’s really no clear, established criteria for picking a winner.

Did he do a better job than Washington or Maddon or Gaston or Francona? I don’t think anyone really knows the answer to that, but Gardenhire won 94 games minus two of his stars and certainly deserved the award as much as anyone this season. Mostly, though, it’s a tough award to really argue about objectively.