Tag: Red Sox


Clay Buchholz is healthy, aiming for 200-inning season


Some good news for Red Sox fans: Clay Buchholz is healthy, and he’s feeling so good that he’s hoping to top 200 innings for the first time in his career.

The right-hander, an All-Star in 2010, pitched only 82 2/3 innings in 2011 and missed more than half the season with a back injury. Boston fans have to wonder if the Red Sox could have avoided their stunning late-season collapse if Buchholz had been healthy, as he was quite effective when he pitched.

Now he’s hoping to rebound and surpass his career-high of 173 2/3 innings, as reported by Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe:

“I think it’s big. It’s what I want to do every time I come to spring training. It’s what I prepare myself to do,” Buchholz said. “The last two seasons came with injuries that I didn’t have any control over. It was frustrating in that aspect. But you can learn from everything. That’s what I’m coming into spring training with. Things happen and you have to take what you’re given sometimes.”

Among the other topics Buchholz discussed:

  • He, along with Dustin Pedroia, Jacoby Ellsbury and Darnell McDonald, had dinner with manager Bobby Valentine in January. Buchholz described Valentine as “a good dude” who is relaxed yet wants to have control over everyone. He meant that in a good way.
  • He also said the infamous clubhouse beer drinking had been going on for a while, and only became a big deal when the team fell apart. Buchholz did admit, however, that it was a mistake, and that Valentine will set a new tone.

You can follow Bob on Twitter here, or if Facebook is your thing, be his friend here.

Bobby Valentine isn’t exactly going to rule with an iron fist


Given how the Red Sox fell apart late last season under the light touch of nice-guy manager Terry Francona, it would be natural to assume that Bobby Valentine would come in wearing steel-toed boots, ready to stomp on any player who even thinks about calling Colonel Sanders.

That assumption would be wrong. From the sound of things, Valentine isn’t going to be like that at all. In fact, the new Boston manager is going to leave the players alone to police themselves. Surprised?

In an interview on the MLB Network, Bob Costas asks Valentine if something similar to what happened last season could repeat itself under his watch.

“I certainly hope not,” Valentine said. “And I hope that it’s not because the big bad policeman’s standing on the corner and monitoring everything that’s going on. I hope it’s a conscious effort of players, coaches, clubhouse men, trainers all being on the same page, all understanding the difference between right and wrong. And I think they all know.”

So basically, Valentine is going to treat the players like adults, which sounds scary on the surface. He’s going to let ownership and GM Ben Cherrington warn the players at the start of the season that past behaviors won’t be tolerated, then step in as the new guy and do his thing.

It might actually be the correct way to handle a veteran team, but given that Valentine oversaw a Mets team that was involved in plenty of clubhouse shenanigans, it’s got to be a bit disquieting for Red Sox fans.

You can watch a clip of the interview here, and Art Martone of CSN New England has several more goodies from the interview here, including Valentine’s take on the infamous mustache he wore in the dugout after being ejected from a game in 1999. (He blames Robin Ventura). Good stuff.

You can follow Bob on Twitter here, or if Facebook is your thing, be his friend here.

Red Sox finalize one-year deal with Hideki Okajima

Hideki Okajima
1 Comment

Last week Hideki Okajima was said to be close to re-signing with the Red Sox and now Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com reports that the two sides have finalized a one-year contract worth $1.75 million in guaranteed money and another $550,000 in potential incentives.

Boston non-tendered Okajima last month rather than pay what likely would have been around $3.5 million via the arbitration process, so in re-signing him the Red Sox probably end up saving at least $1.5 million.

Okajima had a miserable first half that included talk of being homesick and criticism from local reporters who felt he was dodging media responsibilities, but he allowed just two runs in his final 16 appearances to finish with a reasonable 4.50 ERA in 46 innings overall and will fill a left-handed setup role again in 2011.

Mike Cameron willing to accept fourth outfielder role in Boston

Mike Cameron outfield

Alex Speier of WEEI.com has a good article about Mike Cameron, who was signed to be the Red Sox’s starting center fielder last offseason and is now slated to be their fourth outfielder following an injury wrecked season and the Carl Crawford signing.

General manager Theo Epstein called Cameron before the Crawford deal was official to inform the veteran outfielder he was no longer likely to be a starter, yet a short time later Cameron still called Crawford to welcome him to Boston.

Cameron is under contract for $7.25 million this season, but his agent told Speier that he’s “not angling to leave the Red Sox just for the sake of more playing time elsewhere” and “has not requested a trade.”

Crawford, Jacoby Ellsbury, and J.D. Drew are the Red Sox’s projected starters, so right now Cameron’s role would likely be limited to starting in place of Ellsbury or Drew against some left-handed pitchers and stepping into the lineup when injuries hit. That would be a big change for a player who’s been a starting center fielder for the past 14 seasons, but if Cameron is indeed willing to accept a part-time role it would give the Red Sox a great fallback option following a season in which injuries tested the organization’s depth.

Red Sox claim Max Ramirez off waivers from Rangers

1 Comment

Last year at this time the Red Sox and Rangers were close to a deal that would have sent Mike Lowell (and some salary relief) to Texas for minor leaguer Max Ramirez, but the trade was nixed because Lowell needed thumb surgery in addition to his hip problems.

Lowell ended up staying in Boston and hit just .239 with a .674 OPS in 244 plate appearances as a part-time player, and today the Red Sox wound up with Ramirez anyway by claiming him off waivers from the Rangers.

Texas needed 40-man roster space after signing Adrian Beltre and Brandon Webb, and Ramirez is coming off an extremely disappointing season at Triple-A that saw him hit just .286 with three homers in 56 games.

Ramirez has put up some big numbers in the minors, but he’s been largely ineffective for the past two seasons, is already 26 years old, and reviews of his defense behind the plate suggest he’s more of a designated hitter than a catcher. Boston has clearly liked him for a while now and he’s certainly worth a waiver claim, but at the same time it’s tough to blame Texas for giving up on Ramirez.