Tag: Phil Bickford

James Kaprielian

2015 MLB Draft: Picks 11-18 – Indians take Brady Aiken at No. 17


No. 11 pick – Reds – high school catcher Tyler Stephenson

Stephenson was the only catcher expected to have much chance of going in the top half of round one. He was also a legitimate prospect as a pitcher, but everyone was looking at him as a catcher, where his big arm will remain an asset. He offers big-time power potential, but he probably won’t turn into a particularly well-rounded hitter.

No. 12 pick – Marlins – high school first baseman Josh Naylor

The first Canadian taken, Naylor might offer the greatest power potential in the draft. He’s expected to be limited to first base, and he might not be much of an asset there. He could also be a big strikeout guy. The Marlins obviously have dreams of him protecting Giancarlo Stanton in the lineup someday, but it won’t happen anytime soon. He doesn’t even turn 18 for another two weeks.

No. 13 pick – Rays – high school outfielder Garrett Whitley

The Rays badly need this pick to work out after missing on so many first-rounders of late. Of course, this is the earliest they’ve picked since they grabbed Tim Beckham first overall in 2008. Whitley is a strong defensive center fielder with plenty of speed, and his swing should provide him with power in time.

No. 14 pick – Braves – high school left-hander Kolby Allard

The Braves are going with a West Coast guy in the first round for the first time since 1995, when they took, but didn’t sign, future Stanford quarterback Chad Hutchinson. Allard entered the year as a potential top-five pick, but a stress reaction in his back suffered in March damaged his stock. He could be a tough sign as a UCLA commit.

No. 15 pick – Brewers – high school outfielder Trent Clark

A left-handed hitter, Clark should hit for average and show at least doubles power. He could have gone even higher if teams were convinced he’d stay in center field, but it’s possible he’ll end up in left. The Brewers already have Tyrone Taylor and Monte Harrison as center field hopefuls, so it wouldn’t be such a disaster if Clark needs to slide over.

No. 16 pick – Yankees – UCLA right-hander James Kaprielian

Kaprielian is the biggest pitcher drafted so far, standing 6-foot-4. He should be one of the quickest movers among college pitchers, though he probably doesn’t have the ceiling of a Carson Fulmer. He’s just a low-90s guy with his fastball, but he has four pitches and fine command for someone his age.

No. 17 pick – Indians – left-hander Brady Aiken

The first overall pick from the 2014 draft is off the board. Aiken underwent Tommy John surgery in March, so he won’t begin pitching in the minors until next summer. He was viewed by most as the top talent in last year’s draft, and if his stuff comes all of the way back, he could prove to be a steal for the Indians. Obviously, there’s plenty of risk, but it’s a risk worth taking, considering that plenty of “safer” picks in this range don’t pan out.

No. 18 pick – Giants – Southern Nevada right-hander Phil Bickford

Bickford was the 10th overall pick out of high school in 2013, but he opted not to sign with the Blue Jays. His stuff has been up and down, more due to mechanical issues than any physical problems. He’s thrown in the mid-90s and shown a plus slider at times, and if he puts it all together, he could prove to be an excellent starter in time. Some believe he’s more likely to wind up in the pen.

2014 MLB Draft: Picks 11-20 – Jays add catcher with second first-round pick

Max Pentecost

No. 11 pick: Blue Jays select Kennesaw State catcher Max Pentecost
This was a compensation pick for not signing Phil Bickford after drafting him 10th overall last year. Pentecost is a true catcher, but also a fine athlete with good speed. The questions about his bat kept him out of the top 10 tonight, but he could be a solid regular two or three years down the line. He did hit .423/.483/.631 this season, but that was against lesser competition in the Atlantic Sun Conference.

No. 12 pick: Brewers select high school LHP Kodi Medeiros
He’s the first Hawaiian high schooler to go in the first round since 2001. The Brewers have whiffed on a bunch of first-round picks the last five years — no one they’ve picked in the first or supplemental round since 2009 has reached the majors — and here’s another high-risk selection for them. Medeiros has a great arm, with a moving low-90s fastball and a big-breaking slider, but with an odd delivery and mediocre command, he’s a long shot to reach his ceiling.

No. 13 pick: Padres select NC State shortstop Trea Turner
Turner is a speedster with the ability to last at shortstop, but he’s likely to be more of a No. 7 or 8 hitter than someone who will be an asset at the top of the lienup. At least he should work out better than the last two middle infielders the Padres drafted in the top 20: Matt Antonelli in 2006 and Cory Spangerberg in 2010. He should move quickly through the farm system.

No. 14 pick: Giants select Vanderbilt left-hander Tyler Beede
Beede was the 21st overall pick by the Blue Jays in 2011, but he opted to head to Vandy rather than sign. He goes 13th overall despite having the weakest numbers of the Commodores’ primary starters this season, finishing 8-7 with a 3.20 ERA and a 106/43 K/BB in 98 1/3 innings. Still, there’s more upside here than one might expect with a college pitcher.

No. 15 pick: Angels select Hartford left-hander Sean Newcomb
Newcomb is a big lefty with a 91-95 mph fastball, and he went 8-2 with a 1.25 ERA and a 106/38 K/BB ratio in 93 1/3 innings for Hartford this year. Considering that he had little trouble overpowering rather weak college competition, the fact that he walked so many batters is rather discouraging. The talent is there for him to turn into something special, but he’s less polished than the college pitchers taken ahead of him.

No. 16 pick: Diamondbacks select high school right-hander Touki Toussaint
If Toussaint were a little bigger, he probably would have been right there with Brady Aiken and Tyler Kolek at the very top of the draft. As it was, his slight build probably worked against him, with teams wondering how he’ll hold up. He has an electric arm; he throws in the 90-95 mph range with the possibility of more velocity as he fills out and his curveball is outstanding.

No. 17 pick: Royals select TCU left-hander Brandon Finnegan
Finnegan isn’t big at 5’11” and 185 pounds, but he can throw in the mid-90s and has a quality changeup. Because of his size and some past shoulder troubles, some think he’ll wind up in the pen, and if the Royals want, they could get him to the majors in short order as a reliever. They’ll almost certainly groom him as a starter, though.

No. 18 pick: Nationals select UNLV right-hander Erick Fedde
Fedde gets taken two days after undergoing Tommy John surgery. The Nationals, though, have never been afraid of taking risks, and Fedde was a possible top-five guy before getting hurt. He throws in the low-90s with good command, and both his slider and changeup project as major league pitches. The Nats thought that was worth having stashed away, even if Fedde doesn’t pitch in a minor league game until 2016.

No. 19 pick: Reds select Virginia right-hander Nick Howard
Howard was the Cavaliers’ closer this season, saving 19 games with a 2.15 ERA and a 50/12 K/BB ratio in 29 1/3 innings. He throws 94-98 mph as a closer, but he is a former starter and the Reds will almost certainly take a look at him back in the rotation. What will be interesting to see is whether they try him as a reliever this year first. If so, he could be a factor in the majors in the second half of the season.

No. 20 pick: Rays select Wichita State first baseman Casey Gillaspie
Gillaspie, younger brother of White Sox third baseman Conor, hit .389/.520/.682 with 15 homers in 211 at-bats for the Shockers this season. He’s a switch-hitter with the swing to hit for both average and power. He’s not going to play anywhere other than first base, but the Rays obviously believe he has the bat to carry the position. They could certainly use a hit here after missing on so many first-rounders of late.

Blue Jays fail to sign No. 10 pick Phil Bickford

mlb draft board 2013

When asked yesterday Blue Jays general manager Alex Anthopoulos told reporters that he didn’t expect to sign first-round pick Phil Bickford and sure enough the signing deadline just passed without the deal.

Bickford, a high school pitcher from California who went No. 10 overall, will instead head to college at Cal-State Fullerton. The slot recommended bonus for the 10th pick is $2.9 million, although it’s not clear what the Blue Jays actually offered Bickford. He was considered a “tough sign” going into the draft, so the Blue Jays knew what they were getting into.

They’ll also receive the No. 11 pick in next year’s draft as compensation for failing to sign him, so it’s hardly a disastrous scenario. It could be for Bickford, though, depending on how he pitches in college and whether he can stay healthy for the next few years. Recent history has not been very kind to pitchers who passed up big signing bonuses coming out of high school.

Blue Jays unlikely to sign 10th overall pick Phil Bickford

mlb draft board 2013

When the Blue Jays drafted California high school right-hander Phil Bickford with the 10th overall pick last month Baseball America noted that he “could be a tough sign away from Cal State Fullerton.”

And now with the signing deadline 24 hours away Gregor Chisholm of MLB.com reports after speaking to general manager Alex Anthopoulos that the team “does not expect to sign” Bickford. Toronto radio announcer Mike Wilner adds that it’s “not about money,” suggesting that Bickford simply chose college over starting his professional career.

The recommended slot bonus for the No. 10 pick is $2.9 million, so assuming the Blue Jays were offering Bickford anything close to that he’s making a very bold choice to turn it down. And the Blue Jays will get the No. 11 pick in next year’s draft as compensation if he doesn’t sign.

Padres to sign first-round pick Hunter Renfroe

Hunter Renfroe
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Corey Brock of MLB.com reports that Padres first-round pick Hunter Renfroe is in San Diego today in order to take his physical, the final step before finalizing his contract.

Renfroe, a 22-year-old outfielder out of Mississippi State, was selected No. 13 overall in last month’s First-Year Player Draft. No word yet on the terms involved, but the recommended slot value for the pick is $2.678 million.

Here’s the write-up on Renfroe from our own Matthew Pouliot:

The first of the Hunters to go off the board, Renfroe is a toolsy right fielder with the power to hit balls out of Petco but also contact issues. He hit .352/.440/.634 with 15 homers for Mississippi State this year. He may not hit for a big average in the majors, but he could be a solid enough regular anyway. He’s the first outfielder taken in the top 15 by the Padres since Thomas Howard in 1986.

Assuming everything goes off without a hitch during Renfroe’s physical, that will leave Kris Bryant (Cubs – No. 2 overall), Colin Moran (Marlins – No. 6 overall), Phil Bickford (Blue Jays – No. 10 overall), and Aaron Judge (Yankees – No. 32 overall) as the only first-round picks unsigned from this year’s draft class.

UPDATE: Jim Callis of Baseball America reports that Renfroe will receive a $2,678,000 bonus, which matches the recommended slot value.