Tag: Nick Markakis

BALTIMORE, MD - JULY 27: Nick Markakis #22 of the Atlanta Braves acknowledges the crowd before his at bat in the first inning against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on July 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.  (Photo by Greg Fiume/Getty Images)

Video: Nick Markakis receives standing ovation in his return to Baltimore


After playing his first nine seasons in the majors as a member of the Orioles, Nick Markakis left Baltimore for a four-year, $44 million contract with the Braves last December. The veteran outfielder made his return to Oriole Park at Camden Yards tonight as a visitor and received a standing ovation from the appreciative Baltimore crowd before his first at-bat. Check it out below:

Very cool stuff from the fans. And also from the Orioles, who played Markakis’ old walk-up music.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

Albert Pujols

Angels 11, Red Sox 1; Angels 7, Red Sox 3: The Angels pick up their fourth and fifth wins in a row with lots of bombs helping the effort. Kole Calhoun, Albert Pujols and David Freese went long in game 1. In game 2 Pujols struck two more times, one of which pushed him past Mike Schmidt for 15th place all-time with his 549th career homer. He also took over the league lead from teammate Mike Trout who hit a measly one homer in the twin bill. Really, Trout, what’s wrong with you man? The Red Sox scored four runs in the four-game series, all coming in yesterday’s two games.

Nationals 7, Mets 2: The Nats didn’t have much trouble with Matt Harvey, who gave up five runs — four earned — on five hits in seven innings. The Mets left ten men on base and were 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position, which continued the pattern from Sunday’s 18-inning win. I suppose this will become a new hot button issue in the Mets’ press because the press LOVES to talk about teams who have trouble with runners in scoring position. The larger issue, however, is that hitters who aren’t very good don’t hit well with runners in OR out of scoring position.

Rockies 8, Rangers 7: A walkoff single for Rockies’ first baseman Ben Paulsen. In supplying a walkoff RBI single, a member of the Rockies who is otherwise anonymous to all but Colorado fans has a name. His name is Ben Paulsen. His name is Ben Paulsen. HIS NAME IS BEN PAULSEN. HIS NAME IS BEN PAULSEN.

Pirates 10, Royals 7: Travis Ishikawa has stunk on ice since the Pirates picked him up on waivers, but here he hit two doubles and a homer and drove in four runs. After the game he chalked it up to luck, saying that sometimes the pitcher makes a perfect pitch that still gets hit, sometimes the batter knocks the heck out of the ball but it still gets caught. He concluded by saying “tonight was just my night when the balls began to fall.” In other news, “When the Balls Began to Fall” sounds like, say, a second album from some moderately obscure alt-country guy who is a darling in the press but who can’t really connect with a larger audience. Hipsters like to say how much they like him even though “generally, [they] don’t care for country music. Except for Johnny Cash, of course.”

Phillies 5, Rays 3: David Buchanan won the game, allowing three runs on six hits in six and a third and then he was promptly sent down to Lehigh Valley because that’s the life of a fifth starter sometimes. Cesar Hernandez doubled, tripled and drove in two and Maikel Franco had a couple of hits and an RBI for the Phillies who have won four straight.

Tigers 5, Mariners 4: Ian Kinsler homered twice, the second of which was a go-ahead two-run shot in the eighth inning. The Tigers pulled back to .500. Though it may not matter. Come back to HBT later today as I’ll have the first of a three-part series about my recent visits to Detroit and a look at the Tigers as a team in transition.

Braves 7, Dodgers 5: Nick Markakis hit his first of the season. On July 20 which, well, OK. The Braves notched four runs and five hits in four innings off of their old friend Brandon Beachy, who was making his second post-Tommy John surgery start for L.A. Eury Perez threw out Adrian Gonzalez at the plate on a play that still counts as a nice one, even if Adrain Gonzalez is slower than your grandma:


Reds 5, Cubs 4: Three homers were hit by Reds batters — Todd Frazier, Jay Bruce and Marlon Byrd — with Frazier’s being his first that was not a part of a home run derby since last month. Not that it was all homers. Because this happened. Which, mercy:


Diamondbacks 3, Marlins 1: The Diamondbacks  snapped a six-game losing streak and gave the Marlins their fourth straight loss. So a lot of good stuff going on here. Shortstop Nick Ahmed had ten assists, some of them slicker than grease, and hit a triple as well. David Peralta drove in two.

Padres 4, Giants 2: Matt Kemp hit a two-run homer. Kemp 15-for-39 with 4 HR in his last 10 games. Guess he’s coming back to life, though it’s likely too little, too late.

Jon Lester loses his no-hitter with no outs in the eighth inning

Jon Lester

Update (9:39 PM EST): It’s over. Pierzynski, leading off the eighth inning, ripped a single into right field, exacting revenge for getting hit with a pitch earlier in the game.


Update (9:27 PM EST): Lester struck out Markakis and Jonny Gomes consecutively, then got Chris Johnson to ground out to third base to get through the seventh inning without issue. On to the eighth. Lester is at 97 pitches.


Cubs starter Jon Lester can thank a friendly Turner Field scorer for his ongoing no-hit bid against the Braves on Saturday night in Atlanta. As ESPN Stats & Info notes, the official scorer changed a first-inning hit by Nick Markakis to an error on third baseman Kris Bryant.

Lester has hit a batter (A.J. Pierzynski) and issued a walk while striking out five in his six innings of work.

The Cubs have given Lester two runs of support on RBI singles by Anthony Rizzo in the third inning and by Starlin Castro in the fourth.

We’ll keep you posted as Lester goes into the final third of the game in an attempt to complete the no-hitter. If he’s able to complete it, it would be the second of his career. His first came on May 19, 2008 when he was a member of the Red Sox facing the Royals.

Kyle Schwarber collects three hits, two errors in first start behind plate

Kyle Schwarber

Filling in for the injured Miguel Montero, Kyle Schwarber had three hits Friday in his return to the majors, but he also committed two errors in the Cubs’ 4-2 loss to the Braves.

Schwarber’s first error came a Nick Markakis steal in the bottom of the first, with his throw going to the outfield and allowing Markakis to take third. It was just Markakis’s second steal attempt in 89 games this season. He came around to score on Kelly Johnson’s single.

The other error came on catcher’s interference in the sixth, allowing Johnson to reach. Johnson didn’t go on to score.

Of course, the Cubs well know than Schwarber’s bat is well ahead of his glove. He had more than a third of the Cubs’ seven hits on the night, including their lone extra-base hit, a double off Julio Teheran in the fifth. Unfortunately, that came immediately after Dexter Fowler grounded into a double play, leaving no one on base.

The Cubs don’t believe Schwarber is ready to be an everyday catcher right now, which is why they’re carrying three backstops in Montero’s absence. However, they also haven’t given Schwarber a single inning in the outfield at any level this year, suggesting that Schwarber won’t contribute as more than a pinch-hitter when he doesn’t start at catcher. They still might want to change their minds about that one and start having Schwarber work out in left. If could take away from his practice time behind the plate, but Schwarber’s bat can be a big help to the team this year, even after Montero returns.

Braves’ John Hart: “I never made any false promises we were built to win this year”

John Hart

Braves President of Baseball Operations John Hart gave a particularly candid interview to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Especially in this day and age when GMs are partial to businesspeak that borders on cloudspeak.

Among the highlights was his response to a question that followed up on Hart talking about his expectations heading into the season:

Q: So it’s not as if you expected a better record.

A: I’ve never made any false promises that we were built to win this year. We felt we had an energy and a good makeup. But you don’t trade your closer opening day, trade for draft picks, trade middle-of-the-order bats and expect to win. I won’t lie to fans.

He is also pretty candid in saying how surprised he was that the Padres were willing to take Melvin Upton’s contract in the Craig Kimbrel trade:

Q: But was your only chance to get rid of B.J. Upton’s contract.

A: That was obviously the intent. We had 10 calls on Kimbrel in the winter, but we just hung up because they wouldn’t take an off-load. San Diego was one of the clubs that came up early.

Q: Did it shock you when they said they would take Upton?

A: Yeah, it did. They put all of their chips in.

Q: Like the Braves two years ago. It didn’t work for them, either.

A: Yeah, I know.

He’s also straight-forward in (a) calling out catcher Christian Bethancourt, who was supposed to be a big part of this year but who struggled and then got sent down, as unprepared and not evidently committed, thus resulting in his demotion; and (b) praising Fredi Gonzalez. Though, notably, he does not say whether or not Gonzalez, who is in his last year under contract, will be back in 2016.

I take issue with many of the things the Braves did this past offseason — particularly signing Nick Markakis, which Hart does not address here — but you have to hand it to Hart for giving straight-forward answers to questions most GMs would duck, dodge and spin.

Interesting interview.