Tag: Milton Bradley

bradley argues getty

Milton Bradley facing up to 13 years in prison from spousal abuse charges


Milton Bradley is done being a major league baseball player, but sadly he’s not done making headlines for (allegedly) doing terrible things.

Via TMZ.com:

The City Attorney’s Office has filed charges against Bradley stemming from 5 different incidents. The charges break down like this: 4 counts of spousal battery, 4 counts of criminal threats, 2 counts of assault with a deadly weapon, 2 counts of vandalism and 1 count of dissuading a witness from making a report.

As TMZ first reported, Milton’s wife Monique filed a domestic violence report with the LAPD back in November 2012 … claiming he tried to choke her, with 2 hands, when she asked him to stop smoking marijuana in front of their kids.  Bradley was arrested in August 2011 for allegedly attacking Monique with a bat, and in March 2012 he allegedly threatened her with a knife and said, “You’ll be dead bitch before you divorce me.”

He faces up to 13 years in prison.

Great news for the rest of the NL: Dodgers keep Ned Colletti around

Ned Colletti

Sure, these new Dodgers may have as much buying power as any three other National League teams combined, but at least fans of other clubs can take heart that Ned Colletti will remain the one doing the spending after inking a mulityear contract extension on Saturday.

Colletti’s Dodgers have the NL’s third-best record since he took over the team in 2006, trailing the Phillies and Cardinals, but they’ve been soundly beaten both times they’ve advanced to the NLCS. They’ve had one 90-win season, that partly fueled by a strong Manny Ramirez campaign in between drug suspensions.

Ignoring the huge 2012 moves for a minute, the Ramirez acquisition is the second biggest the highlight of Colletti’s first six years at the helm. After giving up just Andy LaRoche and Bryan Morris, the Dodgers got 223 games of a 1.012 OPS from Ramirez. They also got the baggage that came with it, and by the time mid-2010 rolled around, they were happy to see him gone.

The biggest highlight was Colletti’s first significant move in the offseason prior to 2006; Colletti landed Andre Ethier in exchange for Milton Bradley and Antonio Perez in a deal with the A’s. The Hiroki Kuroda signing from Japan is also right up there.

The worst moves:

1/14/2006: Traded Edwin Jackson and Chuck Tiffany to Tampa Bay for Danys Baez and Lance Carter

4/24/2006: Traded Cody Ross to Cincinnati for Ben Kozlowski

11/22/2006: Signed Juan Pierre to a five-year, $44 million contract

12/6/2006: Signed Jason Schmidt to a three-year, $47 million contract

12/6/2007: Signed Andruw Jones to a two-year, $36.2 million contract

7/26/2008: Traded Carlos Santana and Jon Meloan to Cleveland for Casey Blake

7/31/2010: Traded James McDonald and Andrew Lambo to Pittsburgh for Octavio Dotel

11/29/2010: Signed Juan Uribe to a three-year, $21 million contract

I suppose the good news there is that most of Colletti’s worst moves came early. However, it likely had something to do with the fact that Frank McCourt’s financial troubles left him with less flexibility in recent offseasons.

Ned hasn’t been all bad, but he has his old boss Brian Sabean’s fondness for veterans without Sabean’s genius in drafting pitchers (though he did get Clayton Kershaw in 2006). I think the Dodgers could do better, but now that they’ve shaped their team for years to come with the additions of Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford, Josh Beckett and Hanley Ramirez, perhaps the GM job there isn’t attractive as it would have seemed to be a couple of months ago.

Anyway, they’ve made their choice. But after such a huge outlay to upgrade the team, the organization will expect better on-field results next year. Even with an extension, Colletti’s contract is merely a drop in the bucket, and it shouldn’t buy him that much job security.

In  the meantime, fellow NL contenders should feel a bit better about things. Colletti can and will outspend everyone else and the Dodgers seem likely to remain contenders for years, but he’s probably not the guy to assemble any sort of juggernaut or dynasty.

Padres lose hot-hitting rookie catcher Yasmani Grandal to oblique injury

Yasmani Grandal AP

Rookie catcher Yasmani Grandal has provided a huge spark for the Padres since being called up on June 2, hitting .312 with five homers and a .947 OPS in 24 games, but now he’ll miss at least two weeks with a strained oblique muscle.

He’ll be eligible to return from the disabled list in the middle of the month, but oblique injuries have a tendency to linger. Normally the Padres would probably recall Nick Hundley from Triple-A to replace Grandal, as he was the starting catcher to begin the season, but because he’s on the disabled list with a hamstring injury John Baker and Eddy Rodriguez will split the action.

It’s only 24 games, of course, but Grandal’s production is pretty amazing for a rookie catcher calling pitcher-friendly Petco Park home. In fact, since the Padres moved into Petco Park in 2004 the only hitters to play at least 20 games and post a higher OPS than Grandal’s current mark are Milton Bradley in 2007, Scott Hairston in 2007, Russell Branyan in 2006, and Adrian Gonzalez in 2009.

Grandal came to the Padres from the Reds along with Yonder Alonso, Edinson Volquez, and Brad Boxberger for Mat Latos in December. Looks like a helluva trade for San Diego at this point.

The Cubs fire hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo

Cubs logo

The Chicago Cubs just announced that they have fired hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo. They have named James Rowson, their minor league hitting coordinator, as the interim major league hitting coach.

The Cubs hired Jaramillo away from the Texas Rangers following the 2009 season. He was given a three-year, $2.42 million contract which seemed kind of nuts for a hitting coach. Part of the appeal at the time was that he had just been with new free agent-signee Milton Bradley in Texas and it was thought that following him up to Chicago was a good idea. Hey, who knew?

Not that Jaramillo was purely a Milton Bradley Whisperer. He was well-respected as a hitting instructor for years, and it was felt that he’d be a good fit with the Cubs.  With an entirely new management team in place, however, and with his contract nearing its end, it seems likely that the Cubs just want to have someone in place who can work with the rebuilding program.