Tag: Mike Trout

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Video: Kevin Kiermaier takes to the sky to rob Manny Machado of a home run


You might remember that the catwalk at Tropicana Field got in the way of Kevin Kiermaier attempting to make a play on a Kendrys Morales fly ball on Friday night. He had no such problem tonight in Baltimore, robbing Manny Machado of a home run with an excellent leaping catch:

The play is reminiscent of Mike Trout’s leaping catch at Camden Yards from 2012, though it looks like Kiemaier jumped higher. The reaction of Chris Archer might be the best part. He appears to be a combination of relieved and awestruck. Rightfully so.

Kiermaier left tonight’s game in the third inning after the catch. We’ll pass along an update on his status when it’s made available.

UPDATE: Roger Mooney of the Tampa Tribune passes along word that Kiermaier suffered a mild right ankle sprain while making the catch. He’s considered day-to-day.

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

Jake Arrieta

Cubs 2, Dodgers 0: The second no-hitter against the Dodgers in 10 days, this one courtesy of Jake Arrieta. The best part of this is that the final inning required him to strike out two past-their-prime former Phillies stars. No, wait, the best part of this was not having to listen to Curt Schilling weigh in on it as it was happening. Arrieta, for what it is worth, is now 17-6 with a 2.11 ERA on the year. The only two guys in the NL who have as good or better a shot at him for the Cy Young Award this year were watching this from the opposing team’s dugout. Our coverage of the no-no can be read here and here.

And yes, he’s wearing pajamas in this pic. Joe Maddon had one of his crazy-Joe Maddon getaway dressup days he’s famous for, which is why Arrieta had to give interviews about the biggest moment of his professional life while wearing longjohns with mustaches on them.

Blue Jays 9, Tigers 2: Four more homers for the Blue Jays including another one from the on-fire Edwin Encarnacion. That gives the Jays 184 homers on the year. That’s seven more than they had as a team all last year and it ain’t even September yet. Russell Martin after the game:

“If this isn’t the feel of a championship team, I don’t know what is. I feel like we’re great offensively, we’re great on defense, we’re pitching great, our bullpen has depth. I like what we have going right now.”

If the baseball was a 19th century melodrama, now would be the time someone would contract a case of dreaded consumption. Or maybe a dark figure would emerge from the Blue Jays’ collective past to bring shame upon them in the community, forcing them to retire to a dark room in their mansion as recluses.

Mets 5, Red Sox 4: The Mets avert a sweep. Michael Cuddyer was 3-for-3 with a walk and singled in the go-ahead run in the seventh. Juan Uribe had a big hit too. If you knew nothing else about the Mets season and I told you a year ago that Uribe and Cuddyer would be big Mets offensive weapons in the second half of 2015 you’d probably assume they were 23 games out of first place or something, yet here they are.

Indians 9, Angels 2: Abraham Almonte hit a grand slam and Josh Tomlin was solid, leading the Indians to their fifth straight win. The Angels, meanwhile, have dropped three in a row, are at .500 and stand three and a half out of the second wild card position. On any other team people would be talking about Mike Scioscia being fired after the season, but I’d sooner expect Arte Moreno to force a Mike Trout trade than to see that happen.

Rays 3, Royals 2: The Rays salvage one against K.C. thanks in part to Brandon Guyer and Kevin Kiermaier homers. That was the first win by Tampa Bay over the Royals in the seven games they’ve played them this season.

Yankees 20, Braves 6: Well that was an ugly slaughter. You may think that this bothers me, but nah. I’m all-in on the Braves tanking the rest of year. They’re only two and a half games “behind” in the race for the number one pick next year. Yes, there are four teams “ahead” of them and it’s always hard to “climb” over that many teams in the season’s final month, but I have “confidence” in this “baseball team.”

Nationals 7, Marlins 4: Jayson Werth homered and drove in three and the Nats came back after being down by three to in by three. Three three three three.

Padres 9, Phillies 4: James Shields got the win. It was his first road win since May. Hey, I wouldn’t want to leave San Diego if I lived there either, so it’s hard to blame him. Matt Kemp, Justin Upton and Yangervis Solarte all hit homers as the Padres avoid a season sweep by the Phillies. Which would’ve been a somewhat more dubious proposition than the Rays being swept for the season by the Royals.

Rockies 5, Pirates 0: Jorge De La Rosa tossed six shutout innings and struck out seven. The Rockies scored their runs on a double, a triple and a two-run throwing error by Pirates pitcher Charlie Morton. That’s a homer, a single and a bases-loaded walk short of the dubious outing cycle.

White Sox 6, Mariners 5: The White Sox tied it in the ninth thanks in part to to a Brad Miller throwing error and than walked it off in the eleventh inning with a Tyler Saladino RBI single. David Robertson tossed two scoreless innings in relief and got the win. That’ll be the upper right hand story in the Closer Newsletter this week. Subscribers will be thrilled with that tale of transgression, adventure and the limits of human endurance.

Brewers 4, Reds 1: Wily Peralta pitched seven strong innings. Of course these days your aunt Tilly could pitch seven strong innings against the Reds. Do people have aunt Tillys anymore? Did they ever?

Twins 7, Astros 5: Ervin Santana struck out ten Astros in seven shutout innings and got the win even though his bullpen tried to sabotage him in the ninth, allowing a five-run Astros rally. Eduardo Nunez and Miguel Sano homered. Sano is hitting .287/.398/.591 on the year with 13 homers in only 49 games. That’s something like a 42 homer pace for a full season. Sano is 22-years-old.

Rangers 6, Orioles 0:Derek Holland is giving the Rangers exactly what they need as they push for the wild card. Here he struck out 11 in a three-hit complete game shutout. Baltimore is now closer to Boston and Detroit in the AL standings than they are to the second wild card.

Cardinals 7, Giants 5: Brandon Moss, Matt Carpenter and Mark Reynolds all hit homers as the Giants drop two of three to the Cardinals. A lot of people are talking about how the Dodgers are a struggling mess, and they sort of are, but the Giants aren’t exactly taking advantage of it.

Athletics 7, Diamondbacks 4: Marcus Semien hit a two-run bases loaded single with two outs in the top of the 11th. Pat Venditte, the switch-pitcher, got his first ever major league win.

Video: Eight-year-old boy meets hometown hero Mike Trout after major eye surgery

ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 26:  Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim rounds third base after hitting a home run in the first inning during a game against the Texas Rangers at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 26, 2015 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images)

Thomas Walkup is an eight-year old boy from Mike Trout’s hometown in Millville, New Jersey. He was legally blind due to a condition called “shaky eye syndrome,” but recently underwent major surgery in California and has begun to see more clearly. His trip to California was paid for thanks to a fundraising effort by the community. Trout’s mother, Debbie Trout, heard about Walkup’s story and had her son and the Angels reach out.

Walkup had a chance to meet his favorite player after his surgery in California. You can watch it below in a segment from “MLB Tonight” on MLB Network:

Great story. Well done by the Trouts and the Angels. Our best wishes to Walkup, who is one tough kid.

Justin Verlander loses no-hit bid in the ninth inning

Justin Verlander

It is August 26, 2015 and Justin Verlander has a no-hitter going against the Mike Trout-led Angels.

Verlander has issued just one walk and whiffed eight through seven innings of no-hit ball at Detroit’s Comerica Park. He’ll head into the eighth, just six outs away from a no-no, with a pitch count of 85.

Verlander struck out Kole Calhoun, Trout, and Albert Pujols in order in the top of the seventh.

This really might happen.


UPDATE, 9:36 p.m. ET: Verlander opened the top of the eighth with six straight balls, but he eventually got Erick Aybar to ground to second base for an easy double play. C.J. Cron grounded back to Tigers second baseman Ian Kinsler for the third out.

Verlander is three outs away with a pitch count of 100.


UPDATE, 9:55 p.m. ET: That’ll do it. Chris Iannetta roped a ball down the left field line — it actually kicked some white-painted grass into the air — to lead off the top of the ninth inning.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Houston Astros v New York Yankees

Astros 15, Yankees 1: The Astros beating the hell out of the Yankees is the secondary story here. The primary story is the benches clearing after the Yankees took issue with Carlos Gomez’s deportment. Sure, Gomez and Evan Gattis both homered and drove in four runs and sure Dallas Keuchel got his 15th win, but this happened too:


Which is absolutely dumb. The Yankees were mad at Gomez for being upset that he popped out. And after the game Joe Girardi actually said Gomez should “play the game the right” and to “show some professionalism.” This from the guy managing the bench where dudes not even playing in the game were barking at Gomez. Much the same came from Yankees catcher John Ryan Murphy — “there’s a right way and a wrong way to play the game,” he said. Dude is 24. We’ve covered that kind of thing a bunch of times around here and I’ll have a bigger post on it later, but it’s beyond stupid. If the behavior of a guy on a team with a big lead bugs you, maybe don’t get your asses beat so bad by that team and it’ll never come up. How about YOU play the game the right way? Like literally correctly and in a fashion where you aren’t losing by a ton and thus quick to anger at any perceived slight?

Nationals 8, Padres 3: The Nationals got some offense — a Ryan Zimmerman grand slam chief among them — and Stephen Strasburg allowed two runs over six. Entering play last night the Nationals were only a game or so closer to a playoff spot than the Padres by the way. And they didn’t make up any ground on the Mets because . . .

Mets 6, Phillies 5: . . . the wheels fell off for Jerome Williams and Jeanmar Gomez in the sixth inning allowing the Mets to rally. Things got testy here too when, in the seventh, Hansel Robles quick-pitched Darin Ruf, causing Jeff Francoeur and the Phillies to bark and Larry Bowa to get ejected. Bowa got his money’s worth too:


Quick pitch politics are far more rare than bat-flip and frustration politics. So rare, in fact, that not even everyone knows the rules. Get this:

“I was surprised they were mad about it,” Robles said through an interpreter. “The batter was in the box and the umpire pointed to me.”

Said [Terry] Collins, “Until they make the (quick) pitch illegal, you can do it.”

It is illegal, Terry!

Rule 8.01(b) Comment: With no runners on base, the pitcher is not required to come to a complete stop when using the Set Position. If, however, in the umpire’s judgment, a pitcher delivers the ball in a deliberate effort to catch the batter off guard, this delivery shall be deemed a quick pitch, for which the penalty is a ball. See Rule 8.05(e) Comment.

. . .

Rule 8.05(e) Comment: A quick pitch is an illegal pitch. Umpires will judge a quick pitch as one delivered before the batter is reasonably set in the batter’s box. With runners on base the penalty is a balk; with no runners on base, it is a ball. The quick pitch is dangerous and should not be permitted.

Oh well.

Angels 8, Tigers 7: Man, what got into everyone last night? Bad vibes all around. Jered Weaver was seen yelling in the dugout after Mike Trout lost a ball in the lights. He also hit a batter and, a couple batters later, it looked like Miguel Cabrera was sort of pointing at him and taunting although that wasn’t 100% clear. In any event, Weaver pitched poorly but good enough to win as the Angels blew a 4-0 lead but then piled four more on. And Trout atoned for that ball he lost in the lights:

Indians 11, Brewers 6: Michael Brantley homered twice and Josh Tomlin survived giving up three homers of his own and got his first win at Progressive Field in a dog’s age.

Rockies 5, Braves 1: Braves third baseman Adonis Garcia had a couple of big hits right after he came up. But between is defense and the impending arrival of Hector Olivera, his days are numbered. Nights in which he commits three errors allowing four unearned runs merely hasten that process along. It was Atlanta’s 12th loss in 15 games. Wheeeeeee!

Dodgers 5, Reds 1: The Dodgers snap a five-game losing streak thanks to Alex Wood taking a shutout into the sixth inning and JimmyRollins and Justin Turner each hitting two-run home runs. The Dodgers turned three double plays behind Wood too, making life easier.

Marlins 5, Pirates 2: Dee Gordon stole four bases, reaching on a couple of infield hits. He’s also still batting .333 on the year which I wouldn’t have guessed. Haven’t paid that much attention to him since his hot start and since the Marlins feel out of relevance early in the year. I’ll be damned. Our friend Old Gator pointed out to me that in the 7th inning the Marlins had a triple, a walk and four stolen bases – and they scored zero runs that inning. That’s pretty hard to do, one assumes.

Twins 11, Rays 7: That’s five straight wins for the Twins, who are only a half game out of the wild card. Brian Dozier, Miguel Sano and Eddie Rosario homered.

Blue Jays 6, Rangers 5: Down by one in the ninth the Blue Jays rallied for two and the win. Troy Tulowitzki had three hits, including the game-tying RBI single in the ninth. The go-ahead run scored on an Adrian Beltre throwing error. Which, man, you don’t see that sort of thing happen too dang often.

White Sox 5, Red Sox 4: Sox win. Trayce Thompson drove in three runs. He was a homer shy of the cycle. He was called up at the beginning of the month and has gone 12-for-23 in part time play. The White Sox rattled off 15 hits in all.

Royals 3, Orioles 2: Kansas City had a 3-0 lead after three innings and it held up. Leads hold up, even early leads with small margins, when you got Luke Hochevar, Kelvin Herrera and Wade Davis going for you. They didn’t even need Greg Holland. Ho-hum, Kansas City fans say, when do the playoffs start?

Cardinals 9, Diamondbacks 1: A four-run first inning was all the Cardinals needed. Tommy Pham singled twice and tripled, scoring three times. The Cards win their 80th game.

Mariners 6, Athletics 5: Oakland blew an early 5-0 lead. Robinson Cano doubled. According to the Associated Press, he became the first player to have at least 30 doubles in his first 11 seasons in the major leagues, passing Albert Pujols. In a year where you’re hitting .277, I suppose any accomplishment is worth celebrating.

Cubs 8, Giants 4: Jake Arrieta allowed only an unearned run over six innings, lowering his ERA to 2.22 and notching his 16th win on the year. Not that he needed to be so good as he had an 8-0 lead by the time the sixth inning rolled around. Kyle Schwarber homered. He does that a lot.