Tag: Miguel Tejada

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 19:  Alex Rodriguez #13 of the New York Yankees hugs teammate CC Sabathia #52 after hitting a solo home run in the first inning for his 3,000th career hit against the Detroit Tigers at Yankee Stadium on June 19, 2015 in the Bronx borough of New York City.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)

Who will be the next player to join the 3,000-hit club?


Last night, Alex Rodriguez became the 29th player in MLB history to join the 3,000-hit club. He’s the first player to reach the milestone since former teammate Derek Jeter on July 9, 2011.

After Jeter reached 3,000, I attempted to make a guess about who would be next. I went with Rodriguez, but figured he would get there in 2013. I was only off by two years. His hip surgery and year-long PED suspension obviously pushed back that timeline significantly. Still, better late than never. Rodriguez reaching 3,000 hits almost seemed like a longshot a year ago.

Who will be next to reach 3,000 hits? Removing Rodriguez from the mix, here’s the list of the current active leaders in hits (their ages in parentheses):

Ichiro Suzuki (41) – 2,886
Adrian Beltre (36) – 2,657
Albert Pujols (35) – 2,587
Miguel Tejada (41) – 2,407
Torii Hunter (39) – 2,386
Carlos Beltran (38) – 2,373
Jimmy Rollins (36) – 2,353
Miguel Cabrera (32) – 2,268
Aramis Ramirez (37) – 2,230
David Ortiz (39) – 2,211

Not surprisingly, the great majority of these players are toward the end of their respective careers. Tejada is still technically active, but we can effectively scratch him off as a possibility. Similarly, it’s highly unlikely that Ortiz, Ramirez, Rollins, Beltran, and Hunter will get there.

That leaves Suzuki, Beltre, Pujols, and Cabrera as our best options. Suzuki has played well in a part-time role with the Marlins this season, but he has only had 42 hits. Let’s say he can double that the rest of the way. That would put him at 2,928 hits, just 72 away from the milestone. The Marlins have reportedly had internal discussions about bringing Ichiro back for 2016, which makes sense given that they could market his chase. I think he’ll be the next to reach the milestone if he decides to come back.

Beltre and Pujols are both still young enough where 3,000 is within reach. Beltre is currently sidelined with a thumb injury and his .257/.294/.408 batting line isn’t on par with his usual lofty standards, but he likely has some productive seasons left in him and 343 hits doesn’t feel like a stretch here. However, he appears unlikely to get there until at least 2017. Pujols is 413 hits away and while he’s not putting up the monster numbers we saw during his peak with the Cardinals, he’s still very good. Keep in mind that he’s under contract through 2021. Barring injury, he’ll get there eventually.

Cabrera, is the closest thing we have to a lock on this list. He has averaged 191 hits per season since 2004 and has showed no signs of slowing down since his offseason foot surgery, leading the American League in batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage, and OPS this season. He doesn’t turn 33 until next April and appears poised to blow well past 3,000 if he can remain healthy. Still, he wouldn’t figure to get there anytime before 2018.

Rafael Furcal announces his retirement after 14 seasons

Rafael Furcal Braves

Three-time All-Star shortstop Rafael Furcal has decided to retire at age 37 after injuries derailed numerous comeback attempts in recent years.

Furcal debuted for the Braves in 2000, winning the Rookie of the Year award, and spent the next decade as one of the league’s best all-around shortstops, but he last topped a .700 OPS in 2011 and has played a grand total of just nine games in the big leagues since 2013.

A switch-hitting, 5-foot-8 speedster with good on-base skills and a rocket arm, Furcal batted .281 with a .346 on-base percentage and .402 slugging percentage in 1,614 games, stealing 314 bases and smacking 113 home runs.

Among all MLB shortstops since 2000 he ranks fourth in Wins Above Replacement with 39.0, trailing only Derek Jeter, Jimmy Rollins, and Miguel Tejada. He played 14 seasons for the Braves, Dodgers, Cardinals, and Marlins, earning $97 million in salary and winning one World Series with St. Louis in 2011.

Ron Washington wants back in baseball

Texas Rangers v Cleveland Indians

Last September, Ron Washington abruptly resigned as Rangers manager, citing a need to work on his marriage as a result of an extramarital affair. Now he tells the New Orleans Advocate that he wants back in the game. It’s not going well, however:

He has had a difficult time getting major league teams to care. He’s reached out to a few teams, he said, but hasn’t gotten a response. Washington, who built his reputation as an infield instructor, developing Gold Glove players with the Oakland Athletics such as six-time winner Eric Chavez and shortstop Miguel Tejada, said he would just like to get back in the game.

“My whole presence is just to help, and I have a passion for baseball,” he said. “So, if that’s managing, certainly. If that’s as a third base coach, certainly. If it’s a roving instructor, wherever the game has to offer, I have something to offer the game.”

Washington’s resignation was sudden, unexpected and, given that he had already weathered the revelation of his cocaine use several years prior, somewhat surprising. Having won two pennants and clearly having the trust of the Rangers’ organization suggests that, if Washington needed time to sort things out, the club would’ve allowed him to do so short of his resignation.

But somewhat less surprising is the trouble Washington is having getting back in the game. Baseball gives a lot of second (and third and fourth and . . .) chances, but it seems particularly difficult for managers who quit their jobs, whatever the reason. I’m put in mind of Mike Hargrove, who quit his job as the Mariners manager in the middle of the 2007 season citing stress. Or Jim Riggleman who quit his job as Nationals manager in 2011 in the middle of a contract dispute. Hargrove has had some invites to spring training and various minor baeseball titles. Riggleman has managed in the minors since. Neither has had a chance to manager in the bigs again.

Washington is well-liked in the game and, in the linked articles, says he’s not hung up on managing but, rather, would be a roving instructor, base coach or the like. One hopes that, assuming his personal issues are behind him, someone would be willing to give a job to a guy who has always had success in what he’s done and who is well-liked in and around the game.

Chris Davis suspended 25 games for amphetamine use

chris davis getty

Orioles first baseman/third baseman Chris Davis has been suspended 25 games by MLB after testing positive for amphetamines. The suspension is effective immediately and includes the playoffs in addition to the Orioles’ final 17 regular season games.

Davis had a career-year in 2013, hitting .286 with a league-leading 53 homers and 138 RBIs on the way to finishing third in the MVP balloting, but he’s been a mess this season with a .196 batting average and league-high 173 strikeouts in 127 games while his OPS has dropped 300 points.

Suspensions for amphetamines have been common in recent years, mostly among minor leaguers. Cameron Maybin of the Padres was suspended 25 games for amphetamines in July and other big leagues to receive amphetamine-based suspensions recently include Carlos Ruiz of the Phillies, Miguel Tejada of the Marlins, and Troy Patton of the Orioles.

Davis said in a statement that he will not appeal the suspension, so he’d be available for the Orioles’ ninth playoff game if they make it past the opening round. Here’s the rest of his statement:

I apologize to my teammates, coaches, the Orioles organization and especially the fans. I made a mistake by taking Adderall. I had permission to use it in the past, but do not have a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) this year. I accept my punishment and will begin serving my suspension immediately.

If accurate, Davis got suspended for taking something MLB allowed him to take last season and players on every MLB roster are similarly allowed to take this season.

Nelson Cruz, baseball’s $8 million man, ends May at 20 HR, 52 RBI

Baltimore Orioles v Toronto Blue Jays

Nelson Cruz was jobless into the month of February, after spring training had already begun. Cruz had rejected the Rangers’ $14.1 million qualifying offer back in November, and remained unsigned through the winter because of the draft pick compensation to which he was attached. Finally, the Orioles relented, signing him to a one-year, $8 million deal on February 22.

Just over three months later, Cruz is baseball’s home run and RBI leader with 20 and 52, respectively. Cruz ended the month of May with a home run and three runs batted in against the Astros, and is slashing a cool .315/.383/.675. If not for Blue Jays first baseman Edwin Encarnacion, Cruz would be a frontrunner for AL Player of the Month honors, as he has belted 13 home runs and knocked in 27 runs in May. Encarnacion is at 16 and 33 on the month, respectively.

As our own Drew Silva pointed out on Twitter, Cruz is on pace for 60 HR and 156 RBI. Should he keep it up, he would set the Orioles’ club record for RBI in a single season, surpassing Ken Williams’ 155 in 1922 with the St. Louis Browns. Miguel Tejada holds the modern Orioles record with 150 in 2002. Chris Davis drove in 138 last season.