Michael Young

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Michael Young will not be the Rangers’ next manager

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Dallas Morning News columnist Evan Grant has the story

The Rangers search for a new manager will not include Michael Young.

During a conversation with GM Jon Daniels Tuesday about the position, Young decided against pursuing the position.

Young clashed with Daniels during the end of his 13-year tenure as a player for the Rangers, but the two patched things up earlier this year at a wedding and Daniels told the media after Ron Washington’s sudden resignation that he had a “lot of respect for Michael” and would consider all options in his still-ongoing search for a replacement.

But, as Grant writes Tuesday, the 37-year-old Young has three young sons and wants to spend more time with his family than a major league managerial position would allow: “I’m honored to be considered for the position of Rangers’ manager,” Young told Grant. “I appreciate everything the Rangers organization has meant and done for me, my career, and my family.  Having said that, I recognize the immense time commitment a manger’s position requires, and at this point in my life, it’s not the right fit.  I retired to spend more time with my family and I’m enjoying this chapter in my life.”

Let the “Michael Young for Rangers manager” stumping begin

Michael Young dugout
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As soon as Ron Washington stepped down I thought “it’s only a matter of time until someone says Michael Young should be the next Rangers manager.” Out of respect for Wash, I assume, they gave it a week. Now Richard Justice begins the stumping:

Young knows that the game is not easy, and because he had an awareness of the people around him, he would know that every player isn’t going to care as much as he cared. He was a leader in a quiet way, a guy who led more by example, but would also say what needed to be said. He was universally respected by his managers and teammates alike . . .

. . . With Rangers’ home attendance down for a third straight year, with it off almost 700,000 from two years ago, the Rangers need to do more than simply hire a competent manager. They need someone to inspire confidence in fans. Young is the only potential replacement for Washington who could instantly win over the fan base.

While Young would no doubt be respected by players, it’s also the case that he and Jon Daniels clashed on multiple occasions when Young was with the Rangers, with the discord that led to Young’s position-change dramas often being defended by Young partisans as a function of Daniels undercutting Young and not being straight with him. I have no idea if that’s true. For what it’s worth, Justice says Young and Daniels patched things up “at a wedding last summer.”

But in this day and age a GM wants a manager who will be his guy, no questions asked. Not a guy who can appeal to his own constituency in the press or among fans in such a way that, if the GM and he clash, the GM is undermined. That dynamic ended up causing riffs with Nolan Ryan and Daniels. Justice compares Young to Ryan in several places in this column. You think Daniels wants any part of that again?

There is a lot of talk about “optics” and washing away all of the bad news the Rangers have had in the past couple of years. Winning baseball games washes that stuff way more thoroughly than a nice press conference and a few stories about how Michael Young has “come home.”

(thanks to Caheezy for the heads up)

Troy Tulowitzki says he’ll retire before he switches positions

Troy Tulowitzki
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Patrick Saunders of the Denver Post writes about Troy Tulowitzki and his plethora of injuries over the years. The sorts of injuries which, historically speaking, tend to cause players to have to move from more demanding defensive positions to less demanding ones. And shortstop is pretty darn demanding. Here’s what Tulo says about the possibility of having to change positions:

“No, I won’t move,” he said in a phone interview. “I will retire before I move.”

Not to third base? Not to first base, a position that could save him from wear and tear and possibly prolong his career?

“No. It’s just who I am, it’s what I do, it’s what I have dreamed of as a kid,” said Tulowitzki, 29. “It’s all I know and it’s all I’ve ever worked for. So I guess when you have a dream and you accomplish it and someone tries to take it away from you … it wouldn’t be worth it for me to try and move somewhere else.”

We all had dreams when we were kids. I was going to be a sports writer — wait, bad example.

Point is, if the time comes when the Rockies or whoever employs Tulowitzki decide that his highest and best use is as, say, a second or third baseman, such an attitude probably won’t play well. The only guy around who is allowed to play shortstop years after better options presented themselves for his team is Derek Jeter. And he had four World Series rings before that became an issue. More often than not, the Michael Young situation applies: you may want to play short, but it’s a team game and even the big stars move off short when better options are available.