Michael Dunn

Lorenzo Cain

54 players exchange figures with their clubs following today’s deadline

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Today was the deadline for teams and players to exchange salary figures in an attempt to avoid arbitration hearings beginning February 1 and ending on the 21st. Players and teams can still work out a deal over the next two weeks.

Here’s a rundown of all of the filings from the players and their respective teams:

[Update: The original count had 56 players but two players were incorrectly left on the list after avoiding arbitration.]

Angels (3)

  • David Freese (3B) filed for $7.6 million, team filed for $5.25 million (source)
  • Matt Joyce (OF) filed for $5.2 million, team filed for $4.2 million (source)
  • Garrett Richards (SP) filed for $3.8 million, team filed for $2.4 million (source)

Astros (2)

  • Dexter Fowler (OF) filed for $10.8 million, team filed for $8.5 million (source)
  • Marwin Gonzalez (SS) filed for $1.4 million, team filed for $900,000 (source, source)

Athletics (4)

  • Fernando Abad (RP) filed for $1.225 million, team filed for $850,000 (source)
  • Tyler Clippard (RP) filed for $8.85 million, team filed for $7.775 million (source)
  • Jarrod Parker (SP) filed for $1.7 million, team filed for $850,000 (source)
  • Eric Sogard (2B) filed for $1.425 million, team filed for $900,000 (source)

Blue Jays (2)

  • Josh Donaldson (3B) filed for $5.75 million, team filed for $4.3 million (source)
  • Danny Valencia (3B) filed for $1.675 million, team filed for $1.25 million (source)

Braves (1)

  • Mike Minor (SP) filed for $5.6 million, team filed for $5.1 million (source)

Cardinals (1)

  • Jon Jay (OF) filed for $5.0 million, team filed for $4.1 million (source)

Cubs (1)

  • Pedro Strop (RP) filed for $3.0 million, team filed for $2.0 million (source)

Diamondbacks (2)

  • Addison Reed (RP) filed for $5.6 million, team filed for $4.7 million (source)
  • Mark Trumbo (OF) filed for $6.9 million, team filed for $5.3 million (source)

Giants (4)

  • Brandon Belt (1B) filed for $4.5 million, team filed for $3.0 million (source)
  • Gregor Blanco (OF) filed for $4.0 million, team filed for $3.3 million (source)
  • Brandon Crawford (SS) filed for $3.95 million, team filed for $2.4 million (source)
  • Casey McGehee (3B) filed for $5.4 million, team filed for $4.0 million (source)

Mariners (1)

  • Tom Wilhelmsen (RP) filed for $2.2 million, team filed for $1.4 million (source)

Marlins (3)

  • Michael Dunn (RP) filed for $2.6 million, team filed for $2.355 million (source)
  • Mat Latos (SP) filed for $10.4 million, team filed for $9.4 million (source)
  • David Phelps (SP) filed for $1.875 million, team filed for $1.4 million (source)

Mets (2)

  • Lucas Duda (1B) filed for $4.7 million, team filed for $3.75 million (source)
  • Jenrry Mejia (RP) filed for $3.0 million, team filed for $2.1 million (source)

Nationals (1)

  • Jerry Blevins (RP) filed for $2.4 million, team filed for $2.2 million (source)

Orioles (6)

  • Zach Britton (RP) filed for $4.2 million, team filed for $2.2 million (source)
  • Alejandro De Aza (OF) filed for $5.65 million, team filed for $5 million (source)
  • Ryan Flaherty (IF) filed for $1.5 million, team filed for $900,000 (source)
  • Miguel Gonzalez (SP) filed for $3.95 million, team filed for $2.5 million (source)
  • Bud Norris (SP) filed for $10.25 million, team filed for $7.5 million (source)
  • Steve Pearce (1B) filed for $5.4 million, team filed for $2 million (source)

Pirates (3)

  • Pedro Alvarez (1B) filed for $5.75 million, team filed for $5.25 million (source)
  • Neil Walker (2B) filed for $9.0 million, team filed for $8.0 million (source)
  • Vance Worley (RP) filed for $2.45 million, team filed for $2.0 million (source)

Rangers (1)

  • Mitch Moreland (DH) filed for $3.35 million, team filed for $2.75 million (source)

Red Sox (2)

  • Wade Miley (SP) filed for $4.3 million, team filed for $3.4 million (source)
  • Daniel Nava (OF) filed for $2.25 million, team filed for $1.3 million (source)

Reds (3)

  • Aroldis Chapman (RP) filed for $8.7 million, team filed for $6.65 million (source)
  • Todd Frazier (3B) filed for $5.7 million, team filed for $3.9 million (source)
  • Devin Mesoraco (C) filed for $3.6 million, team filed for $2.45 million (source)

Rockies (2)

  • Adam Ottavino (RP) filed for $1.475 million, team filed for $1.0 million (source)
  • Wilin Rosario (C) filed for $3.3 million, team filed for $2.8 million (source)

Royals (7)

  • Lorenzo Cain (OF) filed for $3.6 million, team filed for $2 million (source)
  • Danny Duffy (SP) filed for $3.0 million, team filed for $1.75 million (source)
  • Jarrod Dyson (OF) filed for $1.6 million, team filed for $900,000 (source)
  • Kelvin Herrera (RP) filed for $1.9 million, team filed for $1.15 million (source)
  • Greg Holland (RP) filed for $9 million, team filed for $6.65 million (source)
  • Eric Hosmer (1B) filed for $6.7 million, team filed for $4.6 million (source)
  • Mike Moustakas (3B) filed for $3.1 million, team filed for $1.85 million (source)

Tigers (1)

  • Al Alburquerque (RP) filed for $2.05 million, team filed for $1.375 million (source)

Twins (2)

  • Brian Duensing (RP) filed for $3.1 million, team filed for $2.4 million (source)
  • Jordan Schafer (OF) filed for $1.7 million, team filed for $1.4 million (source)

Last year, 40 players exchanged figures with their respective teams.

The Orioles had the two biggest disparities, ending up $3.4 million apart with Steve Pearce ($5.4M vs. $2M) and $2.75 million apart with Bud Norris ($10.25M vs. $7.5M).

Winners and losers at the trade deadline

Jake Peavy
42 Comments

Given how disappointing this afternoon’s trade deadline proved to be, it’s only fair that the annual winners and losers column is a little lopsided. Let’s get right to it:

Winners

Red Sox: I didn’t like the idea of Boston giving up top prospects for Jake Peavy because I just didn’t see him being a big upgrade over the rest of their candidates for the postseason rotation. Parting with Jose Iglesias for him, on the other hand, is something I can get behind. Iglesias had an incredible run for the Red Sox earlier this season, but he was a lifetime .257/.307/314 hitter in the minors. He had a .588 OPS in 829 Triple-A at-bats.  And while he was still at .330 for Boston this season, he had returned to earth in a big way this month, batting .205/.247/.217 in 83 at-bats during July. I think Iglesias will be a useful regular for a long time, but for a big-spending team like the Red Sox, he was always going to be expendable. They sold high when they sent him to Detroit in the three-team swap.

Angels: Getting Grant Green from the A’s for Alberto Callaspo was a nice little coup. Green is 25 and still doesn’t have a position, which is a problem, but he’s also hit .325/.379/.500 in Triple-A this year. The Angels should start working him out at third. Some will argue that the Angels should have moved Howie Kendrick and Erick Aybar as well, but I’m not so sure. Both have reasonable contracts, and the Angels almost certainly would have downgraded had they tried to replace either in free agency this winter. They would have needed a big return to justify dealing either.

Braves: Many wanted the Braves to get a starter with Tim Hudson out. I think they’re just fine with a front six of Mike Minor, Kris Medlen, Julio Teheran, Paul Maholm, Brandon Beachy and Alex Wood. And getting the perpetually underrated Scott Downs from the Angels for Cory Rasmus was nice. I’m not positive how he does it, but Downs has a 1.76 ERA again this year. Last year’s 3.15 mark was his worst since 2006, and that was really the result of two bad weeks (nine of the 16 runs he allowed came in a stretch of five appearances).

Cardinals: The slumping Cardinals failed to add, but the important thing for them is that the Pirates and Reds didn’t make any additions, either. St. Louis is still the NL Central’s best team on paper, provided that Yadier Molina isn’t out for much more than the minimum 15 days with his sprained knee. All bets are off if his absence extends into September.

Cubs: The lack of action on Wednesday suggests that the Cubs were smart to move Matt Garza, Scott Feldman and Alfonso Soriano when they did. They clearly got a better return for Garza, a free agent at season’s end, than the White Sox did for Peavy, even though Peavy is locked up for another year.

Dodgers: Drew Butera, yo. But, no, the Dodgers are here for the same reason as the Cardinals. Maybe the Diamondbacks engaged in some addition by subtraction in shedding Ian Kennedy, but they didn’t do much addition by addition.

Losers

Mariners: Kendrys Morales, Oliver Perez, Michael Morse, Raul Ibanez and Joe Saunders are all going to be free agents this winter, and the 50-56 Mariners, remaining stubborn under GM Jack Zduriencik’s guidance, didn’t cash any of them in. Morales and Perez would have brought significant returns. At least some of the other teams that declined to sell could have chances to get deals done in August, but I’m not sure any of the Mariners listed above will clear waivers, limiting the team’s options.

Royals: Winners of seven in a row to move to 52-51 on the season, the Royals refused to sell. Which is understandable. But the fact that they did choose to buy, acquiring outfielder Justin Maxwell from the Astros, and still didn’t land an upgrade from Chris Getz at second base is tough to take. It’s not like they needed a star; they’ve gotten so little production from second base for years now that just about anything would have done.

Indians: One of the rumors going around Wednesday was that the Indians were aiming for a big-time starter. Instead, they stayed quiet; their only deadline pickup was lefty reliever Marc Rzepczynski, who was unwanted by the Cardinals. Something to energize the fanbase in Cleveland would have been welcome; the Indians have the AL’s sixth-best record, so they’re right in the thick of things.

Blue Jays: The Blue Jays could have cashed in closer Casey Janssen and turned a tidy profit. They also had a couple of nice role players in Emilio Bonifacio and Rajai Davis to dangle. They did nothing.

White Sox: The White Sox’s top picks in the 2009, 2011 and 2012 drafts were outfielders (Chris Sale was the choice in 2010). Baseball America said their No. 1, No. 2 and No. 5 prospects at the start of the season were outfielders. Yet when they chose to deal Peavy, they did it for another outfielder, getting Avisail Garcia from the Tigers. They also dealt Matt Thornton to Boston for an outfielder (Brandon Jacobs) earlier in the month. In the abstract, I don’t mind Peavy for Garcia. It’s decent value. The White Sox, though, have questions throughout the infield and a dearth of young pitching in the minors. I’m not sure what they’re building.

Phillies: Ruben Amaro Jr. is still likely shocked and appalled that no team was willing to surrender two top prospects for Michael Young. The Michael Young.

Marlins: OK, so the Marlins didn’t put Giancarlo Stanton on the block yet. That’s fine. But then they wouldn’t talk about relievers Steve Cishek and Michael Dunn. Even more incredibly, they weren’t even interested in picking up a prospect for a 34-year-old Chad Qualls today. The only thing I can figure is that the commissioner’s office and the MLBPA is back whispering in the Marlins’ ears about their use of revenue sharing money.

Giants: The flagging Giants had a chance to refuel the farm system a bit, which could have been a silver lining in a very disappointing season. Instead, they held on to Hunter Pence, Tim Lincecum and even Javier Lopez. Maybe they’ll get compensation picks if Pence and Lincecum leave as free agents or maybe they’ll even deal Lincecum in August, but with plenty of contenders looking for a middle-of-the-order bat and starting pitching, it’s disappointing that they resisted overtures.

Astros clubhouse attendants: Good luck with those end-of-season tips. With Bud Norris, Carlos Pena and Jose Veras gone, Erik Bedard in now the highest-paid Astro at $1.15 million this season. That’s about what Alex Rodriguez makes per week.

What does Dave Winfield think about Ichiro wearing his number?

Dave Winfield
31 Comments

This is what he thinks:

Bob Wickman, Javier Vazquez and Hensley “Bam Bam” Muelens beg to differ.

For that matter so do Jim Wright, Roy Sherid,  Charles O’Leary, Jimmy Burke, Cy Perkins, Jim Burke, John Schulte, Art Fletcher, Red Rolfe, John Corriden, Jim Turner, Johnny Sain, Jim Gleeson, Cot Deal, Mel Wright, Ed Figueroa, Jeff Torborg, Brian Dorsett, Mike Humphreys, Frank Tanana, Xavier Hernandez, Brian Boehringer, Tim Raines, Dan Naulty, Lance Johnson, Ben Ford, Glenallen Hill, Steve Karsay, Aaron Small, Jason Anderson, Jose Veras, Josh Phelps, Edwar Ramirez, Ian Kennedy, Michael Dunn and Pedro Feliciano.

Running down the rosters: Miami Marlins

Marlins Spring Baseball
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The hopes are high with LeBron James having one of the greatest statistical seasons in NBA history and the Dolphins potentially landing Peyton Manning or Matt Flynn as their new quarterback. Also, the baseball team has a new name, a new stadium and a new star shortstop. Let’s see if that does the Marlins any good.

Rotation
Josh Johnson – R
Mark Buehrle – L
Anibal Sanchez – R
Ricky Nolasco – R
Carlos Zambrano – R

Bullpen
Heath Bell – R
Edward Mujica – R
Michael Dunn – L
Ryan Webb – R
Randy Choate – L
Steve Cishek – R
Wade LeBlanc – L

Restricted list: Juan Oviedo (R)
SP next in line: Brad Hand (L), LeBlanc, Alex Sanabia (R), Sean West (L)
RP next in line: Jose Ceda (R), Chris Hatcher (R), Chad Gaudin (R), Sandy Rosario (R)

Along with their $106 million outlay for Jose Reyes, the Marlins spent $58 million on Buehrle and $27 million on Bell, adding stability to a staff that has lacked it for several years. Buehrle won’t contend for a Cy Young, but he’ll be at least a bit above average over the course of 200 innings. Bell’s best years are probably behind him, but he figures to be a quality closer for at least a couple of more years.

The Marlins have plenty of upside elsewhere. Johnson would be a legitimate Cy Young contender if he could stay healthy. Sanchez has posted an ERA in the mid-3.00s each of the last two years. If  those two combine to make 60 starts and either Nolasco or Zambrano can rebound (probably too much to expect both to do so), then the Marlins would be definite threats for the wild card.

Lineup
SS Jose Reyes – S
CF Emilio Bonifacio – S
3B Hanley Ramirez – R
RF Mike Stanton – R
LF Logan Morrison – L
1B Gaby Sanchez – R
C John Buck – R
2B Omar Infante – R

Bench
C Brett Hayes – R
1B-3B Greg Dobbs – L
INF Donnie Murphy – R
OF Scott Cousins – L
OF Aaron Rowand – R

Next in line: C Clint Sammons (R), 3B Matt Dominguez (R), INF Nick Green (R), INF Gil Velazquez (R), OF Austin Kearns (R), OF Chris Coghlan (L), OF Bryan Petersen (L), OF Kevin Mattison (L)

Obviously, much depends on Hanley here. In him, Reyes and Stanton, the Marlins may well possess three of the NL’s top 10 position players. Day one went off without a hitch, but it still remains to be seen whether he’ll make an issue of the move to third base. A pouting Ramirez figures to be an unproductive Ramirez, but if Ozzie Guillen can get through to him — and who better to make the attempt — then the lineup could be dynamite.

What is disappointing is that the Marlins didn’t make much of an attempt to upgrade their bench over the winter. But Bonifacio’s versatility does help there. If Reyes or Infante gets hurt (and the Marlins don’t want to move Hanley back to short), Bonifacio can move back to the infield, opening up center for whichever outfielder is playing better. The Marlins do have plenty of competition for those outfield bench spots: one figures to go to a lefty (Cousins, Coghlan or Petersen) and the other to a righty (Rowand or Kearns).

In the Marlins’ case, I’m skeptical that the whole will be the equal to the sum of its parts. There’s some terrific talent here, and it wouldn’t be stunning to see the team win 95+ games and maybe even overtake the Phillies in the NL East. It also wouldn’t be much of a surprise to see Hanley force his way off the team and Johnson spend the bulk of the year on the DL, leading to a fourth-place finish. My guess is that they sneak into the postseason via the wild card, but I’m far from confident.