Matt Harvey

NEW YORK, NY - JULY 30:  Zack Wheeler #45 of the New York Mets in action against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citi Field on July 30, 2014 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. The Mets defeated the Phillies 11-2.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

Report: The Mets have discussed trading Zack Wheeler

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Mets general manager Sandy Alderson told reporters Thursday that he has no plans on trading Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard, or Steven Matz. However, it appears that another one of their young guns is on the table in the right deal.

According to Andy Martino and Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News, the Mets have discussed right-hander Zack Wheeler in trade talks this month. Wheeler, of course, had Tommy John surgery in March and will likely be out until around midseason next year, but he’s just 25 years old and is under team control through 2019.

The Reds (who are known to be shopping Jay Bruce, among others) are one of the teams who inquired on Wheeler, though nothing is going on with them currently and Martino and Ackert are hearing that the Mets “remain unlikely to move him.” It’s unclear how the dynamic has changed after Friday’s deal for Juan Uribe and Kelly Johnson, but the Mets could use another outfielder. Wheeler is an interesting case given that he’s not going to pitch again for a while, but he has the potential to bring back a valuable piece.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

Albert Pujols
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Angels 11, Red Sox 1; Angels 7, Red Sox 3: The Angels pick up their fourth and fifth wins in a row with lots of bombs helping the effort. Kole Calhoun, Albert Pujols and David Freese went long in game 1. In game 2 Pujols struck two more times, one of which pushed him past Mike Schmidt for 15th place all-time with his 549th career homer. He also took over the league lead from teammate Mike Trout who hit a measly one homer in the twin bill. Really, Trout, what’s wrong with you man? The Red Sox scored four runs in the four-game series, all coming in yesterday’s two games.

Nationals 7, Mets 2: The Nats didn’t have much trouble with Matt Harvey, who gave up five runs — four earned — on five hits in seven innings. The Mets left ten men on base and were 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position, which continued the pattern from Sunday’s 18-inning win. I suppose this will become a new hot button issue in the Mets’ press because the press LOVES to talk about teams who have trouble with runners in scoring position. The larger issue, however, is that hitters who aren’t very good don’t hit well with runners in OR out of scoring position.

Rockies 8, Rangers 7: A walkoff single for Rockies’ first baseman Ben Paulsen. In supplying a walkoff RBI single, a member of the Rockies who is otherwise anonymous to all but Colorado fans has a name. His name is Ben Paulsen. His name is Ben Paulsen. HIS NAME IS BEN PAULSEN. HIS NAME IS BEN PAULSEN.

Pirates 10, Royals 7: Travis Ishikawa has stunk on ice since the Pirates picked him up on waivers, but here he hit two doubles and a homer and drove in four runs. After the game he chalked it up to luck, saying that sometimes the pitcher makes a perfect pitch that still gets hit, sometimes the batter knocks the heck out of the ball but it still gets caught. He concluded by saying “tonight was just my night when the balls began to fall.” In other news, “When the Balls Began to Fall” sounds like, say, a second album from some moderately obscure alt-country guy who is a darling in the press but who can’t really connect with a larger audience. Hipsters like to say how much they like him even though “generally, [they] don’t care for country music. Except for Johnny Cash, of course.”

Phillies 5, Rays 3: David Buchanan won the game, allowing three runs on six hits in six and a third and then he was promptly sent down to Lehigh Valley because that’s the life of a fifth starter sometimes. Cesar Hernandez doubled, tripled and drove in two and Maikel Franco had a couple of hits and an RBI for the Phillies who have won four straight.

Tigers 5, Mariners 4: Ian Kinsler homered twice, the second of which was a go-ahead two-run shot in the eighth inning. The Tigers pulled back to .500. Though it may not matter. Come back to HBT later today as I’ll have the first of a three-part series about my recent visits to Detroit and a look at the Tigers as a team in transition.

Braves 7, Dodgers 5: Nick Markakis hit his first of the season. On July 20 which, well, OK. The Braves notched four runs and five hits in four innings off of their old friend Brandon Beachy, who was making his second post-Tommy John surgery start for L.A. Eury Perez threw out Adrian Gonzalez at the plate on a play that still counts as a nice one, even if Adrain Gonzalez is slower than your grandma:

 

Reds 5, Cubs 4: Three homers were hit by Reds batters — Todd Frazier, Jay Bruce and Marlon Byrd — with Frazier’s being his first that was not a part of a home run derby since last month. Not that it was all homers. Because this happened. Which, mercy:

 

Diamondbacks 3, Marlins 1: The Diamondbacks  snapped a six-game losing streak and gave the Marlins their fourth straight loss. So a lot of good stuff going on here. Shortstop Nick Ahmed had ten assists, some of them slicker than grease, and hit a triple as well. David Peralta drove in two.

Padres 4, Giants 2: Matt Kemp hit a two-run homer. Kemp 15-for-39 with 4 HR in his last 10 games. Guess he’s coming back to life, though it’s likely too little, too late.

Chasing Hershiser: Inside the numbers during Zack Greinke’s scoreless streak

Zack Greinke
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Dodgers starter Zack Greinke extended his scoreless innings streak to 43 2/3 innings with eight shutout frames against the Nationals on Sunday. It’s the longest streak since former Dodgers pitcher Orel Hershiser set the major league record with 59 scoreless innings during the 1988 season. Greinke, overall, scattered three hits with a walk and 11 strikeouts. He now has a 9-2 record with a 1.30 ERA, a 0.82 WHIP, and a 117/21 K/BB ratio in 131 1/3 innings.

Hershiser’s streak spanned seven starts between August 30 and September 28. He allowed two runs to the Expos in the fifth inning before finishing out the rest of the season in scoreless fashion. He was in the midst of eight consecutive complete games and would’ve made it nine had the game in which he made his final start of the season not gone 16 innings — he went 10. Greinke’s streak thus far has spanned six starts, beginning in the first inning on June 18 against the Rangers. The pitchers’ respective stat lines during those spans of time:

  • Hershiser: 7 GS, 64 IP (9 1/3 IP per start), 36 H, 2 ER, 11 BB, 43 K
  • Greinke: 6 GS, 43 2/3 IP (7 1/3 IP per start), 19 H, 0 ER, 4 BB, 42 K

ESPN Stats & Info notes that Greinke is only the third pitcher in the modern era (since 1900) to rack up six consecutive scoreless starts in a season. Hershiser and Hideo Nomo are the others. They also point out that opposing hitters have hit to the tune of a .094 batting average against Greinke’s fastball, which is 53 points lower than any other qualified pitcher in that span of time.

According to Baseball Reference, Greinke is also the 14th pitcher since 1914 to rack up at least six starts of at least six innings each while limiting the opposition to four or fewer hits in each outing. It’s an eclectic list:

Name Strk Start End Games Tm
Johan Santana 2004-06-15 2004-08-01 10 MIN
Ted Lilly 2011-09-17 2012-05-07 8 LAD
A.J. Burnett 2007-08-12 2007-09-13 7 TOR
Garrett Richards 2014-06-04 2014-07-01 6 LAA
Matt Harvey 2012-09-19 2013-04-24 6 NYM
Carlos Zambrano 2010-09-04 2010-10-02 6 CHC
Carlos Zambrano 2006-05-16 2006-06-10 6 CHC
Pedro Martinez 2006-04-22 2006-05-20 6 NYM
Sid Fernandez 1989-09-21 1990-04-22 6 NYM
Mark Langston 1988-08-29 1988-09-24 6 SEA
Jim Palmer 1972-05-05 1972-05-28 6 BAL
Nolan Ryan 1971-04-29 1971-05-29 6 NYM
Bob Feller 1946-07-24 1946-08-13 6 CLE
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 7/19/2015.

By the way, it’s going to take some work to overcome Greinke in the NL Cy Young Award race. With Sunday’s outing, Greinke expanded his ERA lead to 79 points over Max Scherzer, 1.30 to 2.09. Four other hurlers are on the periphery: A.J. Burnett (2.11), Jacob deGrom (2.14), Gerrit Cole (2.30), and Shelby Miller (2.33). For Greinke to get his ERA back to 2.00, at his current rate of about seven innings per start, he would need to allow 30 runs over his next 84 innings over 12 starts, which is the equivalent of a 3.21 ERA.