Tag: Matt Garza

Matt Garza

The Brewers will shut Matt Garza down for the rest of the season


Matt Garza made what turned out to be his final start of the 2015 season on Saturday afternoon in the first game of a doubleheader against the Reds. The right-hander allowed five runs (four earned) on seven hits and four walks with two strikeouts in 4 2/3 innings.

Following the outing, the Brewers decided to shut Garza down for the rest of the season. Manager Craig Counsell said he wants to look at other options, Todd Rosiak of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports.

Garza, 31, ends a disappointing season with a 5.63 ERA, a 1.57 WHIP, and a 104/57 K/BB ratio over 148 2/3 innings. The veteran is halfway through a four-year, $50 million contract signed with the Brewers in January 2014. He’ll earn $12.5 million over each of the next two seasons.

And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

Ian Kinsler

Tigers 8, Royals 6: Victor Martinez homered twice and drove in five runs, but it was Ian Kinsler’s two-run walkoff homer which ended this one. The Tigers took two of three from division-leading Kansas City and now sit three and a half out in the wild card. It’s highly unlikely they’ll leap over all of the teams ahead of them but, if they manage it, do they get backsies on David Price, or what?

Brewers 10, Padres 1: Khris Davis hit two three-run homers and Matt Garza had no trouble with the Padres lineup, allowing only two hits in seven innings. Davis’ homers came off of Odrisamer Despaigne and Kevin Quackenbush. We should maybe check with the Elias Sports Bureau first, but I’m gonna wager that no batter in MLB history has ever hit two homers in a game off of pitchers with more combined letters in their names than Davis did here.

Astros 5, Athletics 4: Jed Lowrie had a throwing error in the ninth that allowed Oakland to score twice and force extra innings. But then he hit an RBI double off Edward Mujica with two outs in the 10th. Counter Intelligence is going over the video of this to see if the error was truly a mistake and if the double wasn’t just a means of making Houston brass believe he is not an A’s agent planted deep within the Astros organization. Really, when it comes Lowrie, the Astros and the Athletics, it’s hard to know where allegiances truly lie.

Dodgers 10, Phillies 8: You figure if you score six runs on seven hits in six innings off of Zack Greinke — five of which come in the first inning before he retires any of you — that you’re living right. But then your starter gives up seven runs in four innings, including a homer and two other hits to Greinke himself and, nah, you ain’t. Not a pretty game here at all. The six runs Greinke gave up in the first three innings here match the number of runs he gave up in his previous nine starts combined. But hey, a win.

Cardinals 3, Reds 0: Michael Wacha and three relievers combine to shut out the Reds. St. Louis held Cincy scoreless for the last 18 innings of this series. Reds starter Michael Lorenzen is 0-5 in his last seven starts.

Nationals 8, Diamondbacks 3: Rookie Joe Ross allowed a run and five hits while striking out seven in six innings and then, after the game, learned that the guy he was replacing in the rotation, Doug Fister, was being demoted to the bullpen. Bryce Harper reached base all three times he came to the plate and scored twice. His line on the year: .334/.461/.666. Hail Satan.

Braves 9, Marlins 8: Andrew McKirahan got his first career win and Arodys Vizcaino got his first career save. Both of them served 80-game suspensions for PEDs this year. Hail Hydra.

Yankees 2, Red Sox 1: The second 2-1 game between these two. If it wasn’t for that ugly 13-3 thing on Tuesday this series would probably challenge for the lowest-scoring Yankees-Red Sox series in recent history. As it was, CC Sabathia actually pitched well, allowing one run in six innings, A-Rod doubled in a run and Jacoby Ellsbury homered to put the Yankees ahead for good. Now New York faces a big series against the Jays this weekend.

Blue Jays 9, Twins 3: Mark Buehrle won — it was his 30th win against Minnesota in his career — and Edwin Encarnacion went 3-for-4 with four RBIs and scored twice. Also hit his 250th career homer. The Jays complete a four-game sweep of Minnesota, knocking the fading Twins back to .500 and putting them behind both the Rangers and the Orioles for the second wild card slot. Seems like the Cinderella phase of Minnesota’s season is over. Three games in the Bronx for Toronto now.

Cubs 5, Giants 4: The Cubs win their seventh of eight thanks to a Kyle Schwarber three- run homer and a Jorge Soler bases-loaded single. Jason Hammel was kinda miffed after the game that Joe Maddon pulled him in the fifth inning when he was in trouble, but they said afterward they’re on the same page. I’m assuming Maddon and him “rapped it out,” as the cool kids said and then were all copacetic. Joe Maddon is hip and knows how to talk to today’s youth.

Reminder: even though the trade deadline has passed, trades can still happen

James Shields

I write some variation on this post every year, mostly because there is always someone who asks why guys are still being talked about in trade rumors even though the “trade deadline” was July 31. So, let’s do this again, shall we?

July 31 is the non-waiver trade deadline. That means that clubs can just straight up trade dudes. Between now and August 31 clubs can trade dudes, but to do so they have to send them through waivers first. It works like this:

  • A team wishing to trade a player as of now will place him on revocable waivers. That means that the team can pull the player back off waivers if the player is claimed by another teams;
  • If the player is placed on waivers and goes unclaimed by every other team (i.e.  he “clears waivers”) he can be traded the same as he could have been before the July 31 deadline. He’d be eligible for the playoff roster and everything, as long as it was before the end of August;
  • If a player placed on waivers is claimed by another team, the team doing the waiving has a choice: they can pull him back (which is the “revocable” part of “revocable waivers”), keeping him as if nothing happened OR they can let the claiming team have him. If they do that, the claiming team is stuck with the player, including his current salary;
  • There is an order to the claiming process — teams with the worst record in the same league get to claim guys placed on waivers first, and then the choice cycles through the teams in the other league, worst record to best as well.

You often hear about big names with big salaries placed on waivers. They’re rarely claimed, however, because as noted above, the claiming team would be stuck with the salary. So, for example, the Phillies may place Ryan Howard on waivers. There is a low possibility anyone will claim him, of course, because even if a team wants Ryan Howard, they really don’t want that contract. This is why it’s not really news when someone reports that “so and so was placed on waivers.” People still act like it’s news for some reason, but it isn’t. People get bored easily.

Likewise, a team claiming someone isn’t really big news because teams often play games with the waiver process. For example, sometimes a team will claim a guy for the express purpose of NOT allowing him to clear waivers and thus be traded to a rival. For example, if a club puts a guy on waivers that the Astros REALLY want, the Angels — who have a worse record than the Astros and thus claiming priority — may put a claim on him to keep him from clearing and thus being traded to the Astros. There’s risk involved to the Angels of course in that the team placing the guy on waivers may not pull him back, thus sticking him with the Angels, but that’s the gamble involved.

So that’s what waiver trades are all about. Some waiver trades will happen. If they do, they will either involve (a) guys with not-so-great contracts, particularly starting pitchers; (b) guys coming back from an injury who represent something of a gamble; or (c) role players, bench bats and the like. Jerry Crasnick of ESPN has a post up today about some possible waiver trade candidates. I’d add a couple more to that list he leaves out — Howard, James Shields, and Matt Garza come to mind.

Anyway, if you take nothing else from this, take this one thing: generally ignore reports about guys being placed on waivers. Almost everyone is placed on waivers. It doesn’t matter, however, unless they clear.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Kyle Schwarber

Cubs 5, Reds 4: Rookie Kyle Schwarber hit a two-run homer to tie it in the ninth inning and send it to extras and then, in the thirteenth, hit a solo homer to put the Cubs ahead for good. He’s also from Middletown Ohio, just up the road from Great American Ballpark, so this homecoming was really damn sweet. Or at least the second homecoming. A little over a week ago he was the MVP of the Future’s Game in the same park. The future is now for him, however. In his two stints in the bigs this season Schwarber is 16 for his first 39 with three homers, two doubles, a triple and ten driven in.

Mariners 11, Tigers 9: This was . . . bad. After the Tigers battled back from a 5-1 deficit and led 8-6, Neftali Feliz came into the game in the eighth inning and loaded the bases, threw a wild pitch and then, after loading the bases again on an intentional walk, gave up a pinch hit grand slam to Franklin Gutierrez. Worse: as Feliz was busy imploding, there was no one warming in the Tigers bullpen. After the game, Brad Ausmus was asked about it and said he had two guys left: Joakim Soria and Alex Wilson. He said he was saving Soria for the ninth — apparently the idea of him getting a four-out save or even coming in to put out a fire when the game was on the line was anathema to Ausmus — and he didn’t bring in Alex Wilson because, according to Ausmus, he was the only guy left who could go multiple innings and he was being saved for extras.

How one is such a slave to the three-out closer and how one saves another pitcher for extra innings when the game is being lost right in front of his damn eyes in the eighth is an utter mystery to me. As Leo Durocher once said, “you don’t save a pitcher for tomorrow. Tomorrow it may rain.” The “tomorrow” part of that applies to extra innings too, and “rain” can be considered metaphorical here.

Yankees 3, Orioles 2: Brendan Ryan hasn’t done a heck of a lot this year but he hit a tiebreaking RBI double in the sixth inning of this one. A-Rod had a sac fly and Chase Headley had an RBI double as well as the Yankees put another game between themselves and one of their division rivals.

Mets 7, Nationals 2: The Mets’ lineup finally came through, with pinch hitter Eric Campbell coming through with a big hit with runners on in the seventh and then the rest of the offense pouring it on late with four runs in the ninth. Jacob deGrom struck out eight and picked up his tenth win. He only threw 82 pitches n six innings and probably could’ve gone eight innings or the distance even, but Collins use of Campbell in that key moment of the game is the sort of thing one has to do when the offense has been struggling so much. Worked out nicely.

Rays 1, Phillies 0: Aaron Nola made his MLB debut and it was a nice one, allowing only one run on five hits over six innings, striking out six. Unfortunately for him he got no run support at all as Nathan Karns and five Rays relievers combined to shut out the Phillies. The only run in the game: Karns hitting a homer off of Nola. He is the first AL pitcher to homer in a game in four years.


Braves 4, Dodgers 3: AP wire story headline:


I guess you’re scrappy if you have almost no stuff — only 59 of Alex Wood’s 107 were strikes — and still win anyway. In Johnson’s case you’re scrappy if you spend the last few days demanding to be traded and then drive in a couple on a groundout and a single. Nominate them for the Heart and Hustle Award, I guess.

Cardinals 8, White Sox 5: Matt Holliday’s first homer since early May was a fourth inning grand slam that put the Cardinals up 7-0 and effectively ended the competitive portion of this game. Holliday singled and scored a run too. Prospect Stephen Piscotty made his major league debut for St. Louis as well and had an infield single and struck out twice.

Royals 3, Pirates 1: Jarrod Dyson hit a two-run single in the eighth inning and then came around to score on an Alcides Escobar single. The Pirates threatened in both the eighth and ninth, giving some scares to the usually dominant Wade Davis and Greg Holland, but each shook their way out of jams. This could be a World Series preview. Which would’ve been an insane thing to say just a couple of years ago.

Brewers 8, Indians 1:Matt Garza pitched six shutout innings in his return from the disabled list and Jean Segura — Jean Segura?! — hit a two-run homer. The Indians hit into three double plays.

Astros 8, Red Sox 3: Chris Carter was in an 0-for-20 slump before a single and then later hit a two-run homer. Carlos Correa drove in two. The Red Sox blew a 3-0 lead and have lost six straight.

Rangers 9, Rockies 0: Shin-Soo Choo hit for the cycle in this one, finished off with a leadoff triple in the ninth inning. He doubled in the second inning, homered in the fourth and singled in the fifth and finished with three RBI. Delino DeShields has four hits and fell a homer short of the cycle. Two in one game would’ve been trippy.

Marlins 3, Diamondbacks 0: Mat Latos could be traded before the deadline. If so, he just made himself look more attractive, tossing seven shutout innings and striking out seven. After the game he said “Right now I wear a Marlins uniform so I have to take care of business as a Marlin.” Our condolences to Latos and his family in this obviously difficult time.

Angels 7, Twins 0: Matt Shoemaker could lose his starting rotation gig when Jered Weaver returns from the disabled list. He’s trying to make that decision more difficult for Mike Scioscia, though, by doing things like striking out ten Twins in six shutout innings and allowing only two hits. Meanwhile, Chris Ianetta homered and drove in four on the night.

Blue Jays 7, Athletics 1: Russell Martin, Jose Bautista and Edwin Encarnacion each homered. Martin’s was a three-run shot. Mark Buehrle won his 11th, allowing one run and eight hits in seven innings. The game was a Buehrle Special too, lasting only two hours and thirty-eight minutes.

Giants 9, Padres 3: Chris Heston had a no-hitter going into the sixth inning and ended up allowing only that hit while pitching seven and a third. Hunter Pence, Brandon Crawford and Hector Sanchez all homered. Sanchez’s was a grand slam.

Big night for slugging catchers, no?

Trade candidate Matt Garza returns to the Brewers’ rotation

Matt Garza

Right-hander Matt Garza is off the disabled list and back in the Brewers’ rotation after missing the past two weeks with shoulder tendinitis.

Garza missed the minimum 15 days, which is noteworthy because the Brewers would clearly love to trade him before July 31 if possible and this gives him a chance to make two starts prior to the deadline.

Of course, it may be a moot point. Garza had a 5.55 ERA in 17 starts before going on the disabled list, was good but not great in 27 starts last season, and is owed $12 million in both 2016 and 2017. No matter how he looks in the past 10 days, Milwaukee would almost surely have to eat a big chunk of that remaining money to move Garza for anything resembling a prospect.