Tag: Mark Trumbo


And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Dodgers 11, Marlins 1: Andre Ethier went 5-for-5 with a homer and three RBI in this laugher. Although the Marlins had the highlight of the night. Hold on to you butts, my friends, and watch this drive:


Giants 8, Astros 1: Chris Heston tossed a two-hit complete game while striking out ten. Seeing a complete game from anyone who isn’t a thirtysomething frontline starter these days is sort of like seeing a double rainbow or the Shamrock Shake back at McDonalds or something.

White Sox 4, Brewers 2: Chris Sale had been suspended and thus had five days of rest instead of the usual four between starts. The extra day must’ve done him wonders as he struck out 11 brewers in eight innings of three-hit ball. In other news, “five-day” suspensions cause starting pitchers to, in reality, only be pushed back a day. May as well just do fines for starters instead of suspensions. The extra rest actually helped the guy here.

Royals 7, Rangers 6: The Royals took the lead in the ninth and handed it over to Greg Holland, who blew the save. Alex Gordon hit a homer in the 10th to give them the lead once again and it was once again handed over to Greg Holland and this time he locked it down. Well, got the win anyway, not the save. You can’t really blow the save then get the save. Statistics don’t work like that.

Cubs 6, Mets 1: Noah Syndergaard made his big league debut and it was not one he’s going to count among the best in his career, I don’t think. He started strong, matching zeroes with Jake Arrieta until the sixth inning when the Cubs hung four on him. Oh well, welcome to the big leagues, kid. Kris Bryant went 3-for-4 with a homer and a triple. The homer was a long one, but the triple was maybe more impressive, going the opposite way, farther than it should’ve given the swing he put on it. Guy just has crazy power:


Rays 4, Yankees 2: Chris Archer looked like he was going to get pummeled early, but managed to only give up two runs in a first inning when the first five men he faced reached base. Then the Rays rallied for two in the seventh and two in the eighth. Attendance was 10,417. Not even the Yankees can draw in Tampa Bay anymore.

Reds 4, Braves 3: Yesterday, when I tweeted about how I was heading down to Cincinnati to cover this game, someone on Twitter told me that I should ask Bryan Price why Devin Mesoraco  — who has been limited to pinch-hitting duties due to hip problems, thus leaving the Reds with, in effect, a 24-man roster — hasn’t been placed on the disabled list yet. It’s still a good question, but last night it was good for the Reds that he was around, given his pinch-hit walkoff double. The reason that was the winning run and not merely the tying run was because Braves starter Mike Foltynewicz threw away a ball while trying to get the lead runner on a sac bunt in the seventh rather than take the dang out the Reds were trying to give him. The lead runner scored the tying run. In other news, it’s harder than you think to not yell down at the field at the top of your lungs from the press box when the team you root for does something boneheaded.

Tigers 2, Twins 1: A walkoff bloop single for Ian Kinsler in the tenth, set up by an Anthony Gose double. Before that Alfredo Simon and Kyle Gibson dueled.

Pirates 7, Phillies 2: Four straight wins for the Pirates who you knew dang well weren’t going to scuffle along all year. And you knew Andrew McCutchen was going to right the ship too. Here he singled and hit a two-run homer to back A.J. Burnett, who allowed only one earned run in seven innings.

Blue Jays 10, Orioles 2: Edwin Encarnacion hit two homers. This is where I’d insert that “Nacho Libre” clip, but someone went and took it off of YouTube. Oh, there are a lot of them there still, but not the one that’s just ten seconds long with no pre-roll ad. Really, YouTube ads have killed the short video clip as insert comedy. This makes me way sadder than it should, because that was some comedy right there. Not as much comedy as the Orioles’ defense last night, but some good belly laughs.

Cardinals 8, Indians 3: A two-out three-run homer by Matt Holliday was just one of the many, many two-out RBI hits for the Cardinals. Indeed, all of their runs came on two-out hits. Indians pitchers: 66% is a failing grade no matter where you are. Lance Lynn shut the Tribe out for six innings, striking out 9.

Mariners 11, Padres 4: There was a time, not too long ago, when an M’s-Pads might not score 15 runs between them in a three game series. Here the ball flew out of Safeco, with Mike Zunino hitting two homers, Nelson Cruz hitting his league-leading 15th and the Mariners smacking six in all.

Athletics 9, Red Sox 2: Lots of blowouts out west last night, eh? The A’s snap their six-game losing streak thanks in part to Josh Reddick, who had four hits with a homer and three RBI. Eric Sogard drove in three himself, as Boston’s starting pitching continues to be a horror show.

Angels 5, Rockies 2: The Angels rallied for three in the eighth, thanks in part to Albert Pujols straight-up stealing second base and then coming around to score on a single. He reached base by snapping an 0-for-13 skid. But I’m sure no one was worried about that because, obviously, Pujols is all about his wheels and speed don’t slump. The Rockies have lost ten in a row. Which is some seriously special stuff.

Diamondbacks 14, Nationals 6: Two homers for Mark Trumbo, who drove in four. The Nationals had never given up 14 runs before. Not since they were the Expos, at least. Even if they and their fans like to pretend they were never the Expos.

Diamondbacks still aren’t sure what to do with $68.5 million signing Yasmany Tomas

Yasmany Tomas

First the Diamondbacks insisted Yasmany Tomas could play third base, then they moved him to the outfield, and now they’ve sent him to Triple-A. So what position will the $68.5 million pickup from Cuba play in the minors?

Steve Gilbert of MLB.com reports that Tomas will play third base, outfield, and possibly even some first base. Or as general manager Dave Stewart put it:

What we’re trying to do is figure out a way to create at-bats for him, which is primarily the reason he didn’t stay. If we had more at-bats and could get him more playing time, he’d be here.

First base in Arizona is occupied by Paul Goldschmidt and prospect Jake Lamb is a better long-term bet at third base. Mark Trumbo started in right field for the Diamondbacks on Opening Day. He’s a 29-year-old with a career .247 batting average and .298 on-base percentage. He also has a .460 slugging percentage thanks to 30-homer power, but the combination of his awful OBP skills, age, and poor defense make Trumbo someone who really shouldn’t be blocking Tomas on a rebuilding team.

Whenever he does get called up to Arizona for good, it seems likely that Tomas will be replacing Trumbo.

2015 Preview: Arizona Diamondbacks

Chip Hale, Dave Stewart, Tony LaRussa

Between now and Opening Day, HardballTalk will take a look at each of baseball’s 30 teams, asking the key questions, the not-so-key questions, and generally breaking down their chances for the 2015 season. Next up. The Arizona Diamondbacks.

The Big Question: There’s nowhere to go but up, right?

Since winning the National League West in 2011, the Diamondbacks have turned in three straight disappointing seasons and finished last season with the worst record in the majors at 64-98. Tony La Russa was hired as chief baseball officer early on in the year, which essentially signaled that Kevin Towers and Kirk Gibson were living on borrowed time. Sure enough, they were both fired in September.

Tasked with taking the franchise in a new direction, La Russa hired one of his former pitchers from the Athletics, Dave Stewart, to serve as general manager while De Jon Watson was brought over from the Dodgers as senior vice president of baseball operations. Chip Hale, who has coached with the Mets and Athletics in recent seasons, was then brought aboard for his first managing opportunity in the big leagues.

Stewart was outspoken when he was an agent and he has already said his fair share of interesting things as Arizona’s general manager. Most notably, when the Diamondbacks were briefly courting right-hander James Shields in free agency, he said they were more of a “true baseball team” as opposed to teams which are more geared toward analytics. This was likely just an attempt at a sales pitch to appeal to a player they only had a small chance of actually signing, but it’s not the first impression you want after the grit-centered philosophy of Towers and Gibson fizzled out.

Getting back to contender status is going to be a process. The team’s big offseason move was signing Yasmany Tomas to a six-year, $68.5 million contract, but the third base experiment has been a bust so far and he’s still learning to hit major league pitching. Interesting arms like Jeremy Hellickson, Rubby De La Rosa, Allen Webster, Robbie Ray, and Yoan Lopez were brought in over the offseason, but this is a team that is going with Josh Collmenter as their Opening Day starter. He would be a back-end starter on a good staff. After dealing catcher Miguel Montero to the Cubs, Stewart didn’t seem so keen (or didn’t have the budget) to acquire a suitable replacement, so Tuffy Gosewisch stands to get most of the playing time in the early going. Peter O’Brien, who Stewart was hoping could be a solution behind the plate, was having trouble throwing the ball back to the mound this spring and could be bound for the outfield. Barring a last-minute move, this could be the weakest catching situation in the majors.

This lineup has a couple of interesting pieces in place, which I’ll get to in a minute, but expectations are understandably low for 2015 in a division which also has the Dodgers, Giants, and Padres.

What else is going on?

  • After finishing second in the NL MVP balloting in 2013, Paul Goldschmidt was well on his way to a comparable follow-up last season by hitting .300/.396/.542 with 19 home runs and 69 RBI across 109 games before he suffered a broken hand on a hit-by-pitch in early August. He’s back to 100 percent now and remains the shining light on this roster.
  • Aside from the excellence of Goldschmidt at first base, the infield is in flux. Assuming Tomas doesn’t work out at third base, young Jake Lamb is a possibility there, but Aaron Hill could also get some time at the hot corner if the D-Backs go with Nick Ahmed at shortstop and try Chris Owings at second base. Trading Hill, which has been rumored, could clear the way for all of the youngsters to get playing time. I’m guessing we’ll see that configuration sooner or later.
  • This outfield has a lot of moving pieces and not all of them are ideal fits. A.J. Pollock is locked in as the starting center fielder while Mark Trumbo appears set to start in right field, but David Peralta, Ender Inciarte, Cody Ross, and Tomas are also in the mix. Trumbo and Tomas in the corners might not be pretty. They also have similar offensive profiles. Which is to say, power without much patience.
  • This rotation doesn’t look particularly strong right now, but it figures to get better as the season moves along. Patrick Corbin and Bronson Arroyo are both working their way back from Tommy John surgery and should be ready to return by mid-season. Things didn’t go as planned for top prospect Archie Bradley last year, but he could surface in the majors soon with a good showing in Triple-A.
  • Perhaps my favorite story to watch with this team will be Daniel Hudson, who has lost much of the last three seasons due to a pair of Tommy John surgeries. The 28-year-old returned for three relief appearances down the stretch last year and has flashed mid-90s velocity this spring. It’s unclear if he’ll be used as a starter or reliever, but here’s hoping he can finally stay healthy and deliver on the promise he showed in the early part of his career.

Prediction: This could really go either way with the Rockies, as they look like two of the weakest teams in the majors, but I’m going to say a repeat of Fifth Place, NL West.

The Dbacks and the Dodgers were at it again yesterday

Screen Shot 2015-03-24 at 8.37.04 AM

The Dodgers and the Dbacks played yesterday. They’ve had a bit of a feud going for a couple of years. One would think that with a new GM and new manager in Arizona — the old management was pretty pro-hitting guys — that it would die down a bit, but I guess not. Or maybe it was all accidental. It’s pretty hard to say. All I do know is that lots of guys were plunked and lots of guys were ejected in their matchup yesterday afternoon at Camelback Ranch.

In the first inning Dodgers starter Chris Anderson hit Mark Trumbo on a high and inside pitch. After the game Don Mattingly said it wasn’t intentional. I’ve seen Gifs of it (look here) but there’s no video on MLB.com. Seems maybe purposeful, but it’s hard to tell what people are doing in spring training. Maybe he’s just working on brushing guys back. Maybe he was possessed by the spirit of Don Drysdale.

Then, in the bottom half of the first, Daniel Hudson hit Justin Turner.  Turner was then plunked again in the fifth inning by Allen Webster. Here’s the second one:

The dumb thing there? Webster and manager Chip Hale were ejected because, after the stuff in the first inning, both benches had been warned. This despite the fact that the home plate umpire knew that the second plunk was not intentional:

Viva la Zero Tolerance.

Things didn’t stop there, as Dbacks pitcher Derek Eitel plunked Dodgers hitter Dillon Moyer in the bottom of the eighth. That led to more ejections, this time of Eitel and D-Backs bench coach Glenn Sherlock who had replaced Hale:

Was that intentional? Kinda looked like it? But who knows. We’re dealing with anonymous dudes at this point. Which could either mean (a) their control isn’t fabulous; or (b) they’re trying to impress someone.

It’ll be interesting to see if this is a harbinger of a continuation of bad blood between the clubs or if it’s just a spring training blip. I’d bet on the blip, but then again, I never would’ve bet on all of the nonsense between these two teams over the past couple of years in the first place.

Diamondbacks have no intention to trade Mark Trumbo

Mark Trumbo

The Diamondbacks have a surfeit of capable outfielders, heading into the season with A.J. Pollock in center, Mark Trumbo in right, and David Peralta or Yasmany Tomas in left. Ender Inciarte, having a terrific spring, is capable of playing all three positions and they have Cody Ross as well.

One way to fix the logjam would be to trade Trumbo. But GM Dave Stewart said, “We are not moving Trumbo,” as Jon Heyman of CBS Sports reports. Stewart added, “Trumbo is a proven bat. Tough to move him for an unknown.”

Trumbo, 29, is earning $6.9 million after avoiding arbitration in his second year of eligibility. He can become a free agent after the 2016 season. The slugger missed a large portion of the 2014 season due to a stress fracture in his right foot and finished with only 14 home runs and 61 RBI with a .235 average.

Trumbo would seem the easiest to move, as Ross is older, more expensive, and missed time in each of the last two seasons with injuries. Tomas isn’t going anywhere, while Pollock, Peralta and Inciarte have more value to the Diamondbacks than they would in a trade.