Tag: Mario Hollands

Andy Oliver

Ruben Amaro on Andy Oliver’s decision to elect free agency: “I think it was a very foolish move on his part, but that’s OK.”


The Phillies made a pair of selections in this past winter’s Rule 5 draft. They took second baseman Odubel Herrera from the Rangers and converted him to a center fielder, and they took left-handed pitcher Andy Oliver from the Pirates. Oliver was competing for a spot in the Phillies’ bullpen and impressed early, but faltered late. Ultimately, he finished with a 3.55 ERA with a 22/11 K/BB ratio in 12 2/3 Grapefruit League innings.

Oliver was put on waivers, the first step in an attempt by the Phillies to fully acquire his rights from the Pirates. If he had passed through, the Phillies could have worked out a trade. Otherwise, Rule 5 picks must stay on the team’s 25-man roster for the duration of the season. After Oliver cleared waivers, the Phillies outrighted Oliver to Triple-A Lehigh Valley, but he chose instead to elect free agency.

Phillies GM Ruben Amaro still seems a bit salty about Oliver’s decision to leave. Via MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki:

“We offered him a pretty good deal to come back,” Amaro said. “He just decided to go somewhere else. I think it was a very foolish move on his part, but that’s OK. He had a choice. He had that right.”

The Phillies recently designated southpaw Cesar Jimenez for assignment to make room for Sean O’Sullivan. Jimenez is now with Lehigh Valley, but won’t be eligible for a promotion for another week. With Mario Hollands injured and Elvis Araujo in the minors, Jake Diekman is currently the only left-handed pitcher in the Phillies’ bullpen.

The Rays signed Oliver to a minor league contract earlier this week, Roger Mooney of the Tampa Tribune reported. Oliver was a former top starting pitching prospect in the Tigers’ system but was converted to a reliever last season with the Pirates at Triple-A Indianapolis.

Mario Hollands undergoes Tommy John surgery

mario hollands getty

According to Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com, Phillies left-hander Mario Hollands underwent Tommy John reconstructive elbow surgery on Wednesday. The procedure was called a success, as most athletic procedures are in the hours after they’re completed.

Hollands is going to miss the entire 2015 season and the first month or two of the 2016 campaign as well.

The 26-year-old southpaw posted a 4.40 ERA, 1.40 WHIP, and 35/21 K/BB ratio in 47 innings of relief last season as a rookie. Holland began experiencing elbow problems toward the end of spring training this year in Florida.

Mario Hollands is done for the season with a flexor strain

Mario Hollands Phillies
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Philadelphia placed left-handed reliever Mario Hollands on the 60-day disabled list with a strained flexor tendon, which he suffered Wednesday.

That means Hollands is done for the season and it’s not known yet if he’ll eventually require surgery, putting the 26-year-old’s future in question.

He appeared in 50 games for the Phillies as a rookie, posting a 4.40 ERA and 35/21 K/BB ratio in 47 innings.

Kyle Kendrick apologizes for showing up Ryne Sandberg

Kyle Kendrick

Phillies pitcher Kyle Kendrick was throwing well through five innings in Saturday’s start against the Giants, holding them to one run. He entered the sixth with a 5-1 lead, but all hell broke loose. Buster Posey led off with a single, then Pablo Sandoval hit a mile-high pop-up to the right side of the infield. Both second baseman Chase Utley and first baseman Ryan Howard came after it, but the ball dropped between them. Utley picked up the ball and quickly made a back-hand flip to second base in attempt to secure the force out, but it was wide and dragged shortstop Jimmy Rollins off of the bag, allowing both runners to reach safely. Mike Morse followed up with an RBI double to make it 5-2 and put runners on second and third.

Manager Ryne Sandberg came out to the mound to get Kendrick. As is customary, the pitcher waits on the mound before handing off the ball to his manager, but a frustrated Kendrick was already on his way off the field before Sandberg could reach the mound. Lefty reliever Mario Hollands came in, but the Giants kept scoring, and the Phillies ultimately lost 6-5.

Kendrick apologized for showing up his manager and explained his frustration afterwards. Via CSN Philly’s Jim Salisbury:

“We talked,” Kendrick said before Sunday afternoon’s game. “I know it wasn’t the right thing to do.”


“Obviously you want the ball caught, but I was just upset at coming out of the game,” he said. “The ball falling in had nothing to do with it. I didn’t handle it right.”


“He wanted to see where I was at,” Kendrick said. “I didn’t want to come out of the game. I wasn’t trying to show up Ryno. That wasn’t my intention. I was upset and I wanted to get where no one could see me as quick as possible.

“Everything’s been kind of building up. It’s been a tough year for us and me personally. You’ve got to keep fighting, but little stuff irritates you.”

Following Saturday’s start, Kendrick has a 5-11 record with a 4.90 ERA and a 91/44 K/BB ratio in 154 1/3 innings over 25 starts. He can become a free agent after the season. Given the Phillies’ status as non-contenders for the foreseeable future, it seems unlikely that the team would bring him back in 2015. As a result, Kendrick is essentially auditioning for prospective teams over the remaining month and a half of the season.

It’s July and the Phillies will listen to anything

Cliff Lee

Hello, July.

Hello, trading season.

The Phillies spent the last day of June recovering from an embarrassing 2-6 homestand that knocked them out of the NL East race for good. There was a smidgeon of hope for this team after it put together a 5-2 road trip earlier last month, but splitting a four-game series with the Marlins and being swept by the Braves at home has put an end to all the little far-fetched fantasies surrounding this losing team.

The Phils needed a good homestand to keep their hopes alive. They came up small. Time to move on.

The Phillies are back on the road Tuesday night to begin a 10-game trip that will take them to Miami, Pittsburgh and Milwaukee before coming home for three games before the All-Star break against Washington.

The sweep at the hands of Atlanta left the Phillies eight games back in the NL East and on pace for 91 losses. Even a good road trip won’t turn this thing around. We won’t be fooled again. This team is just not good enough.

So what’s left for this club?

The coming months will be spent evaluating and giving experience to youngsters such as third baseman Cody Asche and relievers Jake Diekman, Mario Hollands, Ken Giles and Justin De Fratus.

As for the rest of the crew. Well, make an offer. Just about anyone can be had in a trade — for the right price — as the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline approaches and a much-needed franchise re-tooling comes to the fore. The Phillies need this and they are headed in that direction. No, it won’t be a Sixers-like strip-down — Phillies management is loath to use the word “rebuilding” — but changes are coming.

Cole Hamels is the closest thing the Phillies have to an untouchable. They would prefer to build around the 30-year-old lefty. But blow them away, and yes, they will consider it.

You can believe all the word salad coming from Phillies management about not wanting to deal the club icons that helped them win the 2008 World Series, but why would anyone admit that changes are coming a month before the deadline? What good would it do to publicly shudder the season a month before you have to? It would hurt ticket sales. Better to focus on winning as many games as possible now and make moves right before the deadline.

If Chase Utley comes to management and says he’d like to move on, maybe be a San Francisco Giant, Phillies elders will try to make to it happen (for the right return). If Utley remains hush, he will stay with the Phillies. He drove the bus last summer when he told club officials not to entertain trade requests and focus on a contract extension. He still drives it.

If the Phillies get an offer they like on Jimmy Rollins, they will go to him and ask what he wants to do. Stay or go? Ultimately it will be Rollins’ call.

Both Rollins and Utley have full veto power over trades.

Ryan Howard? Untradeable because of his contract.

Cliff Lee? If he proves healthy in the three starts he’s expected to make before July 31, the Phils would move him for the right return. Otherwise, they will hang on to him and make him available in the offseason.

Mike Adams? There would have been interest had he not come down with a sore shoulder. It’s tough to see him getting moved before the deadline, but he could be an August waiver deal.

A.J. Burnett pitches Tuesday night in Miami. He has put together four good ones in a row. He is a candidate to move before the deadline.

So is Kyle Kendrick. Yeah, he’s just a No. 5 starter, but sometimes a marginal pickup can make a difference on a contending team. Kendrick could be appealing to a contender.

Jonathan Papelbon could be a fit in a number of towns, especially if the Phillies would pick up part of his $13 million salary for next season. The Phils were willing to do that over the winter. Papelbon, however, might not be the most attractive reliever that the Phillies put on the market. Antonio Bastardo, left-handed and having a solid season, could be the first reliever to go. In fact, he might be the first Phillie to go.

Looking for an outfielder? The Phils would move four of them — Marlon Byrd, Domonic Brown, Ben Revere and John Mayberry Jr.

July is here. It’s baseball’s trading season. The Phillies might not be ready to admit it — why wave the white flag publicly when there is a month to go before the deadline? — but they are open for business. It won’t be easy making trades, not with the money some of these guys are owed beyond this season, but deals are coming. This season is beyond hope (and the Phillies have no one to blame but themselves for that after that awful homestand.)

It’s time to retool.