Tag: Luis Mendoza

Kansas City's Mendoza delivers a pitch against Milwaukee in their MLB baseball game in Kansas City

Luis Mendoza is headed to Japan

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Kansas City has released veteran right-hander Luis Mendoza so that he can sign with a team in Japan.

Mendoza threw 260 innings for the Royals during the past two seasons, making 40 starts and a dozen relief appearances, but at age 30 he has a 5.39 career ERA and similarly ugly secondary numbers.

He’s expected to join the Nippon Ham Fighters in the NPB.

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

St. Louis Cardinals v Cincinnati Reds

Cardinals 11, Reds 4: I’ll take “Improbable scores for an extra-inning game for $200, Alex.” It was already 7-4 in the top of the 10th when Matt Holliday came to the plate but he hit a grand slam off Curtis Partch to truly ice the game. J.J. Hoover was charged with six of the seven runs scored by St. Louis that inning. I wonder if anyone in Cincinnati can think of clever and/or crude ways to describe Hoover’s performance in this one that incorporate his name somehow.

Rangers 6, Blue Jays 4: The Rangers avoid a sweep and move back into first place by a half game. Homers from Adrian Beltre, Nelson Cruz and David Murphy.

Tigers 4, Indians 1: Jose Alvarez makes his MLB debut in a spot start, allows one run in six innings, gets the W and is sent back down. Such is life when you play for a veteran-laden, first place team. Don Kelly hit a three-run homer to break the 1-1 tie in the sixth.

Marlins 8, Mets 4: The Marlins have 18 wins. Eight of them have come against the Mets. The Mets made news after this one by sending down a few players and calling up a few in their place. Thing is, there are still a bunch of minor leaguers in talent and essence on this club.

Nationals 7, Twins 0; Nationals 5, Twins 4: Jordan Zimmermann tossed seven two-hit shutout innings in game one while Anthony Rendon doubled in two and singled in ones. In the nightcap it was the bullpen that did the heavy lifting as Nathan Karns didn’t have much but the pen held the Twins scoreless for the final six innings.

Red Sox 10, Angels 5: Jarrod Saltalamacchia hit two homers. David Ortiz hit a three-run job. The Sox took two of three, have won six of eight overall and are sitting on top of the AL East by a game and a half.

Brewers 9, Phillies 1: Kyle Lohse was strong and got his first win in eight starts and the Brewers take three of four. But Ryan Braun came out of the game as his thumb continues to bother him, and he’s probably gonna hit the DL soon.

Orioles 10, Rays 7:  Baltimore: unimpressed by Matt Moore. The racked up nine runs on 12 hits off him, with J.J. Hardy, Adam Jones, Alexi Casilla and Nick Markakis each driving in two. Oh, check out this play by Casilla. That’s some Neo-from-Matrix crap right there.

White Sox 4, Athletics 2: Alex Rios and Tyler Flowers homered as the Sox earn a split against one of the hottest teams around. Sure, it comes after a stretch that put them in last place and gave new meaning to the word “punchless” but it’s at least something.

Cubs 4, Pirates 1: Cody Ransom hit a three-run homer. Which I heard on the radio while riding in a cab in Chicago. Which was kind of cool. I had a pretty sweet weekend up there. I’ll offer a couple of mini ballpark reviews of both Wrigley and U.S. Cellular, each of which I hit on Friday, later today.

Braves 8, Dodgers 1: Two homers for Dan Uggla. Homers have basically been his whole season. He’s on pace for 33 this year. He’s on pace for butt in basically every other offensive category. Yasiel Puig went 3 for 5. He’s 13 for 28 to start his career.

Royals 2, Astros 0: Look at Kansas City, winners of five straight. Sure, those wins came against Houston and Minnesota, but they still count. Luis Mendoza and Lucas Harrell had quite the duel going here, each tossing seven shutout innings. Alex Gordon and Eric Hosmer each singled in runs in the eighth.

Rockies 8, Padres 7: The Rockies were down 7-4 entering the bottom of the ninth before rallying off Luke Gregerson.  Dexter Fowler scored the tying run that frame and drove in the winning run in the tenth. Carlos Gonzalez was the man, though, making two fantastic catches and driving in two on a ninth inning double.

Yankees 2, Mariners 1: Story of Felix Hernandez’s life: one runner over seven innings but a no decision because his team’s bats couldn’t do anything. David Phelps held them at bay and then Chris Stewart drove in the go-ahead run on with a ninth inning single.

Giants 6, Diamondbacks 2: Chad Gaudin threw up during the third and sixth innings but only coughed up two runs in the fourth against the Dbacks. Kirk Gibson and Kevin Towers probably yelled at their team for not being truly gritty compared to Gaudin after this one.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

Braves Diamondbacks Baseball

Braves 10, Diamondbacks 1: Justin Upton went 4 for 5 with a homer and 2 RBI. Chris Johnson went 3 for 4 with a homer and 3 RBI. Martin Prado had a couple of hits and I suppose he was gritty. Gonna say that the first visit to Arizona for the Braves post-trade falls to their advantage.

Twins 10, White Sox 3: Aaron Hicks hit two home runs and robbed one from Adam Dunn in center. If I remember by college accounting course, that’s a +3 in the home run column.

Indians 1, Yankees 0; Yankees 7, Indians 0: An old-timey doubleheader with no multi-hour break in the middle and one ticket buying access to both games. Don’t see that happen much anymore. Takes a couple of rainouts to make it happen I guess. Justin Masterson was outstanding in the first, shutting out the Yankees and striking out nine. Vidal Nuno, I’m guessing a hair stylist/cosmetics mogul, pitched five innings of shutout ball himself in the second game, backed by a couple of RBI each from Vernon Wells and Lyle Overbay. Those three names, if I had told you were important parts of a Yankees game before the season started, would have likely had you thinking the team was in last place. They’re, instead, a game up in the AL East, tied for the best record in the American League.

Cardinals 6, Mets 3: Rick Ankiel’s Mets debut: 0 or 3 with two strikeouts. And he made a diving stab at a catch in the seventh inning, but just missed it, which led to the Cardinals scoring three runs. He said after the game if he had his own glove — which was still back in Houston — that he would have caught it. Instead he had to use a pitcher’s glove. I’m actually inclined to believe him here. Outfielder gloves are gigantic.

Brewers 5, Pirates 1: Milwaukee stole six bases off Pirates backup catcher Michael McKenry. I haven’t seen a defender so abused since Jerry Rice embarrassed Charles Dimry back in 1990. Maybe Jerry Glanville thought McKenry could handle throwing out Brewers base runners like he thought Dimry could cover Rice in man-to-man.

Cubs 9, Rockies 1: Travis Wood joins the increasingly long list of pitchers making the Rockies look lost at the plate lately, tossing seven shutout innings. The AP gamer said “He’s the first Cubs pitcher since Hippo Vaughn in 1919 to start with eight quality starts.” I’m guessing that Hippo Vaughn had no idea what a quality start was. And even if he did, it wouldn’t fit the same definition of “quality start” we know today. In 1919 it probably included cigarettes, Spanish Flu masks and trips to a brothel.

Tigers 7, Astros 2: A grand slam for Andy Dirks and, ouch, a dislocated jaw for Jose Altuve. These losses are getting increasingly painful for the Astros.

Nationals 6, Dodgers 2: Bryce Harper needed 11 stitches on his chin and he jammed his shoulder hitting the outfield wall. This is the quintessential “guy who plays really freakin’ hard” kind of injury, I suppose. He actually hit a chain link fence which sits in front of a scoreboard. Don Mattingly said after the game “That fencing we have is a little dangerous,” he said. “If you hit that, you’re going to feel it, especially face first.” You know THAT’s gonna be thrown back in Mattingly’s face during his deposition. Man.

Royals 11, Angels 4: Five hits and five RBI for Billy Butler, breaking a horrendous slump for Country Breakfast. Speaking of nicknames, Ned Yost called pitcher Luis Mendoza “Mendy” after the game, extending his streak of awful, unimaginative nicknames for his players to, like, 15. He and Eric Wedge probably have a little cheat sheet with every player’s name on his team with a little “y” next to it in case they need to use a nickname in a postgame interview.

Athletics 5, Rangers 1: Eight Ks for A.J. Griffin. Back to back homers for Yoenis Cespedes and Brandon Moss. The A’s needed this one after dropping six of their last seven.

Royals choose Luis Mendoza over Bruce Chen for final rotation spot

Kansas City's Mendoza delivers a pitch against Milwaukee in their MLB baseball game in Kansas City

Kansas City has decided on Luis Mendoza as the fifth starter, which means Bruce Chen is headed to the bullpen after leading the Royals in starts, wins, and innings last season. Of course, Chen wasn’t actually much good with a 5.07 ERA.

Luke Hochevar was previously shifted to the bullpen by the Royals, so by moving Chen there as well Kansas City is now paying $9 million to a pair of non-setup/closer relievers who both had an ERA above 5.00 last year.

As for Mendoza, he has a 4.97 ERA in 41 career starts, including a 4.19 ERA in 25 starts for the Royals last season. He’ll follow James Shields, Ervin Santana, Jeremy Guthrie, and Wade Davis in the rotation.

Royals name James Shields as Opening Day starter

Royals Shields and Davis Baseball

Making official what was expected, manager Ned Yost announced that James Shields will get the Opening Day start for the Royals.

Kansas City gave up a ton to get Shields (and Wade Davis) from Tampa Bay this offseason, parting with a four-player package that included stud outfield prospect Wil Myers, and a huge part of any optimism surrounding the Royals is built on the premise that Shields will turn the rotation around.

He’ll be followed in the rotation by Ervin Santana, Jeremy Guthrie, Davis, and either Bruce Chen or Luis Mendoza, which is a big part of why I’m very skeptical about the Royals being legitimate contenders.