Tag: Luis Jimenez

Carlos Gomez

Brewers activate Carlos Gomez from disabled list

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The Brewers have activated center fielder Carlos Gomez from the 15-day disabled list for today’s game against the Cubs. He’s batting leadoff in his return against right-hander Jake Arrieta.

Gomez has been out since April 15 due to a strained right hamstring and he has been missed in a big way. The Brewers went 3-12 during his absence and own the worst record in the majors at 5-18. While his return is welcome sight, Jonathan Lucroy and Scooter Gennett are both still on the disabled list and Aramis Ramirez is sitting out for a second straight day due to hamstring tightness.

The Brewers designated infielder Luis Jimenez for assignment in order to clear the way for Gomez’s return.

Brewers claim infielder Luis Jimenez off waivers from Angels

Luis Jimenez Getty

The Brewers announced this evening that they claimed infielder Luis Jimenez off waivers from the Angels.

Jimenez appeared in 18 games with the Angels this season and batted just .162 (6-for-37) with two doubles and a 13/0 K/BB ratio. However, the 26-year-old owns a healthy .299/.335/.509 batting line over eight seasons in the minors and slugged 21 home runs over 117 games this season in Triple-A. Granted, those numbers were boosted by the hitter-friendly Pacific Coast League. That success hasn’t translated yet.

Jimenez has mostly played third base in pro ball and figures to compete for a bench job with the Brewers in the spring.

Angels activate David Freese from the disabled list

david freese getty
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The announcement comes from the Angels’ official Twitter account …

Freese only missed 17 days with a small fracture in his right middle finger. He is back in the Angels’ starting lineup on Tuesday night against the Astros, playing third base and batting sixth.

Freese has hit just .202/.266/.286 in 24 games this season for his new team.

He was acquired from the Cardinals over the winter in a four-player trade.

Expanded instant replay is off and running

instant replay picture

There was a little bit of history this afternoon, as MLB’s new expanded instant replay made its debut in a game between the Blue Jays and Twins.

We saw it in the bottom of the sixth inning after Twins outfielder Chris Rahl was called safe at first base when a throw from Blue Jays shortstop Munenori Kawasaki pulled Jared Goedert off the bag. Blue Jays manager John Gibbons challenged the call, which was eventually upheld. The whole process took an estimated two minutes and 34 seconds.

Check out the video below:

It should be said that this isn’t exactly how things will go during the season. In the Twins-Blue Jays game, there was a video truck outside the stadium with an umpire on duty to review calls. During the season, there will be a challenge umpire at the MLBAM office in New York.

Expanded instant replay was used again later in the very same game, but this time it was initiated by the umpires, which is allowed after the seventh inning under the new system. The original call, that Twins pinch-hitter Doug Bernier beat out a grounder for an infield hit, was also upheld. We also saw replay used this afternoon in a Cactus League game between the Angels and Diamondbacks. Angels manager Mike Scioscia challenged a call after Luis Jimenez was called out at second base after a botched hit-and-run play. However, the umpire’s original call was also confirmed. Paul Hagan of MLB.com reports that the wait was around two minutes and 31 seconds.

So far, so good.

Angels protest Astros’ illegal switch, win game anyway

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim v Houston Astros

Here’s a new one: with the Angels batting with two on and two out in the seventh inning Thursday, the Astros went to bring in left-hander Wesley Wright to face left-hander J.B. Shuck. The Angels promptly countered with right-handed hitting Luis Jimenez.

And then the Astros suddenly countered with right-hander Hector Ambriz.

If that sounds unusual, well, it is. If it sounds illegal, well, it’s that, too. Except Astros rookie manager Bo Porter didn’t know it. And it seems Fieldin Culbreth’s umpiring crew didn’t know it either, even with Angels manager Mike Scioscia loudly pointing it out several times before play finally resumed several minutes later.

Make no mistake, Wright was in the game. He threw several warmup pitches before Porter went out to bring in Ambriz instead. That, of course, isn’t allowed, according to Rule 3.05. Barring an injury, any pitcher that enters a game has to face at least one batter. It’s a fairly well known rule, one that would surely be exploited frequently if it didn’t exist.

The Angels, down 5-3 at the time, immediately protested the game. It’s a protest that might have actually been upheld by the league, given that it the mistake was entirely an umpire’s error, with no judgment call being involved. Except now we’ll never find out. While Ambriz was able to escape the jam in the seventh after the illegal switch, the Angels came back and scored three runs in the eighth and won the game 6-5, essentially rendering the protest null and void.

In one way, that’s probably for the best; the Astros didn’t deserve to benefit from their illegal move. Still, it is rather too bad we didn’t see MLB’s first successful protest since 1986. Had the protest been upheld, the game would have restarted from the moment the illegal move was made, with Wright back on the mound and the Angels trailing in the top of the seventh inning.