Tag: Justin Ruggiano

SEATTLE, WA - MAY 15:  Justin Ruggiano #12 of the Seattle Mariners bats against the Boston Red Sox at Safeco Field on May 15, 2015 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Justin Ruggiano

Mariners designate Justin Ruggiano for assignment


One day after trading Welington Castillo the Diamondbacks in the Mark Trumbo deal, the Mariners have called up catcher Jesus Sucre from Triple-A Tacoma while designating outfielder Justin Ruggiano for assignment.

Acquired from the Cubs over the winter, Ruggiano is batting just .214/.321/.357 with two home runs and three RBI over 81 plate appearances this season. However, he has produced an .823 against left-handed pitchers, which is basically what he was brought in for. Rickie Weeks has been worse in part-time duty, but the Mariners decided to keep him around instead.

The 33-year-old Ruggiano is making a $2.505 million salary this season, but he could draw some interest on the trade front.

Mariners place Austin Jackson on disabled list with a right ankle sprain

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Mariners center fielder Austin Jackson was placed on the 15-day disabled list today, one day after suffering a right ankle sprain while legging out an infield grounder.

Jackson originally hoped to avoid the disabled list, but Mariners manager Lloyd McClendon told Bob Dutton of the Tacoma News Tribune that he wasn’t expected to be ready in two or three days and they didn’t want to go short-handed. Justin Ruggiano is expected to handle the majority of the playing time in center field during his absence.

Jackson is off to a slow start this season, batting just .242/.294/.326 with two home runs and four RBI over 25 games.

In addition to placing Jackson on the disabled list, the Mariners brought up infielder Chris Taylor and relievers Mark Lowe and Joe Biemel from Triple-A Tacoma while designating left-hander Mike Kickham for assignment and placing outfielder Julio Morban on the restricted list for personal reasons.

Nelson Cruz to get more playing time in the outfield

Nelson Cruz

Seth Smith is back in the Mariners’ lineup for Saturday night’s game against the Athletics after nursing a groin injury, but manager Lloyd McClendon is making another alteration. Per Bob Dutton of the Tacoma News Tribune, Nelson Cruz will “play his share of outfield”.

The Mariners signed Cruz, who led the league in home runs with 40 last season, to serve as their DH. Smith was to platoon with Justin Ruggiano in right field. However, McClendon would like to have Smith’s bat in the lineup without taxing him physically by playing him on defense with his groin injury.

McClendon said of Cruz, “I just need to be smart about when I put him out there and make sure he stays healthy throughout the year.”

Cruz seems to be okay with the change in plans. “DH is boring,” Cruz said.

2015 Preview: Seattle Mariners

Felix Hernandez

Between now and Opening Day, HardballTalk will take a look at each of baseball’s 30 teams, asking the key questions, the not-so-key questions, and generally breaking down their chances for the 2015 season. Next up: The Seattle Mariners.

The Big Question: Did they add enough offense?

The Mariners surprised in 2014, but man, if they just got a lick of offense, they could’ve surprised a lot more. Their 87 wins and near-wild card birth was achieved almost totally on the back of their pitching staff. Overall, the M’s had the best staff in all of baseball, allowing only 3.42 runs a game. The offense, however, was forgettable at best. Seattle scored 3.91 runs a game, which was third to last in the American League.

Robinson Cano is back, of course. As is third baseman Kyle Seager, who was the only other regular besides Cano to post an OPS+ above 100 in full-time play. Other positive offensive contributors in 2014 included Michael Saunders, who only played have the season and who is now gone, and Logan Morrison who played in 99 games. To improve upon 2014’s performance, the M’s needed more offense. So they went out and tried to get some.

The biggest addition was Nelson Cruz, who hit 40 homers and slugged .525 for Baltimore last year. Also added was Seth Smith, who hit .266/.367/.440 for San Diego in 2014. Given that Austin Jackson only played in 54 games last year you can think of him as an addition too. Rickie Weeks was acquired as well, though he’ll be riding pine and hitting against lefties mostly.

I sort of don’t think that’s enough. Taking Cruz out of Camden Yards and putting him in Safeco Field is going to cause him to take a step back a bit, and that’s before you acknowledge that he likely overachieved a bit last season in the first place. Seth Smith is not a cure-all, and full seasons of Morrison and Jackson could, based on their track records, mean full seasons of anything from good production to less-than-mediocrity. For the M’s to take that next step, they’re probably going to need more than this. They’ll need better production from Dustin Ackley, Brad Miller and Mike Zunino or they’ll need to add a bat at some point during the season.

None of which is to say the Mariners are in trouble. Heck, with their pitching staff (discussed more below) they’re almost instant contenders. But they were a flawed team last season which, while likely better on offense as 2015 begins, may not be quite good enough.

What else is going on?

  • The pitching is, of course, ridiculously good. Felix Hernandez needs no introduction. Hisashi Iwakuma has been one of the best kept secrets in baseball over the past three years. His late-season falloff last year is a bit worrisome, but given how James Paxton came on late in the season, the M’s may not need him to be a number two starter like he was before. Paxton has an injury history, of course, but he has gobs of talent. But wait, there’s more! Taijuan Walker has dodged injury and perpetual trade rumors to, presumably, earn a slot in the rotation following a spring in which he has tossed 18 scoreless innings with a 19/4 K/BB ratio. J.A. Happ at the back of your rotation is way better than J.A. Happ at the front of your rotation, and pitching in Safeco should help him. Roenis Elias is hanging around when someone needs a break, gets injured or forgets how to pitch. An extremely solid crew.
  • The bullpen was every bit as strong as their rotation last season, with Fernando Rodney, Danny Farquhar, Tom Wilhelmsen, Yoervis Medina and Charlie Furbush all pitching well and all returning. Rodney is occasionally heart-attack inducing, but if he implodes, Farquhar can handle the job. Expect a bit of a step back for this crew, as all bullpen performances fluctuate from season to season, but it’s a strong unit.
  • Adding Rickie Weeks was fun. Because he’s a second baseman and the Mariners, you may have noticed, have a pretty OK second baseman. That makes Weeks a super-utility guy, who will probably get looks in the outfield. Which is hilarious given that one of the reasons he was on the outs in Milwaukee was because he basically refused to play in the outfield when they asked him to. One presumes that Weeks was aware of Mr. Cano’s presence before signing his deal with the M’s, so one presumes that he’s on board with the move to the outfield now. Should be fun, though. He’s only ever played 2B and DH.
  • Another smallish addition: Justin Ruggiano, who could platoon with Seth Smith and/or Dustin Ackley. Or maybe Weeks can platoon. A lot of flexibility here, it seems, and if Lloyd McClendon feels comfortable with doing some plate-spinning with this lineup, he may be able to squeeze a bit more production out of it even without another big name addition.

Prediction: It’s hard not to like this club’s chances to to compete for a playoff spot. I think they still have enough questions on offense to where the Angels get the nod, but I think the Mariners are contenders. Second place, American League West.