Tag: Jose Lobaton


Max Scherzer gave his catchers Hublot watches for catching his no-hitter and one-hitter


Jordan Zimmermann gave Steven Souza a Best Buy gift card for the catch that saved his no hitter last year. Max Scherzer upped the ante a bit. From James Wagner of the Washington Post:

. . . after Max Scherzer tossed his career first no-hitter on June 20 against the Pirates, he bought catcher Wilson Ramos a little something for his help that day. But Scherzer didn’t stop with Ramos. He also gave catcher Jose Lobaton, who was behind the plate when Scherzer tossed a one-hitter against the Brewers on June 14, the same gift: an elegant Hublot watch.

They’re not cheap, though Wagner does not know which model was given. They retail from between $2,000 and $80,000 or even more for crazy ones.

There are some nice, graceful quotes from Scherzer and his catchers in the article. It’s been a crappy second half for Washington, but this is nice at least.

Home plate umpire Brian Knight leaves game after being hit in mask by pitch

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim v Detroit Tigers

Scary moment in today’s Phillies-Nationals game, as home plate umpire Brian Knight was forced to exit after he was hit in the facemask by a pitch in the top of the ninth inning.

Knight was hit when Nationals catcher Jose Lobaton flat out missed a 96 mph fastball from right-hander Blake Treinen. The pitch hit him square. He was noticeably woozy, but walked into the tunnel under his own power. The game then had a 12-minute delay, as second base umpire Larry Vanover put on the gear to move behind the plate.

We’ll pass along an update on Knight when it is made available. Here’s hoping for the best.

The Nationals announce their playoff roster: Rafael Soriano is there

nationals logo patch

The Washington Nationals have announced their roster for the NLDS against the Giants. It breaks down thusly:

Jerry Blevins
Gio Gonzalez
Matt Thornton
Aaron Barrett
Tyler Clippard
Doug Fister
Tanner Roark
Rafael Soriano
Craig Stammen
Drew Storen
Stephen Strasburg
Jordan Zimmermann

Jose Lobaton
Wilson Ramos

Asdrubal Cabrera
Ian Desmond
Danny Espinosa
Kevin Frandsen
Adam LaRoche
Anthony Rendon
Ryan Zimmerman

Bryce Harper
Nate Schierholtz
Denard Span
Jayson Werth

Twelve pitchers, including Rafael Soriano who had a 7.56 ERA in September and has looked awful in low-leverage situations. But no Ross Detwiler. Also: no Scott Hairston, though he was pretty crappy in the second half so it makes some sense.

Not that these are huge issues. If it comes down to a situation where having Ross Detwiler is important, a lot of things have gone wrong for Matt Williams before then. And it’s not like Kevin Frandsen can’t do most of what Hairston would likely be called on to do in a playoff game.

Things are not adding up for the Nationals right now

jayson werth getty

Here is the current state of the Nationals, summed up in one inning of baseball played Tuesday night during a 6-1 loss to the Mets:

They scored a run without producing a hit. Then their first hit of the game actually prevented a run from scoring.

Something’s just not adding up at the moment for a Nationals club that at times looks like the most-dominant team in the National League yet lately has been finding creative and agonizing ways to lose ballgames, and as a result just can’t create much space between itself and the Braves in the NL East.

“I think the way the season’s gone, the way it’s happened with injuries and guys being banged up all year, I think we’re in a pretty good spot,” Jayson Werth said. “We’re finally healthy, and I think we’re playing pretty good baseball. I think the distance will come in time.

“I feel like we’re going to go on a run here at some point, too. I like where we’re at. I like the way we’re playing night-in and night-out. We’ve been pitching good, the defense has been good, the hitting’s been good for the most part. The last couple nights we haven’t been able to get the big hit. But all in all, I feel like we’re in a good spot.”

That may prove to be the case, but at the moment, the Nationals remain in first place in the NL East more a result of the Braves’ struggles — they carried a 6-game losing streak into last night’s late game against Felix Hernandez in Seattle — than as a result of their own consistently impressive play.

They’ve now lost 8-of-13 games since Ryan Zimmerman suffered a serious hamstring strain in Colorado, and their lineup appears to be suffering for it. Though they’ve averaged 12 men on base in each of those 13 games, they’ve scored an average of only 3.5 runs. (Throw out Saturday’s 11-run explosion against the Phillies and that number drops to 2.9.)

The opportunities certainly were there for the taking Tuesday against Zack Wheeler and the Mets. Wheeler put seven men on base during a 10-batter stretch in the second and third innings, yet the only run he surrendered came via a wild pitch (following three walks).

And the hit that actually prevented a run from scoring? It came off Jose Lobaton’s bat, with runners on second and third and one out in the second. Trouble is, it struck teammate Asdrubal Cabrera as he tried to advance from second to third. By rule, Cabrera was out, Lobaton was awarded a single and Ian Desmond had to return to third base. Had Cabrera avoided contact, the groundout would’ve scored Desmond. Instead, the Nats got nothing out of it.

“I didn’t see that ball coming towards me,” Cabrera said. “He hit it hard enough that I didn’t even know. I thought it was right to my left.”

That was probably the low point of the night, though it was hardly the Nationals’ only squandered opportunity at the plate. They also twice hit into double plays with two on and nobody out (Werth and pinch-hitter Steven Souza Jr. were the culprits), saw Werth thrown out at the plate on Adam LaRoche’s sixth-inning single and saw Desmond strand six men on base via two comebackers and a strikeout.

“There’s no common thread,” manager Matt Williams insisted. “There’s no way to say: ‘OK, this is because, this is why.’ No, I mean, I haven’t seen a guy get hit with a batted ball in a while. He tried to skip over it. The ball actually was hit pretty hard by Loby and it skipped off the grass and it just nicked him. It happens sometimes. It seems like it’s going the wrong way the last couple of days, but we can turn that around tomorrow.”

The Nationals will give it another shot Wednesday night. They’ve got two more games with the Mets before heading to Atlanta for a crucial weekend series, hoping they can create enough cushion between themselves and the Braves to ensure they leave town in first place no matter the result.

“We’re pretty much aware of everything,” Werth said. “We know what’s going on around here. I feel like we’re in control of our game and where we’re at in the season. I just feel like at some point we’re going to go on a roll and rattle off some wins. We’ve got some division games coming up. August-September is really the time to go on a roll if you’re going to do it. I feel like we’re poised to finish this thing off, but we’ve got to continue to play good.”

Settling the Score: Friday’s results

Lance Lynn AP

Jordan Zimmermann was great for the Nationals last night, but Lance Lynn was just a little bit better. Lynn tossed eight scoreless innings while Matt Adams homered in his return from the disabled list as the Cardinals cooled down the Nationals with a 1-0 victory at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

Lynn retired his first 16 batters until Jose Lobaton singled with one out in the sixth inning. He ended up giving up just two hits in all while walking none and striking out eight. Trevor Rosenthal struck out three in the ninth inning and worked around a two-out error from Kolten Wong to notch the save.

As for Zimmerman, he threw his second straight complete game in the tough-luck loss. Amazingly, he needed just 76 pitches to complete his eight innings of work. Per MLB.com, that’s the fewest pitches thrown in a complete game since Aaron Cook threw 74 in a nine-inning complete game for the Rockies on July 25, 2007. The all-time record belongs to Jose Bautista — no, not that Jose Bautista — who threw a 70-pitch complete game over eight innings for the Orioles in a loss on September 3, 1988.

Your Friday box scores:

Nationals 0, Cardinals 1

Blue Jays 4, Orioles 0

Cubs 2, Phillies 1

Twins 2, Tigers 0

Padres 2, Mets 6

Pirates 8, Marlins 6 (13 innings)

Indians 3, Red Sox 10

Angels 3, Braves 4

Royals 7, White Sox 2

Reds 6, Brewers 5

Rays 6, Astros 1

Yankees 7, Athletics 0

Diamondbacks 3, Dodgers 4

Rangers 1, Mariners 0

Rockies 7, Giants 4