Tag: Jose Contreras

Royals Rangers Spring Baseball

Jose Contreras is not retiring


42-year-old Jose Contreras was trying to pitch his way onto the Rangers’ roster in March, but ultimately fell short. The right-hander posted a 10.50 ERA in six innings in the Cactus League, which led the Rangers to inform him in mid-March that he wasn’t making the team. That was the final leg in the veteran’s 11-year big league career, or so we thought.

Chris Cotillo of MLB Daily Dish reports that Contreras is not retiring. In fact, he is looking for opportunities in Japan while pitching in Mexico.

It’s unlikely that Contreras will pitch in the Majors again, but stranger things have happened. In five innings at the big league level with the Pirates last season, Contreras allowed five runs on seven hits and six walks in five innings.

Rangers sign 42-year-old Jose Contreras

Jose Contreras

Texas announced some non-roster spring training invitations and there’s a familiar name on the list: Jose Contreras.

Contreras is 42 years old and pitched just five innings for the Pirates this year after coming back from Tommy John elbow surgery. He hasn’t been healthy and effective since 2010, but on a minor-league deal … why not?

He did put up some nice numbers in the minors this year, including a 3.00 ERA and 42 strikeouts in 33 innings spent mostly at Triple-A.

Pirates release veteran right-hander Jose Contreras

Jose Contreras

This could be the end of the road for Jose Contreras. The 41-year-old right-hander was released by the Pirates this afternoon in order to clear a spot on the 40-man roster for right-hander Charlie Morton, who is making his return from Tommy John surgery today against the Giants.

Contreras underwent Tommy John surgery last year and signed a minor league deal with the Pirates over the winter. After making seven appearances in the minors, he joined Pittsburgh’s bullpen in early May and allowed five runs on seven hits and six walks over five innings prior to landing on the disabled list with lower back inflammation three weeks later. Now the Pirates have decided to turn the page.

Signed out of Cuba by the Yankees in 2002, Contreras owns a 4.57 ERA over 175 starts and 124 relief appearances in the majors. He enjoyed the bulk of his success as a starting pitcher with the White Sox from 2004-2009, including 15 wins and a 3.61 ERA during when the team won the World Series in 2005. He made his lone All-Star appearance in 2006.

Baseball’s discrimination against old players has to stop

miguel batista getty

Sorry. That headline may have been a bit dramatic. But see, I turn 40 in July. And while I’m generally cool with that — and while I am, in all honestly, in The Best Shape of My Life — it has dawned on me pretty clearly that we are almost to the point where there are NO MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYERS OLDER THAN ME.  This is sobering.

I’m thinking about this because just this afternoon Miguel Batista was released. Just yesterday Derek Lowe was DFA’d. Mariano Rivera will retire after the season is over. Those are three of the very small handful of players left who were born before July 14, 1973. And while it doesn’t mean a heck of a lot when you think hard about it, it’s kinda sobering when you think casually about it. Athletes have always, in my mind anyway, been older than me. I know that that has mostly not been true for many years now, but soon that will almost be 100% not the case.

Assuming Lowe and Batista don’t latch on, who’s left older than your aging blogger here? Darren Oliver. Jason Giambi. Henry Blanco. Jose Contreras. Raul Ibanez. Andy Pettitte. LaTroy Hawkins. Ramon Ortiz. Bartolo Colon. That’s it, I believe.

Hold on guys. Hold on with all of your might.

The worst Opening Day starts of the 2000’s

Bases emblazoned with Opening Day sit ready to be installed on the field on opening night of the MLB season in Houston

Opening Day is set to kick off in just a few minutes when the Houston Astros take on the Texas Rangers. The Rangers’ Matt Harrison opposes the Astros’ Bud Norris. Though Norris isn’t terrible, he isn’t exactly the type of starter you envision kicking off your team’s season on Opening Day.

With that said, let’s take a quick look back at some of the worst Opening Day starts of the 2000’s.

April 1, 2011: Roberto Hernandez (Indians) vs. White Sox

Hernandez, then known as Fausto Carmona, was hit right from the start. He allowed two runs in the first, four in the third, and was charged for four more in the fourth inning as the Sox put up an eight-spot. Adam Dunn and Carlos Quentin homered in the third, but the rest of the damage was done by singles and doubles.

Hernandez’s final line: 3 IP, 11 H, 10 ER, 1 BB, 5 K

April 5, 2010: Carlos Zambrano (Cubs) vs. Braves

The Cubs staked Zambrano to a three-run lead in the first inning, but he gave it back and then some in the bottom half of the inning. On a walk, four singles, and a three-run home run by Jason Heyward, the Braves scored six runs. In the second, Zambrano hit Martin Prado, then Chipper Jones grounded out but Prado ended up coming all the way around to score on a Zambrano throwing error, and Brian McCann homered before the right-hander was finally removed from the game.

Zambrano’s final line: 1.1 IP, 6 H, 8 ER, 2 BB, 1 K

April 2, 2007: Jose Contreras (White Sox) vs. Indians

Grady Sizemore led the game off with a home run, then three more Indians reached base without making an out — all singles. Josh Barfield landed a crushing blow with two outs, hitting a two-run triple to right field that brought the Indians’ lead to 5-0. Contreras came out for the second inning, but walked Sizemore, then surrendered a double to Trot Nixon to put runners on second and third with no outs. Travis Hafner hit a grounder to shortstop Juan Uribe, but he made an errant throw to first base, allowing Sizemore and Nixon to score, chasing Contreras in the process.

Contreras’s final line: 1 IP, 7 H, 8 R (7 ER), 1 BB, 1 K

April 3, 2006: Jon Lieber (Phillies) vs. Cardinals

Lieber was on the hook for eight runs in his start, which is amazing considering he exited the third inning having allowed only two runs on a Jim Edmonds RBI double in the first and an Albert Pujols solo home run in the third. The eventual World Series champions strung together a bunch of hits against Lieber in the fourth: five singles and a triple. Lieber left with his team down 5-0 with one out and the bases loaded. Julio Santana came in relief but he only poured more gasoline on the fire. Pujols hit a sacrifice fly, Edmonds was walked to re-load the bases, and Scott Rolen hit a grand slam to put his team up 10-0.

Lieber’s final line: 3.1 IP, 9 H, 8 ER, 1 BB, 3 K

April 4, 2005: Javier Vazquez (Diamondbacks) vs. Cubs

The first inning wasn’t that bad for Vazquez. He surrendered four hits, leading to two runs, but they were all singles. The Cubs started crushing everything Vazquez threw in the second. He got Michael Barrett to pop out to lead off the inning, but pitcher Carlos Zambrano reached base on a double, which was then followed up by three consecutive singles and an Aramis Ramirez double, putting the Cubs up 6-0. Jeremy Burnitz struck out, but Derrek Lee extended the inning with a double to left, driving in the Cubs’ seventh run, pushing Vazquez out of the game.

Vazquez’s final line: 1.2 IP, 10 H, 7 ER, 0 BB, 2 K