Tag: Jordan Pacheco

Jordan Pacheco

Diamondbacks activate Jake Lamb, designate Jordan Pacheco for assignment

Leave a comment

The Diamondbacks activated third baseman Jake Lamb from the 15-day disabled list, the club announced on Twitter. To make room for him on the roster, C/IF Jordan Pacheco has been designated for assignment.

Lamb, 24, had been sidelined since mid-April with a stress fracture in his left foot. He was off to a hot start, batting .414/.514/.690 with one home run and nine RBI in 35 plate appearances.

Pacheco, 29, had been serving as the Diamondbacks’ back-up catcher, but he became expendable after the club acquired Jarrod Saltalamacchia and traded for Welington Castillo. He is hitting .242/.333/.333 with two home runs and eight RBI in 78 plate appearances.

Diamondbacks confirm prospect Peter O’Brien is now a full-time outfielder

Peter O'Brien
Leave a comment

The catching-starved Diamondbacks intend to move forward with prospect Peter O’Brien playing the outfield on a full-time basis, MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert reports. O’Brien went into May without having caught a game at Triple-A Reno, but went behind the plate intermittently as the month went on and the Diamondbacks’ catching situation worsened with Tuffy Gosewisch’s ACL injury.

O’Brien, 24, is hitting .341/.382/.653 with 12 home runs and 46 RBI in 191 plate appearances with Reno thus far, his first taste of Triple-A competition. The Diamondbacks acquired him from the Yankees at the deadline last July in the Martin Prado trade.

The D-Backs will use Jarrod Saltalamacchia as their regular catcher with Jordan Pacheco serving as the back-up.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

Noah Syndergaard

Mets 7, Phillies 0: The Noah Syndergaard Show. He shut out the Phillies while pitching into the eighth inning and went 3-for-3 with a homer. And it wasn’t a cheapie, either. It was cranked an estimated 430 feet:


Lucas Duda homered twice, but forget him. First basemen are supposed to hit homers.

Indians 12, Rangers 3: I was on a radio segment yesterday that taped in the morning to be played in the evening. In the morning I was asked about the Texas Rangers hot run of late and as part of that I mentioned that Colby Lewis pitching much better this year than last was key. Bet that sounded good a few hours after Lewis was beat up to the tune of ten runs on eleven hits in two and two-thirds innings. Carlos Santana and Lonnie Chisenhall each drove in three. Jason Kipnis had three hits. He’s hitting .342/.412/.537 yet didn’t even make the top five vote-getters at second base in the first round of All-Star balloting.

Rockies 6, Reds 4: Some more lack of respect: Nolan Arenado was fifth among NL third baseman in All-Star voting. Which, sure, I can see Matt Carpenter ahead of him and realize Kris Bryant is the big new star, but David Wright is being thrown on the “bring out your dead” cart from the Holy Grail and he’s a slot up on our man from Colorado here. No worries, all he did was hit a three-run homer here. In his past four games he’s 9-for-16 with three homers, a triple and 10 RBI.

Pirates 5, Marlins 2: Six in a row for the Pirates thanks to a five-run seventh inning. All of those runs came with two outs. Not gonna say it’s going well for Pittsburgh, but Starling Marte worked a bases-loaded walk during that rally. Marte’s career K/BB ratio is *does some frantic tapping on a calculator* “EEEEEEEEEEEEEE48.”  Well, crap. I broke my dang calculator.

White Sox 5, Blue Jays 3: Adam LaRoche singled in the go-ahead run in the 10th to help break a four-game skid. Jose Abreu had three hits with two RBI and scored the winning run. A fortunate win for the Chisox, as David Robertson blew yet another save here on yet another Josh Donaldson homer.

Yankees 4, Royals 2: Alex Rodriguez hit a three-run homer which pushed him past Lou Gehrig’s American League record for RBI. The Yankees swept the Royals in three, outscoring them 23-4 in the process. I still don’t know if anyone knows what to make of this Yankees team. You got old guys and hurt guys but all of their guys, in terms of talent, are pretty great. It’s like your old dog, maybe. These days he sits around and sleeps a lot. But sometimes you see him bound up and run after a rabbit or something based on muscle memory and habit. At this point I could see them bashing their way into the playoffs or finishing in fourth with half the roster on the DL. Lucky for them no one else seems to want to win the AL East.

Twins 6, Red Sox 4: I’ll outsource this one to blogmate Aaron Gleeman, who wrote about the Twins’ sweeping the Sox and their improbable run to first place and the second-best record in the AL in the early going:

I wrote a lengthy article on my Twins-centric personal blog about how they’ve been winning so far, but the short version is great hitting with runners in scoring position, Glen Perkins being perfect in the closer role, and the starting rotation going from historically inept to merely sort of bad. If you want the long version, there are 1,200 more words here. As a lifelong Twins fan I have no idea how long it’ll continue, but whatever. Beats the hell out of looking ahead to next year’s draft already, no matter what.

Mariners 3, Rays 0: I wrote this game up yesterday. All I know is that King Felix is absolutely amazing. And that maybe Kevin Cash shouldn’t have taken Chris Archer out of the game after 95 pitches given how dominating he was.

Giants 3, Brewers 1: Ryan Vogelsong started poorly this year but has now won three in a row. He’s a microcosm of the Giants’ season I guess. He allowed one run in six innings here and struck out five. Joe Panik hit a two-run homer. The Giants hot steak has been something. Now, to be fair, 11 of their past 14 have come against three of the worst teams in baseball in the Brewers, Rockies and Reds, but still.

Tigers 3, Athletics 2: Yoenis Cespedes hit a three-run homer to break a scoreless tie against his old mates — at least those of them that are left from last year — and six Tigers pitchers combined to six-hit the A’s.

Orioles 5, Astros 4: On another radio show I was on yesterday morning which, I hope anyway, was live, I talked about how Chris Davis needs to step it up to help the O’s. Step it up he did, hitting two homers, both tie-breakers. Jimmy Paredes had two hits and stole home. It was a delayed double steal, which, eh, but a steal of home is a steal of home I suppose.

Nationals 3, Cubs 0: Bryce Harper homered again and Max Scherzer struck out 13 in seven shutout innings, lowering his ERA to 1.51. Someone ask Thom Loverro of the Washington Times if that’s good enough.

Cardinals 4, Diamondbacks 3: A ninth inning rally gave the Cards the sweep. Jason Heyward homered to tie it leading off the ninth. Then Peter Bourjos, running home from third on a Jhonny Peralta chopper, slid into catcher Jordan Pacheco’s leg as he was forced out at home. That threw Pacheco off balance, causing his throw down to first to get Peralta to sail over the first baseman’s head which, in turn, allowed Matt Carpenter to come around to score the walkoff win. Crazy:


Padres 5, Angels 4: Justin Upton and Matt Kemp hit RBI singles in the seventh and Will Middlebrooks had a two-run homer to back Andrew Cashner, who tends not to get a ton of run support.

Braves 3, Dodgers 2: Juan Uribe came back against the team he played for just the night before and went 0-for-3 with a couple of strikeouts. The Braves didn’t need his production, however, as Alex Wood allowed only one run in seven innings. Andrelton Simmons had two hits and scored the go-ahead run on a wild pitch. Cameron Maybin homered.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

Empty Camden Yards

source: AP

Orioles 8, White Sox 2: I talked about this as I was watching it yesterday, but the key takeaways for me were how (a) an empty ballpark actually makes Hawk Harrelson’s commentary . . . sort of OK; and (b) the blistering pace. As a fan it was easy to get used to watching this one pretty quickly because, really, a game on TV is in some ways like watching a game filmed at a studio. It’s all pitcher-batter-play-in-the-filed focused in ways that watching a ballgame at the park isn’t. The lack of crowd noise made a big difference initially, but it was easy to ignore after an inning or two. As for the pace, commenter 2131andbeyond hit the nail on the head, I think:

As someone who has attended ~400 games at Oriole Park over the last decade, what I noticed during today’s action was simply the heavy focus on the game itself. Lack of distraction, so to say. There are so many interactions throughout the game involving fans, from tossing balls and even checking out foul balls, that add up over time. Also, no sound effects or music between pitches and at bats, which generally guys will let play out before pitches are thrown. In this case, after a home run, the celebration generally would have gone on 20-30 seconds longer, but didn’t occur. Those small bits of entertainment value, while also keeping the players fully focused on the game and nothing else, easily adds up to a good chunk of time over nine innings.

There was a lot of getaway day first-pitch swinging too, but I agree that the players just got on with it a lot more than usual. I’m sure the atmosphere, or lack thereof, had a lot to do with it.

Angels 6, Athletics 3: Mike Trout homered and hit a bases-loaded double. Albert Pujols left the game with a leg injury. It doesn’t seem terribly serious, but the Angels are going to err on the side of caution by exiling him to another state, removing all evidence of his existence from the ballpark, initiating legal proceedings in an effort to claw back tens of millions of dollars for his betrayal and offering pissy little statements about how he has yet to apologize.

Nationals 13, Braves 4: I guess Tuesday night’s game opened the floodgates for the Nats’ offense. Here they rattled out 15 hits, including a three-run single for Jordan Zimmermann. The Braves have lost seven of nine. We’re seeing a lot fewer stories about their grit and play-the-game-the-right-way attitude these days, huh? I guess that stuff doesn’t matter too much when you, you know, suck.

Marlins 7, Mets 3: Ichiro hit a three-run homer, giving the Marlins some insurance runs and giving hope to all of us old S.O.B.s over 40. Giancarlo Stanton also homered, reminding us that this is a young man’s world. Dee Gordon added two more hits, raising his average to a four-speed dual-quad posi-traction .409. The old S.O.Bs out there will get that reference.

Brewers 8, Reds 3: Ryan Braun hit a grand slam and a solo shot. There were seven homers total in this game, accounting for 10 of the 11 total runs scored. Reds starter Michael Lorenzen — no relation to Moose; unsure about Jared — gave up three of them in his big league debut.

Rays 3, Yankees 2: A-Rod had a bad game — 0-for-6 with four whiffs — and has been hitting poorly, but I question whether he is really worth the first 11 paragraphs of a 20-paragraph AP game story. Especially in a game where one of the teams’ bullpens combined for seven scoreless innings, following up a starter in Drew Smyly who struck out ten in the six. The Yankees’ pen allowed one run in seven and a third, but that one run — a James Loney RBI single in the 13th — was the difference.

Tigers 10, Twins 7: Two homers for Miguel Cabrera brings his line to .370/.453/.630 with five bombs and 17 RBI. Yawn. Neither of his homers was as unconventional as James McCann’s, whose first career homer was an inside-the-park number. McCann is a catcher of course. Check it out (and try to ignore the fact that Jordan Schafer went to his right several steps before going back on the ball):


Astros 7, Padres 2: Six straight wins for Houston, including this three-game sweep in which they outscored the Padres 30-9. Dallas Keuchel allowed only three hits in eight innings and raised his record to 3-0, but saw his ERA rise from 0.62 to 0.73. I guess that just shows that he’s been pitching to the score. The Padres have dropped seven of eight.

Red Sox 4, Blue Jays 1: Rick Porcello turned in a performance that the Sox really needed from their staff, allowing one run on two hits over seven innings. Hanley Ramirez homered once again. He has 10 in the month of April.

Indians 7, Royals 5: Jason Kipnis homered and drove in four. Scary moment in the fifth when Danny Salazar beaned Alcides Escobar. Escobar seems OK and it did not seem intentional, so there was no retaliation from the Bad Boys of Baseball. That’s saying something since Yordano Ventura was on the mound. Of course, since he has a suspension pending, him hitting an Indians batter here would be like a guy knocking over a liquor store while out on bail and awaiting sentencing for grand theft auto.

Cardinals 5, Phillies 2: Peter Bourjos showed off his legs. He hit a game-tying RBI triple, scored on a fielder’s choice that a lot of dudes wouldn’t have scored on and robbed Chase Utley of extra bases with a nice catch. He got caught stealing once, though, so I suppose his legs have their limits. Ryan Howard homered, but he also grounded out into the shift three times. After the game:

“No, I don’t like it at all,” Howard said. “That’s four hits. I’m hitting the ball hard, it’s just that guys are playing shifts.”

Well, sorry.

Mariners 5, Rangers 2: Logan Morrison was 4-for-5 and doubled in a couple of runs. Felix Hernandez improved his record to 4-0. Used to be he’d allow two runs while pitching into the seventh and come away with a no decision or worse. Four errors for the Rangers.

Pirates 8, Cubs 1: Andrew McCutchen went 2-for-5 with a two-run triple and notched his 1,000th career hit. Which seems kind of crazy, but that’s how time works for you when you’re an old S.O.B. You think things like “wait, McCutchen is only playing in his fourth or fifth season, right?” Then you look up and realize you’ve forgotten years. Sometimes decades. Because the 1990s were just a few — wait, holy crap! Gerrit Cole struck out eight and allowed only an unearned run in six innings.

Diamondbacks 9, Rockies 1: When Josh Collmenter is on, he’s on. And here he was on, tossing eight innings, striking out six, not walking anyone and allowing an unearned run. Jordan Pacheco hit a three-run homer and Yasmany Tomas drove in three.

Dodgers 7, Giants 3: Homers from Joc Pederson, Adrian Gonzalez, Andre Ethier and Jimmy Rollins. The game story talks about how it’s hard to do that at night in L.A. because of the marine layer. My San Diego-living brother talks about the marine layer all the time. Kind of bitching about it because he’s been in California for 20 years now and gets all complainy when it isn’t 75 degrees or more with sun beating down on him directly. Personally, I think the term “marine layer” is a beautiful term, just as far as language goes, and like to say it a lot. Marine layer, marine layer, marine layer. Besides, to have it, it means you have an ocean next you, so stop whining, Curtis.

Wait, sorry. That got a bit personal. I’ll just text him next time.

Report: Marlins talking to five teams about a trade involving Jarrod Saltalamacchia

Miami Marlins v New York Mets

The Marlins designated catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia for assignment earlier today and Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe hears that the team’s general manager, Dan Jennings, has already talked to five teams about a potential trade.

ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick pegs the Red Sox, Indians, Mariners, and Diamondbacks among the potential landing spots. And sure enough, Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic hears that the Diamondbacks are having “internal discussions” about the possibility. It’s not a bad idea when you consider their current catching tandem consists of Tuffy Gosewisch and Jordan Pacheco.

Saltalamacchia owns a disappointing .209/.310/.351 batting line in 123 games dating back to the start of last season and is owed $7 million this season and $8 million next season, so the Marlins would have to pick up most of the tab to make a deal palatable. They have 10 days to find a match. Otherwise, he’ll hit free agency and be able to sign with a team of his choosing at the major league minimum.