Tag: Joe Maddon

Joe Maddon
AP Photo

Joe Maddon criticizes Cardinals’ book of unwritten rules


Things got testy in Friday afternoon’s game between the Cardinals and Cubs. Cubs starter Dan Haren hit Matt Holliday in the head with a fastball, forcing the outfielder from the game in the fifth inning. Both benches were promptly warned by home plate umpire Dan Bellino. Nevertheless, Cardinals reliever Matt Belisle attempted to exact revenge in the seventh, throwing a fastball at first baseman Anthony Rizzo. Belisle was tossed from the game.

Cubs manager Joe Maddon wasn’t happy about the Cardinals’ attempt to get revenge. He defended Haren, saying his pitch to Holliday was “an absolute mistake” and that there was “no malicious intent whatsoever”.

Following that, he criticized the book of unwritten rules that the Cardinals purport to follow. Maddon said, “I never read that particular book that the Cardinals wrote way back in the day. I was a big Branch Rickey fan, but I never read that this book that the Cardinals had written regarding how to play baseball.”

Maddon was saying that in reference to the Cardinals playing their first baseman behind Chris Denorfia, who had walked and was on first base with one out in the bottom of the eighth with the Cubs leading by five runs. He threatened that, in the future, he would have his runner steal second base. According to the book of unwritten rules, teams shouldn’t take advantage of that situation given their lead. But, as Maddon explained, playing for an extra run would help them in the next inning as it would prevent them from having to warm up closer Hector Rondon.

Maddon also said about the Cubs, “We don’t start stuff, but we will stop stuff.” Here’s video from the Chicago Daily Herald:

It didn’t seem like it took long for the Cubs/Cardinals rivalry to heat up again. Following Friday’s win, the Cubs are 86-61, six games behind the first-place Cardinals in the NL Central. The Cubs trail the Pirates by 1.5 games for the first NL Wild Card slot.

Joe Maddon believes 'real men wear plaid'


Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon has a plea to Rays fans out there (from the St. Petersburg Times):

“Real men wear plaid,” Maddon said. “Come on out in your plaids — that would be awesome. To have this ballpark plaided out would be very cool.”

Maddon invented the “Brayser,” a blue and white plaid blazer that his team embraced this season. And I have to admit it would be pretty cool to see Tropicana Field clad in plaid when the Rays take the field for Game 1 against the Rangers on Wednesday. Only one problem: like many creative geniuses, Maddon has focused on the making of his invention, but not the production, and there are only 54 “Braysers” in existence.

So dig into those closets, Rays fans. You’re on your own.

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It's high fashion: Introducing the 'BRayser'


Everything is going right for the Tampa Bay Rays lately. They just completed an impressive sweep of the Texas Rangers, signed their top draft picks and are stocking up on some alleged pitching talent.

So why the need for a wardrobe gimmick? Because it’s pretty dang sweet, that’s why.

It’s called the “BRayser” — which in case you couldn’t figure it out, is what you get when you combine “Rays” and “Blazer.” I can only assume it’s an ode to Dodgeball’s “Blazer”, and it’s also mandatory dress for the team’s West Coast road trip that begins on Thursday in Oakland.

That’s B.J. Upton wearing his BRayser in the photo above.

Joe Maddon, who got in trouble earlier this season for wearing a hoodie, loves the look:

“They’re fabulous,” he said. “They met with everybody’s approval.” Local fashion designer Julia Alarcon did the creative work, with Rays TV man Todd Kalas coordinating the months-long project.

In 2008 it was Mohawks, last year it was hair dye, this year it’s the BRayser, all in the name of building team unity.

What will it be next year? Maddon glasses for everyone? Or perhaps matching championship rings?

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Protestors to picket the Cubs-Dbacks game. I kinda wish they wouldn't


As you probably know, Arizona passed a law that makes the failure to carry immigration documents a crime and gives
the police broad power to detain anyone suspected of being in the
country illegally. Supporters believe it to be a necessary move to combat illegal immigration to the state. Opponents call it an open invitation for
harassment and discrimination against Hispanics regardless of their
citizenship status.  I have my own opinions about it all and I’m sure you do too, but that’s not terribly important in this forum because this forum is about baseball.

But the controversy over Arizona SB 1070 is now hitting baseball, as people are protesting the Arizona Diamondbacks wherever they go:

Today at Chicago’s Wrigley Field and in just about every city the team
visits, there is expected to be a protest outside the stadium against
Arizona’s new immigration-enforcement law, Senate Bill 1070. One of the people organizing and encouraging such protests is Tony
Herrera, the Arizona representative for a national movement (it has a
Facebook page) called “Boycott Arizona 2010.”

“This team is an ambassador for Arizona,” Herrera told me. “And the
owner, Mr. (Ken) Kendrick, is a big supporter of Republican politics.
This new law was a Republican bill. Until the law is changed, there
should be protests.”

Some people are also suggesting that Major League Baseball take away the 2011 All-Star Game which will take place in Chase Field.  The odds of that happening are somewhere below the odds of Lou Dobbs joining those protests, but people are asking it all the same.

I like to rouse rabble as much as the next guy, but protests based on attenuated links kind of irk me. Yes, the Dbacks are from Arizona and yes the team’s owner — one of several dozen in a large ownership group, by the way — generally supports the party that sponsored the legislation, but the Diamondbacks and any fans heading to Wrigley Field this weekend are innocent bystanders here. I’m guessing they no more appreciate having a ballgame interrupted by immigration politicking any more than Super Bowl viewers were interested in listening to Tim Tebow go on whatever it was he was going on about in that boring little commercial that caused all the hubub.

People can obviously do what they want because the First Amendment is pretty damn awesome, but I can’t help but think these sorts of protests and calls for boycots are at best ineffective in furthering the protesters’ cause and potentially detrimental. If you’re running late to the game and you have to navigate a picket line outside the gate, you’re probably not going to be very sympathetic to the protester’s cause.  And if calls for boycotts are actually heeded they won’t hurt the owners of the Diamondbacks nearly as much as they’ll hurt the concession guys and stadium sweepers who get laid off because business is slow.  These things are great for some short-lived publicity, but short-lived publicity is generally not the best way to affect political change. That takes sustained activism, legal action and other less-sexy things than jumping in front of TV cameras.

But I guess my biggest beef with this sort of thing is that when I go to a baseball game, I’m looking to escape reality for a little while and it angries up my blood if I have to have to think about the real world for those three hours.  Maybe that makes me a bad citizen or something, but it’s how I feel. And I feel that way whether I agree with the protesters or not.

UPDATE: If you’re looking for more on this, BIll at the Daily Something has some.

Joe Maddon, Bill Belichick are brothers in casual wear


belichick-hoodie.jpgIt’s a little bit late since the Great Joe Maddon Hoodie Controversy was solved last week, but the Tampa Bay Rays manager nonetheless received some support in his quest for wardrobe freedom when he received a hoodie in the mail from none other than Patriots coach – and noted hoodie enthusiast — Bill Belichick.

The Patriots hoodie came embroidered with a “J.M.” on the front, making it pretty fancy by hoodie standards. Maddon called the gift “very cool,” and he should have just left it at that. Instead, he went on to tell the Associated Press:

“It’s quite an accomplishment, quite an achievement to get something from a coach who’s won the Super Bowl,” Maddon said.

Yes, it is quite the accomplishment. Much like it was an accomplishment for me to receive a letter in the mail from the former sidekick on The Tonight Show. (I may already be a millionaire!)

Maddon says he won’t wear the hoodie. After all he’s a smart guy and knows MLB will frown on any of their managers wearing NFL gear. But he will display the sweatshirt in his office in a nice show of solidarity with his brother in casual wear.

One question though. Do you think they’ll let Bob Huggins be a part of their club?

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