Tag: Joaquin Arias

San Francisco Giants v Arizona Diamondbacks

Casey McGehee leaves game with left knee strain

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The injuries keep on coming for the Giants.

According to Alex Pavlovic of CSNBayArea.com, third baseman Casey McGehee left tonight’s game against the Padres with a left knee strain. He suffered the injury after getting out of the batter’s box on a fly out to end the bottom of the first inning.

Brandon Belt is currently sidelined with a mild groin strain, so the Giants were forced to go with Matt Duffy at first base and Joaquin Arias at third base. The club could call up Adam Duvall from Triple-A Sacramento if McGehee needs a stint on the disabled list.

McGehee, who was acquired from the Marlins over the winter, batted .287/.355/.357 with four home runs and 76 RBI across 160 games last season.

11 years ago today the Yankees traded for Alex Rodriguez

Alex Rodriguez

On this date 11 years ago the Rangers traded Alex Rodriguez to the Yankees in exchange for Alfonso Soriano and Joaquin Arias.

At the time Rodriguez was 28 years old and the reigning American League MVP. He’s been with the Yankees ever since, hitting .291 with 309 homers and a .920 OPS in 1,293 games while winning two more MVP awards and one World Series title.

And as you might expect from a longtime Yankee who performed so well, both in terms of individual accomplishments and winning a championship–including hitting .365 with six homers and a 1.308 OPS during the 2009 title run–Rodriguez is universally beloved by all New Yorkers and embraced by team management.

Wait, no. Scratch that. The exact opposite. Happy anniversary!

Giants pull off a victory-by-committee


In beating the Royals 11-4 in Saturday’s Game 4, the Giants tied a postseason record by getting hits from 11 different players and used six pitchers, the last five of which combined for 6 1/3 scoreless innings of relief.

The Giants had 16 hits in all, the most in a World Series game since the Red Sox collected 17 in pummeling the Rockies 13-1 in the 2007 World Series. They were the sixth team in postseason history to have 11 different players with hits, but the first to do so in a World Series since the Yankees in a 16-3 rout of the Pirates in 1960.

Three Giants — Matt Duffy, pitcher Yusmeiro Petit and Joaquin Arias — went 1-for-1 in the contest.

All of that offense allowed the Giants to overcome a rough outing from Ryan Vogelsong, who just couldn’t overcome a bunch of misfortune in the third. He ended up allowing four runs in 2 2/3 innings.

It was the 16th time in World Series history that a team had managed to win despite a starter going three or fewer innings and giving up at least four runs. It last happened with the Angels against the Giants in Game 2 of the 2002 World Series. Kevin Appier as tagged for five runs in two innings in that one, but Giants starter Russ Ortiz was even worse, giving up seven runs in 1 2/3 innings before being pulled. Appier was replaced by John Lackey in what ended up being an 11-10 win for the Angels.

The winner was Petit, who extended his postseason scoreless streak to 12 innings with three shutout innings in Game 4. He’s allowed a total of four hits in his three extended appearances. Petit is the first reliever ever with three outings of three or more scoreless innings in a single postseason. Bruce Kison (1971), Dick Drago (1975) and Sparky Lyle (1977) both had two apiece.

Pablo Sandoval, Brandon Belt come through to put Giants up 7-4 going into the seventh

Pablo Sandoval
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The Giants were one weak ground ball or fly ball away from squandering a bases-loaded opportunity, but Pablo Sandoval and Brandon Belt made sure their club was able to capitalize on the opportunity. The Giants put their first two batters on base on consecutive bloop singles by pinch-hitter Joaquin Arias and Gregor Blanco against Royals rookie Brandon Finnegan. Rookie Joe Panik then bunted both runners over to second and third base, which forced Royals manager Ned Yost to order Finnegan to intentionally walk Buster Posey to load the bases.

Hunter Pence grounded into a 6-2 fielder’s choice, putting the Royals closer to an escape from a tense situation. Sandoval, however, wasn’t having it. He swung at Finnegan’s first offering, ripping a two-run single up the middle to break a 4-4 tie. Brandon Belt followed up with a ground ball single into right-center, pushing the Giants’ lead up to 7-4. Juan Perez grounded out to second base to end the inning.

The Giants have now scored six unanswered runs against the Royals. They’ll head into the seventh inning with a three run lead and nine outs to go. Yusmeiro Petit pitched three scoreless innings of relief but was replaced by Jeremy Affeldt to start the next frame.

Cardinals have early lead over Giants in NLCS Game 4

kolten wong getty

The Cardinals are trying to get the National League Championship Series back to St. Louis, and they’re off to a decent start here in Game 4 at AT&T Park.

Matt Carpenter opened the top of the first with a leadoff double, Jon Jay followed with walk, and then Matt Adams laced a one-out RBI single to shallow left field. San Francisco retaliated with a run in the bottom of the first, but the Cards answered right back when Kolten Wong doubled to deep center in the top of the second and A.J. Pierzynski drove him in.

Wong would strike again in the top of the third inning, slugging a solo shot over the right field wall. Shortly before Wong’s blast, Matt Holliday raced home on a double play groundout by Jhonny Peralta. It was a 4-1 lead at that point and Giants manager Bruce Bochy opted to pinch-hit Joaquin Arias for starting pitcher Ryan Vogelsong to open the bottom of the third. That worked out well, as Arias singled to center and then made it home on a two-out RBI single by Buster Posey. Pablo Sandoval followed with a walk and Hunter Pence drove Posey in for the Giants’ third run through three innings against Cardinals starter Shelby Miller.

St. Louis leads Game 4 by a score of 4-3 in what could be a back-and-forth marathon.

San Francisco has a 2-1 lead in this National League Championship Series.