Tag: Jeremy Jeffress

Jeremy Jeffress

Not all teams turn their backs on players with drug problems


As the Angels’ appalling treatment of Josh Hamilton wears on, Bob Nightengale of USA Today reminds us that not all teams turn their back on players with drug problems in a craven effort to recoup some money they agreed to pay. For example, the Milwaukee Brewers and their treatment of pitcher Jeremy Jeffress, who was twice suspended for marijuana use while in the minor leagues:

Jeffress, suspended for 50 games in 2007, and 100 games in 2009, had the Brewers awaiting him with open arms. They placed him in drug rehabilitation centers after each suspension, and if not for them, Jeffress wonders whether he’d even have a baseball career.

Jeffress and his agent both wonder how the Angels could be doing what they’re doing. So do I. So do many people.

The Angels should either welcome Hamilton back, stop the media campaign and stop their attempts to circumvent his contract or they should simply release him and allow him to get on with his career with another club. That they’re unwilling to do either of those things reflects terribly on them as a club and on its owner as a human being.

Bud Selig can’t remember the last domestic violence incident in Major League Baseball

Bud Selig

Bud Selig was asked yesterday about the Ray Rice situation and Major League Baseball’s approach to domestic violence. He mentioned that, in the past, having a league policy on domestic violence had been discussed but tabled in favor of these things being handled on a case-by-case basis. He also said this:

“We haven’t had any cases I’m happy to say for a long, long time. I can’t remember when the last time was,” Selig said. “I’m grateful for that. But we deal with situations as they occur. The only thing I want to say, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, we are a social institution and I’m proud of our record in dealing with a myriad of subjects, and we deal with them, I think, quite effectively.”

Maybe I’m missing one that is more recent, but a quick check of HBT posts shows that Everth Cabrera was charged with domestic violence in 2012. The charges were dropped. Former major leaguers Andruw Jones was arrested for domestic violence in late 2012 and Wladimir Balentien earlier this year. Francisco Rodriguez was charged in 2012, with charges eventually being dismissed. Manny Ramirez was charged in 2012 with charges dismissed when his wife was “uncooperative” with the investigation. Pitcher Jeremy Jeffress was arrested in 2012. Bobby Cox was just inducted to the baseball Hall of Fame two months ago. Indeed, there is a long and lamentable list of domestic violence incidents — some of them very serious — in recent baseball history.

Maybe two years ago was “a long, long time.” Maybe it wasn’t. Maybe baseball’s many past cases of domestic violence can be relegated to a past in which attention was simply not paid to such matters like it is now. I wouldn’t take that approach, but I do appreciate that baseball cannot do anything about incidents from the past now.

But it certainly can avoid taking Selig’s approach of “well, we’ve been good for a while so we need not do anything about it now.” That’s exactly what led to the NFL being where it is right now. Having a reactionary, ad-hoc approach to such matters instead of making its values with respect to domestic violence clear and putting all players and employees on notice that committing such acts will lead to consequences, not just from the law, but the league.

It’s why baseball needs a domestic violence policy now.

Blue Jays designate Jeremy Jeffress for assignment

Jeremy Jeffress Getty

Sportsnet.ca’s Ben Nicholson-Smith reports that the Blue Jays have designated pitcher Jeremy Jeffress for assignment. The club recalled right-hander Chad Jenkins from Triple-A to take his spot on the roster. Jeffress, who earned a spot on the Jays’ 25-man roster with a solid spring showing, allowed three runs in one inning in his 2014 debut on March 31, surrendered two hits and two walks in 1 1/3 innings on Thursday, and allowed one run in one inning Friday night. His season ERA currently stands at 10.80.

Jeffress, taken by the Brewers in the first round of the 2006 draft, went to the Royals in the Zack Greinke trade in December 2010, then was purchased by the Blue Jays in November 2012. He has not had much success in 51 1/3 innings at the big league level, sporting a 4.44 career ERA.

Ranking the bullpens: 2014 edition

Detroit Tigers v Atlanta Braves

We tried this with the rotations the other day. Once again, I’ll be dipping into my 2014 projections here to rank the bullpens. To come up with the following bullpen ERAs, I simply combined each team’s seven highest-IP relievers, according to my projections.

Royals – 2.93
Red Sox – 3.14
Athletics – 3.16
Rangers – 3.31
Tigers – 3.35
Rays – 3.36
Blue Jays – 3.39
Twins – 3.40
Mariners – 3.42
Indians – 3.49
Orioles – 3.55
White Sox – 3.58
Angels – 3.58
Yankees – 3.77
Astros – 3.97

– That’s a weaker showing for the Rays than I would have guessed, but they still have excellent depth and a couple of the lesser knowns will surely surprise, as they always do. My projections call for essentially the same ERAs from their 6th-12th relievers.

– The Blue Jays would have come in fourth here had I used both Dustin McGowan and Jeremy Jeffress instead of adding in Esmil Rogers. Rogers, though, seems like the best bet to have a spot.

– Boston comes in second even though it’s big addition, Edward Mujica, has the worst projected ERA of its seven relievers. However, Ryan Dempster is still projected as a starter for these purposes and would bring the group down a bit if he starts off in the pen.

– I assume the Yankees will add a veteran reliever prior to Opening Day. Even so, that ranking isn’t going up at all with such a big gap to the White Sox and Angels.

Dodgers – 3.07
Braves – 3.16
Cardinals – 3.19
Giants – 3.24
Reds – 3.29
Diamondbacks – 3.29
Nationals – 3.31
Padres – 3.31
Marlins – 3.38
Pirates – 3.42
Brewers – 3.50
Mets – 3.59
Cubs – 3.59
Phillies – 3.61
Rockies – 3.79

– The Pirates’ ranking here is getting dragged down by Jeanmar Gomez and Vin Mazzaro, who are both projected to throw more innings than the top guys in their pen. They’ll be higher in the subjective rankings.

– The Cardinals are kind of an odd case, given that I have both Joe Kelly and Carlos Martinez projected to open up in the pen but also spend some time in the rotation. The only three pitchers I have on the team in that typical 60-, 70-inning range are Trevor Rosenthal, Kevin Siegrist and Seth Maness. So, the depth is in question. On the other hand, a Jason Motte-Martinez-Rosenthal combo has the potential to be the best in the majors in the late innings, depending on how things shake out.

Here’s my ranking, 1-30, along with the top three ERAs from each team:

1. Royals (Greg Holland, Kelvin Herrera, Luke Hochevar)
2. Athletics (Sean Doolittle, Danny Otero, Ryan Cook)
3. Dodgers (Kenley Jansen, Paco Rodriguez, J.P. Howell)
4. Braves (Craig Kimbrel, Luis Avilan, Jordan Walden)
5. Red Sox (Koji Uehara, Junichi Tazawa, Andrew Miller)
6. Cardinals (Trevor Rosenthal, Randy Choate, Kevin Siegrist)
7. Rays (Jake McGee, Grant Balfour, Joel Peralta)
8. Pirates (Mark Melancon, Jason Grilli, Tony Watson)
9. Diamondbacks (Brad Ziegler, J.J. Putz, David Hernandez)
10. Reds (Aroldis Chapman, Sean Marshall, Sam LeCure)
11. Rangers (Neal Cotts, Tanner Scheppers, Neftali Feliz)
12. Blue Jays (Aaron Loup, Sergio Santos, Casey Janssen)
13. Nationals (Craig Stammen, Tyler Clippard, Rafael Soriano)
14. Giants (Sergio Romo, Javier Lopez, Jean Machi)
15. Tigers (Al Alburquerque, Joe Nathan, Bruce Rondon)
16. Twins (Glen Perkins, Jared Burton, Casey Fein)
17. Padres (Joaquin Benoit, Alex Torres, Nick Vincent)
18. Indians (Cody Allen, Josh Outman, Marc Rzepczynski)
19. Mariners (Charlie Furbush, Yoervis Medina, Fernando Rodney)
20. Marlins (Steve Cishek, Mike Dunn, A.J. Ramos)
21. Rockies (Rex Brothers, Boone Logan, Wilton Lopez)
22. Orioles (Darren O’Day, Brian Matusz, Tommy Hunter)
23. Brewers (Brandon Kintzler, Will Smith, Jim Henderson)
24. Angels (Ernesto Frieri, Joe Smith, Dane De La Rosa)
25. White Sox (Nate Jones, Scott Downs, Daniel Webb)
26. Cubs (Pedro Strop, Wesley Wright, Blake Parker)
27. Mets (Bobby Parnell, Gonzalez Germen, Josh Edgin)
28. Yankees (David Robertson, Preston Claiborne, Shawn Kelley)
29. Phillies (Jake Diekman, Jonathan Papelbon, Antonio Bastardo)
30. Astros (Jesse Crain, Chia-Jen Lo, Josh Fields)

– The Royals are an easy No. 1 in my mind. Not only do they have the elite closer in Greg Holland, but all seven of their relievers have ERAs under 3.40 in my projections. Even if they take away from the group by sticking either Wade Davis or Luke Hochevar back in the rotation, they’d still take the top spot, though that would narrow the gap considerably.

– Even though they seemed to be in pretty good shape anyway, the A’s added $15 million in relievers in the form of Jim Johnson and Luke Gregerson. I still have the incumbents (Sean Doolittle, Ryan Cook and Danny Otero) with the best ERAs of the group.

– The Mariners were set to be ranked 21st before the Fernando Rodney signing.