Tag: Jeremy Horst

Brian Wilson Getty

Phillies one of several teams interested in Brian Wilson


Given the age of the Phillies’ roster, if you asked many of them, “What do you think about Brian Wilson?” you might get a few “I love the Beach Boys!” replies. Brian Wilson the baseball player, however, will be showing off his surgically-repaired right arm in front of several teams, including the Phillies, on Thursday, according to MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki.

Wilson made two appearances with the Giants last season before landing on the disabled list, ultimately requiring Tommy John surgery. He is relatively young at 31 and could be had cheaply with an incentive-laden contract, depending on how many teams consider him a legitimate option for their bullpens.

The Phillies recently received word they will be without relievers Mike Adams and Jeremy Horst for the rest of the season. At 4.36, the Phillies have the National League’s worst bullpen ERA. But, with a 49-50 record and seven games out of first place in the NL East entering tonight’s game against the Cardinals, the Phillies still consider themselves contenders.

Phillies learn Mike Adams and Jeremy Horst are out for the year

mike adams phillies getty

Losing at least two critical members of your bullpen for the final two and a half months of the season has to be disheartening to the Phillies, who consider themselves contenders in the NL East at 48-48, 6.5 games out of first place. The news on Mike Adams and Jeremy Horst comes via the Inquirer’s Matt Gelb:

Mike Adams did not respond to the conservative treatment for numerous tears in his shoulder. He will likely undergo surgery that could sideline him for the beginning of 2014. Adams is owed $7 million next season.

Lefthander Jeremy Horst’s season is likely over. Soreness in his elbow recurred during a rehab stint at triple-A Lehigh Valley. He visited noted orthopedist James Andrews for a second opinion and was injected with a platelet-rich plasma shot. He will not throw for at least six weeks.

Gelb also mentions that right-hander Michael Stutes is still experiencing soreness in his biceps and will be shut down for at least another two weeks.

The Phillies have the worst bullpen ERA in the National League at 4.39. After getting rid of veterans like Chad Durbin and Raul Valdes earlier in the season, the Phillies have been relying on a lot of young, unproven pitchers like Phillippe Aumont and it hasn’t worked out. Their awful ERA has been caused in large part by a league-worst 10.2 percent walk rate and a 19.8 percent strikeout rate, which ranks as the fifth-lowest among all 30 bullpens. Additionally, they have allowed hits on balls put in play at the highest rate in the league at .315.

GM Ruben Amaro said last week he is shopping for a center fielder and at least one reliever, but it doesn’t seem like just one reliever will do the trick.

Phillies give up 13 runs to Royals, but it didn’t have to be this way

Erik Kratz, Chris Getz

I should start by writing about the intentional walk that went bad in the Royals’ rout of the Phillies on Friday.  With the Phillies up 4-2 and one out in the sixth, manager Charlie Manuel decided he’d rather have lefty Jeremy Horst face Alex Gordon with the bases loaded than Kyle Kendrick or a right-handed reliever face pinch-hitter Billy Butler with runners on second and third.

That, I think, is a defensible decision. Gordon is excellent, but not so much against lefties, while Horst limited lefties to a .170 average last season.

Gordon, of course, made it look bad, delivering a triple that put the Royals on top 5-4. Kansas City just kept piling on from there, finally winning the game 13-4.

But rather than focus on Manuel’s intentional walk, I’d rather point towards Ruben Amaro’s bullpen. Because it should be noted that five of the Royals’ runs today came against a pair of 35-year-old journeymen: Chad Durbin and Raul Valdes.

The Phillies finished last season loaded with talented, but unproven, young relievers: Phillippe Aumont, Justin De Fratus, Jake Diekman, Josh Lindblom, Michael Schwimer. All were rather successful in the minors, some had shown flashes in the majors. All were 24-26 years old.

Right now, just one of those pitchers in on the major league roster: Aumont. He worked one scoreless inning in the Opening Day loss to the Braves and hasn’t been seen since. De Fratus and Diekman are in Triple-A. Lindblom was sent to Texas for Michael Young. Schwimer was given away to the Blue Jays because he threatened a grievance over how the Phillies handled an injury last year.

Instead of those intriguing younger arms, the Phillies are going with Durbin and Valdes. And it’s not because they needed the experience late in games. They’re paying through the nose for Jonathan Papelbon and Mike Adams to work the last two innings. It’s because Amaro, when it doubt, much prefers his veterans. Time will tell whether it pays off.

Chipper Jones walks off with bomb off Jonathan Papelbon

Chipper Jones walkoff

Chipper Jones has no intention of going out with a whimper.

Atlanta’s future Hall of Fame third baseman launched a three-run homer off Jonathan Papelbon with two outs in the bottom of the ninth as the Braves edged the Phillies 8-7 on Sunday.

The Braves trailed 7-3 entering the bottom of the ninth before getting two on against Jeremy Horst. Papelbon came on with one out for what looked like a pretty easy save chance, but after striking out Lyle Overbay on a pitch that looked outside, he walked Michael Bourn to load the bases. Martin Prado then hit a chopper down the line that Kevin Frandsen couldn’t decide to how to play. It ended up getting past him for a two-run double, allowing Chipper to come up and end the Braves’ three-game losing streak with a bomb to right center.

It was Chipper’s ninth career walkoff homer. He also had one against the Phillies back on May 2 in an 11-inning game. Before that, he hadn’t had one since 2006. It’s the second time he’s had a walkoff homer with the Braves trailing, as opposed to being a tie game.

Papelbon blew his fourth save in 35 opportunities. He’s given up six homers this year after allowing just three in his final season with Boston.

Jones, who reiterated after the game that he still intends to retire at season’s end, is hitting .302 with 14 homers and 58 RBI.

Michael Schwimer is not happy with the Phillies right now

Michael Schwimer Getty

The Phillies optioned right-handed reliever Michael Schwimer to Triple-A Lehigh Valley today in order to make room for Jeremy Horst’s return from the paternity leave list. That’s hardly headline news. But the story behind the roster move is a bit more interesting.

Here’s the scoop from Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com:

According to multiple sources, the demotion did not sit well with Schwimer. Two sources said the pitcher had recently complained of a sore arm and believed he should have been placed on the disabled list instead of being sent to the minors. Schwimer apparently made his feelings known to club personnel.

It is against Major League Baseball rules to send an injured player to the minors during the season. Of course, the definition of “injured player” can be subjective.

The usually gregarious Schwimer declined to speak with reporters as he strutted out of the clubhouse before batting practice Thursday. One person who had spoken to Schwimer said the pitcher was “making noise about his arm hurting and getting a second opinion.”

Players who are on the disabled list continue to receive major-league pay and service time, so there are motivations at play here that we usually don’t think about in the day-to-day routine of a baseball season. Phillies assistant general manager Scott Proefrock declined to comment on the situation, but if Schwimer continues to insist that he’s injured, it could open the door to a grievance being filed.

Schwimer, 26, has a 4.46 ERA and 36/16 K/BB ratio over 34 1/3 innings with the Phillies this season.