Tag: Jayson Nix

Philadelphia Phillies v Toronto Blue Jays

Orioles sign Jayson Nix


Looking to add some infield depth, the Orioles have signed journeyman Jayson Nix to a minor-league contract with an invitation to spring training.

Nix has spent parts of seven seasons in the majors playing for eight different teams, including the Royals, Pirates, and Phillies last year.

He’s a 32-year-old career .212 hitter with a .627 OPS, but has played every position except center field and catch in the big leagues.

Ned Yost made a terrible double-switch last night

Ned Yost

Most likely, nothing Royals manager Ned Yost did or didn’t do was going to change the outcome of Sunday night’s Game 5. Madison Bumgarner was dominant, and no combination of Royals hitters figured to beat him. Still, in the midst of the game, Yost made his most inexplicable move in weeks: he committed to 25th man Jayson Nix.

It happened in the seventh inning with the Giants up 2-0 and coming to the plate. James Shields was done for the night after six innings, and Kelvin Herrera was taking over. Had the game been taking place in an American League park, nothing here would have raised an eyebrow.

Game 5, though, was played in San Francisco. And the Royals had the pitcher’s spot due up second in the top of the eighth.

Still, this should have been irrelevant. The obvious strategy was to let Herrera, the Royals’ busiest reliever all postseason, pitch the seventh and get lifted for a pinch-hitter. Instead, Yost opted to make the double-switch. He planned for Herrera to pitch two innings, even though Wade Davis and Greg Holland both have undertaken lesser workloads this month and were very much available, having not pitched Saturday.

That was actually the lesser problem with the move, though. The bigger one is that he locked Nix, who was replacing Omar Infante, into batting second the following inning and finishing the game. Nix wasn’t even on the roster for the ALDS or ALCS. He replaced Christian Colon for the World Series because the Royals preferred his defense. Nix had two at-bats all month. He had a total of seven at-bats in September. He’s a poor hitter in the best of times, and these were not the best of times. For the season, he batted .120/.169/.157 in 83 at-bats.

Had Yost simply waited to pinch-hit for the pitcher’s spot, he would have had his pick of Billy Butler, Norichika Aoki or Josh Willingham to hit (Butler actually hit for Jarrod Dyson to lead off the inning. The other two didn’t get at-bats in the game). Instead, he forced himself to go with Nix, since there weren’t any other infielders on the roster to take over.

Nix ended up flying out in his at-bat in the eighth. Herrera pitched a scoreless seventh, then gave up back-to-back singles to start the bottom of the eighth and was pulled. Davis entered and had a rare off night, allowing both inherited runners to score and giving up a run of his own before escaping the frame. The Royals went on to lose 5-0.

So, no, Yost didn’t cost the Royals the game. He hasn’t cost the Royals a game in a long time now, and it’s been pretty difficult to find ways to make fun of him of late. This was an awful choice, though.

Royals add Jayson Nix to the World Series roster

jayson nix ap

Kansas City has made one change to the World Series roster, adding Jayson Nix and subtracting Christian Colon.

Colon is a 24-year-old rookie who debuted in July, whereas Nix is a 31-year-old veteran of seven seasons and eight teams. Nix is a career .212 hitter with a .627 OPS in 466 games as a big leaguer.

Nix will likely fill the same little-used utility man role that Colon did, basically serving as the emergency option at various positions if manager Ned Yost decides to make a whole bunch of late-inning moves.

Eric Hosmer’s emergence, Kelvin Herrera’s return bode well for Royals in ALCS

Eric Hosmer

Eric Hosmer had nine homers and a 93/35 K/BB ratio in 131 games this season. After going deep again in Sunday’s victory, he’s hitting .400 with two homers and a 4/5 K/BB ratio in four postseason games for the ALCS-bound Royals.

And that’s pretty much the best thing that could have happened to Kansas City’s offense, especially considering that Hosmer was going to occupy the cleanup spot whether he hit or not. Manager Ned Yost has used the exact same starting lineup 12 straight games now.

Obviously, Yost is very much a “don’t mess with what’s working” sort of manager, and since his team is winning (10-2 with the set lineup), nothing figures to change in Game 1 of the ALCS against the Orioles, even though it’d probably make sense to sit Billy Butler, use Norichika Aoki as a DH and give Jarrod Dyson a start against a tough righty in Chris Tillman.

Other thoughts on the Royals:

– Kelvin Herrera, who left Thursday’s Game 1 with a forearm problem, seemed just fine in throwing a scoreless inning in Sunday’s Game 3. His presence will be huge with several ALCS games likely to turn into battles of the bullpens. The Royals still have the edge there with Herrera, Wade Davis and Greg Holland set to work the seventh, eighth and ninth innings, but it’s a smaller one against the Orioles than it would be against any other playoff team. Baltimore will counter with Darren O’Day, Andrew Miller and Zach Britton at the end of games.

– With Herrera proving healthy, the Royals might not make any roster changes prior to the ALCS. They have the option of going with lefty Raul Ibanez over righty Josh Willingham as a bat off the bench, which might make sense given the short right field in Camden Yards. However, Willingham actually has better career numbers at the park, for what little it’s worth. Another option would be to go with utilityman Jayson Nix in that spot, but they’d only do that if they were worried about Omar Infante’s shoulder.

– By winning early, the Royals have the ability to set up their ALCS rotation however they’d like. They could even bring Game 3 winner James Shields back for the opener Friday, though they probably won’t. It make more sense to stick with the ALDS alignment, with Jason Vargas in Game 1, Yordano Ventura in Game 2 and Shields in Game 3. That would prevent anyone from having to go too long in between starts, and it’d set up Shields to start a potential Game 7. It’d also clear the way for Ventura, who has the best pure stuff and gives up the fewest homers of the starters, to pitch twice in Camden Yards. Game 4 will probably be Jeremy Guthrie over Danny Duffy, but that can always be decided later.

Rickie Weeks was asked to learn left field and declined

Pittsburgh Pirates v Milwaukee Brewers

Rickie Weeks, the Brewers’ first round pick in the 2003 draft, has not started a game since April 26 and has taken all of 39 plate appearances on the season. The second baseman is owed $11 million, but his declining performance at the plate dating back to 2011, last season’s hamstring injury which cost him about two months, and Scooter Gennett’s comparatively better production have combined to leave Weeks out in the cold.

The Brewers tried to get creative to help Weeks find playing time, but Weeks wasn’t game. Via Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

Weeks will likely become a free agent after the season as his $11.5 million option for 2015 vests only if he accrues 600 plate appearances this season or combines for 1,200 between 2013-14 (he had 399 last season, so this part is irrelevant). Weeks has so much working against him already in terms of leverage in negotiations and the Brewers gave him a great opportunity to make himself a more attractive player. A replacement level second baseman isn’t exactly in demand, but one that can also play the outfield corners in a pinch? That’s how utility guys like Jayson Nix stick around in the big leagues into their mid-30’s.

That’s without mentioning that Weeks should have learned left field simply because the team asked him to do so. However, the Brewers asked rather than demanded, so they can’t be upset that Weeks exercised his free will.