Tag: Jay Bruce

Jay Bruce
AP Photo

Jay Bruce: “I am embarrassed with my season.”


Reds outfielder Jay Bruce hasn’t, by any stretch of the imagination, had a bad season. He has swatted 26 home runs and driven in 84 runs with a .748 OPS while playing above-average defense in the outfield. But they’re not up to the slugger’s usual standard and serve as a milquetoast follow-up to his abysmal 2014.

Bruce called his 2015 season an embarrassment, as Hal McCoy of the Dayton Daily News reports. Bruce elaborated:

“I am embarrassed, I am. I really am,” he said. “There are a lot of different ways to be good and driving in runs is good. But I should have 100 RBI, easily, every year. I should hit 30 home runs, hit 40 doubles and I should hit for a respectable average. And I’m not doing it.”

Bruce is, entering Friday night’s action, seven doubles, four homers, and 16 RBI off his goal with 10 games remaining in the regular season. The 28-year-old is likely being a little too critical of himself, but one would be hard-pressed to find a major leaguer who is 100 percent satisfied with his stats.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

Clayton Kershaw

Dodgers 2, Giants 1: Kershaw: Complete game, one earned run, 15 strikeouts. He also got a hit. That’s 251 Ks on the year for Kershaw and he still has five or even possibly six starts left, barring him being skipped a time or two to get ready for the postseason. And given that the Dodgers just swept the Giants and opened up a six and a half game lead in the West, I’d say the postseason looks pretty certain.

Nationals 4, Cardinals 3: Ryan Zimmermann homered twice and the Nationals managed to hold a slim lead in the late innings for once. Max Scherzer struck out 11 but gave up 11 hits while clinging to a 3-2 lead, forcing him out after six innings. Matt Williams decided that, rather than letting a bad reliever blow the save, he’d just let everyone in a Nats uniform pitch. Matt Grace, the third pitcher of the seventh inning, did the save-blowing honors here. allowing an inherited runner to score to tie things up. Williams used four pitchers in the seventh in all. Zimmermann thankfully tied things up with an eighth inning double and in the eighth and ninth Williams went with Drew Storen and Jonathan Papelbon who did their usual jobs. I shudder to think what Williams might’ve done if he DIDN’T have a lead in the ninth on the road. Maybe have Zimmerman pitch? Could be cool?

Marlins 7, Braves 3: Marlins sweep the Braves, who just lost the last eight games of a nine-game homestand. That’s the longest home losing streak for Atlanta since 1988. Which is wonderful, because the 1988 Braves were the best Braves team ever.

Reds 7, Cubs 4: The Cubs were down by two in the eighth inning when Kris Bryant hit a game-trying home run. Yay! Then, in the ninth, with the score tied, Bryant let a Jay Bruce grounder go through the wickets on what would’ve and should’ve been out number three. That extended the inning and allowed Joey Votto to come to the plate and he promptly hit a three-run homer. Oops! Votto on the season: .316/.457/.567 and 27 homers. He could easily make the list my friends Mike and Bill at the Platoon Advantage did several years ago of The Greatest Individual Seasons on Terrible Teams.

Angels 9, Athletics 4: Albert Pujols had an RBI singe and a two-run homer. The homer was his 35th, giving him 10 35-home run seasons in his first 15 years. Only four guys have done that before. The only other ones: Willie Mays, Mike Schmidt and Alex Rodriguez.

Yankees 13, Red Sox 8: The Yankees scored eight times in the second inning, with homers from Greg Bird, John Ryan Murphy and Carlos Beltran in that inning and added dingers from Stephen Drew and Didi Gregorius later in the game. Bird’s homer came off Henry Owens, a lefty, so maybe all that talk about the need to platoon Bird at first base is overstated. Twenty-one runs in this game and it still lasted “only” three and a half hours. Which is something for a Yankees-Red Sox game. Back in the day a 2-1 game with complete games from both starters would push four hours. Viva La Innings Clock.

Mariners 8, Astros 3: Shawn O’Malley had three hits, including a tiebreaking RBI single in a two-run eighth inning. Not bad for his Mariners debut. A Seattle kid, O’Malley said after the game that “my grandpa and father were huge Mariners fans.” Given that I remember when people still invariably referred to the Mariners as “an expansion team,” I find it hard to get my brain around the idea of anyone’s grandfather being a Mariners fan. Of course I’m an old fart, so whatever.

Rangers 4, Padres 3: Mitch doubled in the go-ahead run in the 10th inning, cutting first-place Houston’s lead in the AL West to two games. Which, holy moly, it’s crazy enough that Houston is the team they’re chasing, but the Rangers getting close is just as amazing given what everyone was thinking back in the spring.

Orioles 7, Rays 6: Two homers from Chris Davis including the walkoff bomb in extras. Watch that second one as it enters the stands.

It’s very nice of Davis to wake up that man sleeping in the center field bleachers, no?

Blue Jays 5, Indians 1: R.A. Dickey went the distance, allowing only one run on four hits. In case you were looking for even more data points about how the Blue Jays have surged, how about R.A. Dickey being  7-0 with a 2.78 ERA in the second half?

Mets 9, Phillies 4: Ruben Tejada hit an inside-the-park home run on a ball when outfielder Domonic Brown flipped over the wall down the right field line trying to field it:


Oops. Yoenis Cespedes and rookie Michael Conforto had homers that didn’t make Phillies fielders look silly.

Royals 12, Tigers 1: Yordano Ventura struck out 11 in seven innings and Royals batters formed conga lines around the bases against Tigers pitching. Not long until the Wolverines, Wings and Lions get started, Michigan people. Yes, even the Lions are worth looking forward to this year.

Brewers 9, Pirates 4: The Brewers have been owning the Pirates lately, notching their fifth straight win against them. Jonathan Lucroy drove in three runs. Lucroy has a ten game hitting streak in which he’s 18 for 40 (.450) with three homers and 14 RBI.

Twins 3, White Sox 0: Tommy Milone tossed seven shutout innings and Miguel Sano hit a long homer. As Aaron drooled yesterday, Sano  is hitting .295/.403/.608 with 14 homers, 13 doubles, 33 walks, 41 RBI and 32 runs through 50 games. Extrapolated to 162 games that works out to 45 homers, 42 doubles, 107 walks, and 133 RBIs. And, as we noted the other day, he’s only 22 friggin years old.


Rockies 9, Diamondbacks 4: Two homers for Carlos Gonzalez, including a grand slam and seven driven in. Nolan Arenado also hit a homer. The two of them are tied for the team lead with 33. They’re also the only two reasons to really watch Rockies games.

The Reds Jason Bourgeois tried to score on an infield fly rule play last night. It didn’t work.

Screen Shot 2015-08-20 at 10.51.42 AM

The low point of a low Reds season happened last night.

In the fifth inning the Reds loaded the bases. Jason Bourgeois was at third base. One out. Jay Bruce was at the plate and popped the ball up on the infield, just to the first base side of the mound. The call: infield fly rule in effect. That means that the batter is out, force plays are not in effect and the fielder doesn’t have to even catch the ball.

So, Royals pitcher Luke Hochevar watched the ball drop in front of him.

And then he watched Bourgeois break from third base. Hochevar thew home, Bourgeois was tagged out for a 1-2 double play and the inning was over:

If Bourgeois simply stays at third, the Reds are still in business. Bourgeois didn’t talk to the media after the game, but Bryan Price said it was an “instinctual” thing. He must’ve been thinking “ball on the ground, bases loaded, I HAVE to go!” Of course, the entire point of the infield fly rule is to avoid such an impetus and to take the gimme double play away from the team on defense.

Your 2015 Reds, folks.

Zack Wheeler called Mets GM Sandy Alderson to express his desire to stay with the team

Zack Wheeler Getty

We’ve understandably heard a lot about Wilmer Flores since the failed Carlos Gomez trade on Wednesday, but right-hander Zack Wheeler was the other player who was supposed to be sent to the Brewers. His name was surfacing in rumors again yesterday, most notably as part of a proposed deal for Reds outfielder Jay Bruce, but Mike Vorkunov of the Newark Star-Ledger reports that Wheeler reached out to Mets general manager Sandy Alderson to express his desire to stay with the team.

While the Mets managed to keep Wheeler while also picking up Tigers slugger Yoenis Cespedes, Alderson said that the phone call didn’t sway the team’s trade talks. However, he appreciated Wheeler reaching out to him.

“(It) actually had quite an impact,” Alderson said. “Really expressed his desire to remain a Mets, his excitement for being part of the organization and being part of what is happening here. Acknowledged it was a business but at the same time wanted to express his feelings to me. I can’t say it was dispositive of what took place because I acknowledged back to him yes it’s a business.

“Again, if you go back to Wednesday and even this conversation, we’re talking about human beings. We all develop an attachment to each other and whatever capacity we serve so it’s hard. Anyway, I appreciated the fact Zack reached out.”

Of course, Alderson acquired Wheeler for Carlos Beltran in a deadline deal with the Giants back in 2011.

Wheeler, 25, underwent Tommy John surgery and flexor pronator surgery in March. He resumed throwing this week, but isn’t expected to pitch in the majors again until around midseason next year.

The Winners and Losers at the Trade Deadline

Cole Hamels

On some level it’s silly to declare winners and losers a mere hour after the trade deadline passes. For the buyers these trades, in the shortest term, are designed to help them get over the top and into the playoffs, so we can’t know until October if they were successful. For the seller it could be years before we know if the prospects they received in return truly paid off.

But this is the Internet, and things like “reason” and “waiting” are just not concepts that can be abided. And, at the very least, we can certainly talk about who, in our gut anyway, did OK this trading season. So let’s go with our gut for moment, shall we?

First, go check out our entire rundown of every deal of consequence at the deadline over at our Trade Deadline Tracker.source: Getty Images


Astros: Carlos Gomez helps fix their thin outfield, Scott Kazmir gives them another ace behind Dallas Keuchel and Mike Fiers helps solidify the back end of the rotation. And they got this haul despite not parting with any truly top prospects such as Vincent Velasquez, Mark Appel and Michael Feliz. A great upgrade in a go-for-it season without sacrificing any of that bright future? You gotta love it.

Royals: Ben Zobrist and Johnny Cueto are excellent win-now pickups, and the Royals are certainly winning now. Kansas City paid a pretty steep price for the Cueto rental — Brandon Finnegan, John Lamb and Cody Reed could all be a part of the Reds’ rotation over the next couple of years — but this is the Royals day and they are seizing it.

Tigers: It’s been a bad summer for Detroit and, at least as far as the public was concerned, they weren’t selling until about 48 hours ago. But in that 48 hours they got a lot of something out of what would’ve been nothing after this lost season. David Price was not going to sign with the Tigers after this year and, at most, they’d get a first round pick for him if they held on. Instead they got three nice arms in Daniel Norris, Matt Boyd and Jairo Labourt. Like the Cincy trio, all of these guys will figure in the Tigers’ major league future. They wouldn’t have even gotten a draft pick for Yoenis Cespedes, so getting a couple of arms for him — including a nice one in Double-A pitcher Michael Fulmer — was a decent return. Detroit sure didn’t want to sell, but if they had to, they did well.

Reds: For the reasons mentioned in the Royals comment, they got the most out of their big asset, Cueto. Their overall management of this roster has not been exemplary, but they made a good trade there. And, more importantly, they didn’t panic and move Jay Bruce and Todd Frazier just to say they moved them, which I feel would’ve been a mistake. They are both valuable bats at a time when bats are scarce. They can either try to move them through waivers in August or, more realistically, in the offseason when everyone is less panicky and it’s easier to see how to fit a position player into your plans than it is on the fly in July.

Blue Jays: This could be a situation in which, a couple of years from now, when they’re paying a declining Troy Tulowitzki and David Price has long since gone, they will regret these deals. But for now you have to credit them for going big rather than going home. They have a lot of ground to make up and they gave up a lot of talent to do it, but if these moves turn into an October run it will have been worth it. That’s what a lot of people who judge trades often forget when, ten years later, they ignore the veterans and only talk about the kids involved who turned into something. The Tigers traded John Smoltz for Doyle Alexander. Know what? They were right to do it given their situation in the summer of 1987 and don’t let anyone tell you different, even if it stings Tigers fans a bit to think about what life with Smoltz would’ve looked like.

Phillies: Ruben Amaro has gotten a load of crap over the years. And heck, maybe he didn’t make these moves. Maybe Pat Gillick or Andy MacPhail did. I don’t know. But whoever it was who called these shots, they got a decent return for Cole Hamels in the form of Jorge Alfaro, Jake Thompson, Nick Williams, Alec Asher, Jerad Eickhoff and Matt Harrison and a couple of nice relief prospects for Ben Revere. They also unloaded Jonathan Papelbon and the specter of his 2016 option. Maybe they should’ve rebuilt years ago, but they did the best with what they had now.

UPDATE:  OK, I’ll include the Mets here in their pickup of Cespedes. It certainly improved the offense. I’m not sure it’s enough — it’s still a pretty bad offense — but credit where it is due for addressing a problem.



No one really got hosed here, but the following teams didn’t make the sort of bold moves one would have assumed they would.

Marlins: OK, they’re true losers. Sorry, hard to sugarcoat this. They traded away guys who made money and who likely appeared on season ticket brochures in Mat Latos and Dan Haren. None of the prospects they got back seem projectable and all of their deals seemed aimed at salary relief. Which is par for the course for them.

Yankees: They didn’t have a lot to work with, but they definitely needed a starter or, short of that, another reliever to help that strong bullpen get stronger and diminish the impact of that problematic starting five. And . . . they did nothing. While Toronto picked up two huge pieces and even the Orioles added talent. They have a nice division lead and my bet now is that it holds up, but it was rather surprising not seeing the Yankees making any moves.

Dodgers: Picking up Mat Latos and Alex Wood help their depleted rotation, and Jose Peraza is a nice long-term piece for the Dodgers at second base, but given their money and their prospects, I’m rather shocked they weren’t in on the Price/Cueto/Hamels action. Some of their fans likely will be too. Certainly not hard losers — they improved their team –but they sort of surprised in their lack of big moves.

Braves: I’m somewhat torn here, because if you look at the Braves’ overall plan since they decided to blow things up last offseason, a lot of what they did makes sense and fits in a larger “smart moves” narrative. Including Bronson Arroyo in the deal that brought them Hector Olivera ended up — if you rationalize things just right — getting them Olivera and pitching prospect Touki Touissant for basically free, and that’s good. But you can also say that they traded a well-thought-of, team-controlled lefty starter and one of their top position playing prospects for a 30-year-old infielder who has never played in the bigs and who has an injury history. Which, eh.

Cardinals: They’re leading their division and seem like a team in good shape, but like a lot of clubs, just wanted one more bat. And they got it in Brandon Moss. So, good, right? Welp, I dunno. They gave up a nice pitching prospect in Rob Kaminsky to do it. You’d figure he could get you more. Maybe Ben Zobrist if they had moved aggressively? Hard to say, but it’s a lot for Moss, who has had a rotten year.

Cubs: A big caveat here in that, in their heart of hearts, I bet Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer didn’t think they’d contend this year and thus don’t really feel comfortable trading a lot of talent for a 2015 run. If I were them I’d have a hard time doing that, that’s for sure. I’d be all about getting David Price next winter, frankly. Still, if they were going t0 make a move to make it look like they were making a move, I’m not sure why Dan Haren was that move. He has been OK overall, but he has pitched WAY WAY worse on the road than he has in Marlins Park and will likely give up a ton of homers in Wrigley Field. Indeed, I feel like his second half will be rather ugly.

OK, so that exercise is done. And, as noted above, maybe it was silly given that time is required to truly judge these moves. But this is the Internet, dang it, and the Internet is made for this kind of insta-analysis, right?