Tag: Jason Vargas

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Jason Vargas returns to disabled list with left flexor strain


The Royals just announced that left-hander Jason Vargas is headed back to the disabled list due to a recurrence of a left flexor strain.

Vargas struggled with a 5.26 ERA over his first five starts prior to his first stint on the disabled list in early May. He missed three weeks and posted a 2.25 ERA with an 11/1 K/BB ratio in 16 innings over three starts since returning, but apparently he’s still not feeling right.

Vargas was scheduled to start Sunday against the Cardinals, but Andy McCullough of the Kansas City Star writes that Chris Young will move up a day to take his place. Meanwhile, Edinson Volquez will start Monday’s series opener against the Brewers before Joe Blanton will enter the rotation to start Tuesday. It’s worth noting that Yordano Ventura left last night’s start with irritation in his ulnar nerve, but Yost told McCullough that they don’t believe he’ll have to miss a start.

The Royals called up left-hander Brandon Finnegan to take Vargas’ spot on the active roster.

Royals shut down Danny Duffy with shoulder injury

Danny Duffy
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Initially the Royals planned to merely push back Danny Duffy’s next start a few days because of shoulder soreness, but as so often happens in cases like this the left-hander is now headed to the disabled list with inflammation.

Left-hander Jason Vargas, who’s coming back from a disabled list stint of his own for an elbow injury, will start in Duffy’s place and the Royals have also called up left-hander Brandon Finnegan from the minors.

Duffy’s history of arm problems likely played a part in the Royals ultimately deciding to use some extra caution. He’s also struggled of late after getting off to a good start this season, allowing 14 runs in 10 innings this month while walking more batters (10) than he struck out (7).

Royals place Jason Vargas on disabled list with elbow injury

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Royals left-hander Jason Vargas is headed to the disabled list with a strained flexor tendon.

Vargas was off to a rough start this season, posting a 5.26 ERA through five outings, but he tossed six innings of two-run ball against the Indians on Wednesday. And now the Royals will hold their breath waiting to see if the injury leads to Tommy John elbow surgery in the second season of a four-year, $32 million deal.

Journeyman right-hander Yohan Pino takes Vargas’ spot on the roster, Chris Young figures to take his spot in the rotation, and Kansas City will likely be relying on its fantastic bullpen even more than before.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Carlos Perez

Angels 5, Mariners 4: Have yourself a major league debut, Carlos Perez:


The 24-year-old catcher singled in his big league debut and then led off the ninth with this shot to win it for the Angels. He’s the first player to hit a walkoff homer in his debut since Miguel Cabrera did it in 2003. Not bad company.

Marlins 2, Nationals 1: Mat Latos and four relievers combined on a three-hitter. Stephen Strasburg left the game early for Washington with a pinch in his shoulder blades which his manager said has been bugging him lately. Matt Williams said after the game that “we’ll have to have the chiropractor look at him.” After that I suppose they’ll give him a Balsam Specific, some Smeckler’s Powder and, while they’re burning money, a Curative Galvanic Belt too. All of which is way better than what they did back when Williams himself played and guys were bled by leeches to be have him rid of all of their bad humours.

Red Sox 2, Rays 0: The Red Sox had only five hits, but two of them were Mookie Betts homers. Given that Rick Porcello tossed eight shutout innings, that was plenty. Check out the 1975 throwbacks the Sox wore:


They don’t look that great on Betts because he is neither (a) fat; nor (b) wearing a pullover that is a size too small, which was the style in the mid-70s. Plus, I seriously doubt he has big, blown-dry hair under that cap and almost certainly doesn’t smoke. Meanwhile, some guy whose heyday was 1975 is complaining about how today’s athletes can’t compare to the guys 40 years ago.

Braves 9, Phillies 0: Shelby Miller needed only 99 pitches to shut out the Phillies. Like, a real honest-to-goodness nine-inning shutout like the pitchers used to throw 40 years ago back when the athletes were way better than today. Miller, by the way, is 4-1 with a 1.66 and a 31/14 K/BB ratio in 38 innings. I still hated to see Jason Heyward go, but Miller has been a good pickup and by far the most reliable Braves pitcher this year.

Dodgers 8, Brewers 2: Zack Greinke allowed only an unearned run while pitching into the eighth, striking out seven. He also hit a double and flipped is bat like he was Yasiel Puig or something:


All of your “but the NL has better strategy!” arguments will never sway me, but pitchers flipping their bats and strutting around like they own the place after they get hits might.


Reds 7, Pirates 1: Marlon Byrd homered and drove in four. His RBI double put the Reds up by six runs, which led to some serious profundity from manager Bryan Price, who said “it’s a lot easier to manage a game with a six-run lead than a one-run lead or being down a run.” Really makes you think, man.

Yankees 6, Blue Jays 3: Eight shutout innings for Michael Pineda before the bullpen, uncharacteristically, allowed some late damage. Mark Teixeira hit a two run homer and A-Rod doubled in a run. Which, again, is the Yankees’ recipe for success this year: Pineda stepping up and the old guys not looking so old.

Mets 3, Orioles 2: Bartolo Colon became the first pitcher to beat the same opponent while playing for seven different teams. He didn’t get the chance to do it in his half season in Montreal, but you figure he would’ve beaten them there too. And while, yes, Greinke’s double and bat flip — plus Doug Fister getting a pinch-hit single in the Nats game — may bolster the NL rules argument, this still happened last night:


White Sox 5, Tigers 2: Jeff Samardzija allowed only two runs in seven innings, bouncing back from that bad start in an empty Camden Yards. The Chisox’ throwbacks looked better than the Red Sox’ by the way, because these throwbacks are always amazing:


Royals 5, Indians 3: More like Eric Homer, amirite? God, I’m sorry I even said that. That’s bad. But you know damn well someone has called him that at some point. Anyway, Hosmer had a three-run shot. Jason Vargas was touched by a Michael Brantley homer but otherwise cruised for six innings.

Athletics 2, Twins 1: Another strong starting pitching performance on a night with many, this one from Jesse Chavez who allowed only an unearned run in seven and a third. Billys Butler and Burns provided offense, with the former notching two hits and an RBI and the latter adding two hits and a stolen base.

Rangers 7, Astros 1: Probably the least-apt “against his old mates” game ever, as the Astros with Wandy Rodriguez back in 2012 may have been a team of Martians or Daleks or mole people or something compared to the roster they have now. Hell, you can’t even say he pitched against his old laundry, as the uniforms are all different too. Either way, Rodriguez allowed only one run over eight innings against his old club. At least assuming they didn’t reorganize and become some weird LLC or holding company or something since he left.

Cardinals 7, Cubs 4: Matt Carpenter hit a three-run homer and drove in four overall as the Cards win their eighth in a row. Mitch Harris, a 29-year-old rookie and former Navy lieutenant got his first career win. The post-game pie in the face or beer shower doesn’t really compare to shellback initiations, I assume.

Giants 6, Padres 0: Ryan Vogelsong tossed seven innings of three-hit ball and the Giants won their fifth in a row. Third straight by shutout. That’s 20-straight scoreless innings for the Padres, who actually have a bit of lumber at their disposal.

Diamondbacks vs. Rockies: POSTPONED: Rain, feel it on my finger tips
Hear it on my window pane
Your love’s coming down like
Rain, wash away my sorrow
Take away my pain
Your love’s coming down like rain

Yeah, that’s Madonna. Wanna fight about it? Madonna is awesome.

And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

John Lackey

Cardinals 4, Brewers 0: John Lackey was fantastic, tossing seven scoreless innings, allowing five hits and striking out eight. He’s also making $500K this year because of that farkakte contract he signed with the Red Sox way back when. St. Louis’ gain, I suppose. And if Lackey keeps pitching like this, his gain this coming offseason when he signs a new deal.

Twins 8, Royals 5: Kennys Vargas was better than Jason Vargas on this day. They’re not related but I sort of wish they were so that we could invent some crazy family backstory here, but alas. Anyway, Kennys and Kurt Suzuki each hit two-run homers as the Twins win again.

Nationals 5, Phillies 2: The Phillies can shuffle their lineup all they want — Howard batting seventh, Frenchy cleaning up — and it’s not going to matter much given that they don’t have any hitters who can do a dang thing against decent pitching this year. And here Doug Fister was more than decent, allowing two runs — only one of them earned — while pitching into the seventh. Cole Hamels have up five runs in six innings, but really, he and all other Phillies pitchers are going to have to be close to perfect this year.

Rays 4, Blue Jays 2: Chris Archer struck out 11 and allowed only two hits in seven shutout innings. Steven Souza did not hit a monstrous, 450-foot or so home run last night. I wonder what’s wrong with him?

Mets 7, Marlins 5: New York spotted the Marlins three runs — one of them on Giancarlo Stanton’s first dinger of the year —  but no worries. Lucas Duda had three hits. Wilmer Flores had a three-run shot. There was a replay challenge that lasted six minutes, so that was fun, but after the game Travis d’Arnaud admitted that the replay officials got it right.

Diamondbacks 7,  Giants 6: Aaron Hill hit a two-run double with two outs in the 12th to put the Snakes ahead. The Giants have lost seven straight.