Tag: Jason Kipnis

CLEVELAND, OH -  JULY 28: Jason Kipnis #22 of the Cleveland Indians reacts after lining out to right to end the second inning against the Kansas City Royals at Progressive Field on July 28, 2015 in Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)

Indians place Jason Kipnis on disabled list with right shoulder inflammation

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After sitting out Sunday’s game, Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis was placed on the disabled list today due to right shoulder inflammation.

According to Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Kipnis has been dealing with the injury off and on for most of the year and it bothers him the most when he throws. He served as the designated hitter on Saturday, but will now get some extended rest. The expectation is that he’ll miss two to three weeks.

Kipnis cooled down a bit in July, but he’s still having a heck of a year, batting .326/.401/.477 with six home runs, 39 RBI, and 11 stolen bases over 101 games. Serving as the Indians’ leadoff man, he’s tied for eighth in the American League with 66 runs scored.

HBT First-Half Awards: American League MVP

Mike Trout

With no baseball on Wednesday or Thursday, we’re taking stock of the best performances of the first half of the season by handing out midseason awards. Maybe someday we’ll have the budget for an actual Midseason Award Trophy, but for now they merely get our kind and admiring words. Next up: American League MVP.

Aaron Gleeman‘s ballot:

1. Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels
2. Manny Machado, Baltimore Orioles
3. Josh Donaldson, Toronto Blue Jays

Angels center fielder Mike Trout is the reigning MVP and, in my opinion, also should have won the award in 2012 and 2013. He’s having perhaps his best season yet, leading the league in homers, slugging percentage, and runs scored–and OPS, among players not on the disabled list–while playing an up-the-middle position defensively and playing it well. It just doesn’t get any better in terms of all-around value. We’re seeing something truly special in Trout, who may end this season as the most valuable player in the history of baseball through age 23.

Manny Machado of the Orioles and Josh Donaldson of the Blue Jays are much different players stylistically, but they’re both providing very good offense and elite defense at third base. They narrowly beat out Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis and injured Tigers slugger Miguel Cabrera to round out my top three, with a little nod to the handful of starting pitchers who also warranted strong consideration for their great first halves.

Craig Calcaterra‘s ballot:

1. Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels
2. Jason Kipnis, Cleveland Indians
3. Manny Machado, Baltimore Orioles

It’s Mike Trout’s world and we’re all just living in it. He’s probably going to win the MVP award again and, like Aaron said, it should probably be his fourth. And contrary to the bizarre anti-Trout narrative so many people feel obligated to perpetuate, saying Trout is the best player in the game does not require one to know the first thing about advanced metrics. He’s leading the league in homers and runs. He’s slugging better than anyone. He has scored more runs and has more total bases than anyone. He plays eye-popping center field. His skills and numbers are such that they would be every bit as understood by an awards voter in 1935 as they are in 2015, and to suggest otherwise makes you sound silly.

Beyond him things get fun. Miguel Cabrera is an all-offense candidate, but a really good one. His calf injury will take him out of the actual MVP conversation — and he doesn’t make my top three here — but one must nonetheless tip their cap to how dang good he was in the first half.

But when it comes to actually casting a ballot, I am an all-around-player partisan, and Jason Kipnis’ all-around game has been second best to only Trout’s this year in the AL in my view. After a sort of slow start he has been astounding at the plate this year while playing a nifty second base while rapping doubles off the wall, walking a heck of a lot for guy with only six homers and playing every dang day. As I wrote yesterday, the Indians aren’t dead yet and have a chance to make some noise in the second half. The fact that they’re not totally dead yet with everything else that has gone wrong has an awful lot to do with Kipnis.

Manny Machado and Josh Donaldson are also having fantastic seasons, of course. But we decided to only go top three, so there we are.

Looking ahead to the second half: The Indians are a good bet to improve

Francisco Lindor

The top of the AL Central is not terribly surprising. There the Royals sit with the biggest lead of any of the division leaders, four and a half games over the Minnesota Twins. Many people, of course, figured that the Twins wouldn’t be anyplace close to the top of the division and many suspect that they’ll falter as the second half wears on.

I can’t say I agree with that completely as the Twins have a lot of young talent and young talent has a way of not adhering to the expectations, both good and bad, people have for it. They’re not aware they’re supposed to falter, so maybe they won’t?

However the Twins shake out, it’s safe to say that no one expected the Indians to be in last place. Indeed, with their excellent rotation and big bats in Jason Kipnis, Michael Brantley, Carlos Santana, Yan Gomes and Lonnie Chisenhall, they were thought to be a favorite to win the Central or, at the very least, give the Tigers and Royals a run for their money.

Except of that group, only Kipnis has been a big bat this year, getting a lot of help from David Murphy. Brantley has been OK, but far less of a threat than last year. Gomes and Chisenhall have fallen into the abyss, in part due to injuries. Carlos Santana has struggled mightily. While the rotation has continued to pitch well —-Corey Kluber, Danny Salazar, Carlos Carrasco, and Trevor Bauer all notched 100+ strikeouts in the first half — the Indians defense has been about the worst in the game, betraying its pitchers over and over again. That’s how a promising team winds up 11 games back and tied for last place.

But that really doesn’t seem sustainable for me. For one thing, the teams above Cleveland look to falter. Perhaps the Royals won’t collapse — there’s far too much talent there — but the Tigers are already in something of a freefall and will be without Miguel Cabrera for weeks. Those Twins, again, have overachieved and could very well slip. The team with which Cleveland is tied for last place, the Chicago White Sox, has been rumored to be in sell mode at the trade deadline and could be punting 2015, creating an opening for the Tribe.

More fundamentally, however, the Indians have to get better because they can’t be worse.

There has apparently been nothing wrong physically with Carlos Santana. He’s a streaky hitter and always has been, and in the final two series before the All-Star break, went 9-for-23 (.391) with a double, triple, home run and four RBIs over seven games. If he carries that momentum into the the second half, the Indians will have another weapon on offense.

The biggest challenge will be to right the ship defensively. And even a little ship-righting will be huge, because the Indians pitchers are just dandy at run prevention. Fortunately for Cleveland, that process has already begun.

Shortstop Francisco Lindor and third baseman Giovanny Urshela were called up in June and, while they haven’t done much at the plate, they have totally revamped the left side of the Indians’ previously porous infield. Both have been dynamite with the glove and have drastically improved the Indians’ defensive efficiency in their short time. Perhaps that’s an anomaly and perhaps, with more time in the game, they’ll come back down to earth a bit. But both have good defensive pedigrees and couldn’t possibly be worse than what came before. Also, one or both of them could start hitting a little too to help even things out.

All of which brings us back to where we were before. The Indians are a wildly talented team with a great rotation and a couple of big stars on offense. On paper, it’s a team that should challenge for a playoff spot. Given the weakness of the non-Royals members of this division, they still may very well be able to in the second half, an 11-game deficit notwithstanding.