Tag: Jacoby Ellsbury

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Jacoby Ellsbury diagnosed with abdominal strain


From WFAN’s Sweeny Murti comes word that Yankees center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury has been diagnosed with a lower abdominal strain and will be held out of Grapefruit League action for at least the next two days.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi described the strain as “mild, mild, mild,” so this isn’t something that should affect Ellsbury’s readiness for the beginning of the regular season. The Yankees’ opener is Monday, April 6 against the Blue Jays — a little under three weeks away.

Ellsbury, 31, batted .271/.328/.419 with 16 home runs and 39 stolen bases in 149 games last season for New York. It was the first year of a seven-year, $153 million contract.

What to watch for at the 2014 Winter Meetings

Grand Hyatt

SAN DIEGO — Greetings from beautiful southern California. Where the weather is gorgeous and the speculation about free agents and trade possibilities is endless. It’s the Winter Meetings, baseball’s annual transaction frenzy, where owners, GMs, agents and everyone else in and around the game assemble and make the moves which set the groundwork for the coming year. This year the work is being done at the Manchester Grand Hyatt In San Diego, and it is from here I will be writing all week to keep you in the loop.

This year’s Winter Meetings are shaping up to be very different from last year’s when, it seemed anyway, all of the big deals happened before the Winter Meetings got underway. Robinson Cano signed with Seattle in the runup to it all. As did  Carlos Beltran, Joe Nathan, Jacoby Ellsbury, Jarrod Saltalamacchia, A.J. Pierzynski, Paul Konerko, Justin Morneau, Scott Kazmir and Ryan Vogelsong. Indeed, it seemed like most of the big names were off the board before everyone even made it to Orlando in 2013. But this year it is a different story indeed, with all manner of players still available.

On the market:


We still await Jon Lester’s decision. He, reportedly, has offers in hand from the Cubs and Red Sox and possibly the Dodgers and Giants. The deal he ultimately accepts could be around $150 million, but for now, he is leaving everyone guessing and the rest of the pitching market is likely waiting for him to make a choice before it all falls into line. Once he does, expect the market for Max Scherzer to heat up as well as the trade market for any number of other starting pitchers, any of whom could go to teams which fell short of Lester. Included in this group could be Jordan Zimmermann and Doug Fister, Rick Porcello, Jeff Samardzija and any of the Reds’ many pitchers reportedly on the market.


Yoenis Cespedes, Justin Upton and Matt Kemp are the big bats on the block. If the Dodgers can’t move Kemp they may try to trade Andre Ethier and/or Carl Crawford. Jay Bruce of the Reds and free agent Melky Cabrera each own some big bats which are also in demand, the former via trade and the latter via free agency.


David Robertson is the biggest name reliever left, though his market is hard to define. The Yankees may welcome him back, but probably not at the salary he’s expecting given that they signed Andrew Miller already. The Astros — who actually outbid the Yankees for Miller, only to see him choose New York — are a possibility. Other free agent relievers include Sergio Romo, Pat Neshek, Joba Chamberlain, Rafael Soriano and Francisco Rodriguez. Jonathan Papelbon is being shopped by the Phillies and, given their rebuild, the Braves could dangle Craig Kimbrel as well.


Beyond the free agents, trade targets and rumor news, there is some other business to be attended to at the Winter Meetings. Most notably today, when the Veterans Committee announces which of the Golden Age candidates it has voted into the Hall of Fame. The candidates: Dick Allen, Ken Boyer, Gil Hodges, Bob Howsam, Jim Kaat, Minnie Minoso, Tony Oliva, Billy Pierce, Luis Tiant and Maury Wills. If I had to guess I’d say that Howsam — the executive who built the Cincinnati Reds of the 1970s — Hodges and Oliva get voted in, but really it’s anyone’s guess. Dick Allen and Minnie Minoso are certainly deserving of a plaque in Cooperstown, but whether they get there or not is an open question.

But really, we can preview until the cows come home but every year there are some surprises at the Winter Meetings. Follow us at HardballTalk all week to keep abreast of what is going on at baseball’s biggest offseason event.

Thought experiment: How many MLB teams would wipe the slate clean?

CC Sabathia AP

Baseball news is slowing down for Thanksgiving and for some reason this idea randomly popped into my head while on Twitter, so I figured I’d ask it here: How many MLB teams, if given the option, would say yes to being taken off the hook for all guaranteed contracts currently on their books?

In other words, all or nothing. Wipe the slate clean. Every player signed for guaranteed money is no longer on your team and you’re no longer responsible for their contract. You get to keep all players not signed to specific, non-minimum salaried contracts, which means pre-arbitration eligible players basically.

For instance, my beloved Twins would wipe six players off their books: Joe Mauer, Ricky Nolasco, Phil Hughes, Glen Perkins, Kurt Suzuki, and Mike Pelfrey. Hughes would hurt a lot, since he was great in 2014 and is reasonably priced, but Mauer, Nolasco, and Pelfrey would be easy calls to jettison. Overall the Twins would probably be better off with a clean slate.

Another example is the Yankees, who’d be wiping these players off their books: Mark Teixeira, CC Sabathia, Alex Rodriguez, Masahiro Tanaka, Jacoby Ellsbury, Brian McCann, Carlos Beltran, Brett Gardner, Martin Prado, Brendan Ryan, Chris Young. Obviously some of those would hurt, but as a whole the Yankees would seemingly jump at that chance to wipe the slate clean.

Which other teams would do the same?

Chris Young can earn up to $6.325 million with incentives

Chris Young Getty

On Saturday night, the Yankees agreed to a one-year, $2.5 million deal with outfielder Chris Young. Today, Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY adds that Young can earn up to $6.325 million in incentives included with his contract.

Young, who posted an .876 OPS in the month of September after joining the Yankees, will serve as the club’s fourth outfielder behind Jacoby Ellsbury, Brett Gardner, and Carlos Beltran. Each in the trio has battled the injury bug, so it’s not inconceivable to think Young may eventually find his way into the lineup on a regular basis at some point during the 2015 season.

Yankees sign Chris Young to a one-year, $2.5 million deal

Chris Young Getty

WFAN’s Sweeny Murti reports that the Yankees and outfielder Chris Young have reached an agreement on a deal pending a physical. It was reported earlier that the two sides had mutual interest, so they hammered out a deal in a matter of hours. Exact details of the contract have not yet surfaced. [Update: It’s a one-year deal worth $2.5 million with incentives, ESPN’s Buster Olney reports.]

Young, 31, struggled for most of the season with the Mets — batting .205/.283/.346 with eight home runs and 28 RBI in 287 plate appearances — before ultimately being released in mid-August. The Yankees snapped him up and were rewarded when he bounced back to hit .282/.354/.521 with three home runs and 10 RBI in 79 plate appearances in the month of September.

Young will serve as the club’s fourth outfielder, behind Jacoby Ellsbury, Brett Gardner, and Carlos Beltran.