Tag: Jacob deGrom

Kris Bryant

And That Happened: Monday’s Scores and Highlights


Cubs 2, Indians 1: Jon Lester was close to a complete game shutout but Carlos Santana had different ideas when he hit an RBI double in the ninth. No worries, though, because the Cubs are covered in pixie dust this year and Kris Bryant used it to hit a walkoff homer to give the Cubs their 20th win in their last 24 games. The Cubs would lead four of the six divisions in baseball this year. They’re in third place in the NL Central.

Yankees 1, Astros 0: Another walkoff, though a tad lest dramatic given that it was a sac fly. Not that this wasn’t an exciting game given that you had two pitchers — Nate Eovaldi and Scott Feldman — tossing eight shutout innings against each other. This could easily be an ALDS matchup. If so, and something like this happened in October, such a game would be an instant classic.

Mets 16, Phillies 7: Welcome back David Wright! Wright homered in his return from over four months on the disabled list. Not that he was alone here: Mets batters had 15 extra-base hits including eight home runs. Lost in this is Jacob deGrom giving up seven runs on eight hits and failing to escape the third inning, but I feel like that’s OK on a night like this.

Braves 5, Rockies 3: Yesterday, after I wrote that thing about team chemistry, I made some jokes on Twitter about how if chemistry matters so much why isn’t Team Leader and Super Chemistry Guy Jonny Gomes leading the Braves to victory after victory. Overall he isn’t, of course, but in this one he did, driving in three including a three-run homer. The Braves snap a seven-game losing streak. Maybe Gomes was the spark for that here, but I suppose playing the team that now has the worst record in baseball will do that for you too.

Reds 12, Tigers 5: This was a makeup game from an earlier rainout. The Tigers probably wish it had rained again. At least heading into the bottom of the sixth. At that time they had a 5-0 lead and things were just dandy. That’s when Buck Farmer ran out of gas and allowed three runs and was followed up by a bullpen which allowed seven more before the inning was over. Brandon Phillips drove in four runs with a home run and a triple in that inning as the Reds snap their nine-game losing streak. Joey Votto hit a two-run homer in the eighth to cap things off, but I assume his many critics in Cincinnati will say that was just garbage time, stat-padding work, not actually good baseball.

Pirates 5, Marlins 2: A couple of plunkings and a high inside from Marlins relievers which seemed more a function of incompetence than intent, though it did lead to one ejection. Both the plunkees ended up scoring too. Meanwhile J.A. Happ threw six scoreless innings as one of the best teams in baseball beat one of the worst.

Red Sox 5, White Sox 4: Sox win. Rusney Castillo was 3-for-4, homered and drove in all five of the Red Sox’ runs.

Royals 8, Orioles 3: Kris Medlen made his first start in almost two years and got the win, thanks to the Royals putting up a seven-spot after he left the game but while he was still the pitcher of record. Omar Infante tripled in two runs in that inning and scored on the same play thanks to a throwing error. The day before he was out trying to stretch a triple into an inside-the-park homer. In one day he has learned jiu-jitsu and the art of making your opponent beat himself.

Cardinals 5, Diamondbacks 3: Lance Lynn pitched in trouble all night but his defense bailed him out with four double plays, including one with Paul Goldschmidt at the plate with one out and the bases loaded. Overall Arizona stranded 11 runners.

Athletics 11, Mariners 5: Another club with a big inning, this time the A’s with a seven-run fifth. Oakland was down 5-0 at the time but a Danny Valencia homer and two Stephen Vogt doubles helped them claw back.

Mets set franchise record with eight home runs in blowout win over Phillies

New York Mets' Juan Lagares, left, fist bumps New York Mets' Daniel Murphy, right, after hitting a home run in the third inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Laurence Kesterson)

The Mets celebrated David Wright’s return from the disabled list Monday by setting franchise records with 15 extra-base hits and eight home runs as part of a blowout 16-7 win over the Phillies at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia. By the way, Wright got the fireworks started by homering in his first at-bat since April 14.

Lost in all of this is that Jacob deGrom had his worst start in the majors, lasting just 2 2/3 innings. The Mets trailed 7-2 after the third inning. However, deGrom picked a good time for an off night, as his offense bailed him out with 14 unanswered runs. Meanwhile, Sean Gilmartin tossed 3 1/3 scoreless innings of relief to hold the Phillies in check and save the bullpen.

Wilmer Flores hit two home runs, including a go-ahead three-run shot in the fifth inning. Juan Lagares, Travis d’Arnaud, Michael Cuddyer, Daniel Murphy, and Yoenis Cespedes also went deep. The Phillies hit three home runs of their own, so the two teams combined for 11 home runs, which ties a National League record. It has happened five times, most recently on May 17, 1979 between the Phillies and Cubs.

The Mets are riding high right now. Including their three-game sweep of the Rockies over the weekend, they have scored 49 runs over their last four games. More importantly, they are now a season-high 12 games over .500 at 68-56 and a season-high 5 1/2 games ahead of the Nationals in the National League East.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Alex Rodriguez

source: AP

Yankees 8, Twins 4: Six months ago the Yankees’ view of Alex Rodriguez was “Who?” And if he so much as farted off-key, they probably would’ve tried to void his contract. Now, in August, the Yankees are in a pennant race, Rodriguez has an OPS of .868 and 25 homers and, after he hit a grand slam with the Bombers down three in the seventh, he gets his own hashtag from Yankees Twitter. “#BAEROD”


What a weird six months it’s been.

Mets 5, Orioles 3: Jacob deGrom allowed one run and took a four-hitter into the eighth inning. Curtis Granderson hit two homers. If this was the 1980s they’d make some cheesy poster of them with the words “deGrom and deGrand” on it and they’d be wearing, I dunno, chef’s uniforms or something. And that’d be one of the more understated posters as far as those things went. I have such a hard time explaining the 1980s to my kids.

Blue Jays 8, Phillies 5: Josh Donaldson hit two home runs, one of which travelled about eleventy-seven thousand feet unto the upper deck in left field at CBP, where homers don’t often go. Now is probably a good time to remember that Billy Beane traded Donaldson away for largely non-baseball reasons. Guess that didn’t work out too well.

Angels 5, White Sox 3: Kole Calhoun and Albert Pujols homered in the first inning and the Angels never looked back. Well, it was close late so they were looking back a good bit. But it was only a glance or two. The sort of looking back you do when you try to see if you’re being followed but you don’t want it to look like you think you’re being followed. But really, if someone wants to follow you, there are better methods. As one of my cinematic heroes once said: “People know they’re being followed when they turn around and see someone following them. They can’t tell they’re being followed if you get there first.” There’s some wisdom there, friend.

Pirates 9, Diamondbacks 8: Pedro Florimon tripled home Francisco Cervelli with two outs in the bottom of the 15th to end this marathon. Pittsburgh had a five-run lead after seven innings but the Snakes came back with three in the eighth and two in the ninth. Those ninth innings runs were both the product of infield errors, so there are some infielders happy about the end of this one getting them off the hook.

Red Sox 9, Indians 1: It’s definitely been an eventful week in Boston. John Farrell’s cancer diagnosis, Dave Dombrowski getting hired and the Sox winning four of five. Travis Shaw went 4-for-4 and Brock Holt had three hits and two RBI. Trevor Bauer’s nightmare second half continues. He didn’t make it out of the second inning, having given up five runs on six hits.

Royals 3, Reds 1: It was 1-0 heading into the ninth when Ben Zobrist managed to hit a homer off of Aroldis Chapman, sending it on to extras. He was also part of the Royals’ two-run rally in the top of the thirteenth. The blown save was Chapman’s first one at home in 57 save opportunities, dating back to September 2012. Overall, sixteen pitchers combined to allow four runs — only three earned — in 26 innings, striking out 24. Welcome to baseball in 2015.

Tigers 10, Cubs 8: Ian Kinsler had five of the Tigers’ 19 hits, one of which was a homer in this wild one. A rain delay knocked out the starters in the third inning, which means the Tigers needed to depend on their relievers. And Detroit had a 6-2 lead heading into the fifth inning but blew it before rallying later. Brad Ausmus:

“Offensively the lineup did their part. We’ve just got to be better out of the bullpen.”

This is not a repeat from 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010 . . . .

Mariners 3, Rangers 2: Last time he pitched Hisashi Iwakuma tossed a no-hitter. It seems that whenever guys do that lately their next start — or next several starts — are lackluster. Not here. Iwakuma allowed two runs over seven and got the win. All of the M’s runs came in the first, including a Seth Smith homer.

Marlins 9, Brewers 6: Ichiro was 4-for-5 with two runs scored. It was his first four-hit game in two years. He now has 2,919 hits on his career, with 75 this year. If he says on his current pace he’ll likely get 20-25 more or so this season. It’s inevitable, then, that someone will give him a chance to break the 3,000-hit mark in the United States next season and it’s very likely that he’ll do it, one assumes. It’s just astounding when you realize that he didn’t start here until he was 27. And has 1,278 hits in Japan.

Astros 3, Rays 2: Marwin Gonzalez had three hits including a tenth inning walkoff homer. He also doubled in a run earlier. A.J. Hinch said that Gonzalez, normally a utility guy, gets to play again today. I’d say that’s only fair.

Giants 2, Cardinals 0: Ryan Vogelsong pitched six shutout innings, but he wasn’t the only Giants starting pitcher who played a role here. In the seventh inning Bruce Bochy used Bumgarner to pinch hit for Vogelsong, and he singled. Two walks and a hit-by-pitch later and he came in to score the Giants’ second run. Bumgarner homered in his last start. The Giants have three games at Oakland in late September. Maybe he should DH? The Giants have won six of eight.

Nationals 15, Rockies 6: Washington snaps its six-game skid. Yunel Escobar and Ian Desmond each drove in four. Bryce Harper walked four times. The Nats as a team walked ten times, including three times in a four-run eighth inning. A run scored that inning on a balk too. You’d think the Rockies had played in Colorado long enough to realize that you can’t get away with that sort of thing.

Athletics 5, Dodgers 4: Clayton Kershaw didn’t have his a-game, but he did allow only one run through seven innings and stood to be the winner after the Dodgers scored three in the top of the eighth. Then Pedro Baez gave those three runs back in the bottom of the eighth and Yimi Garcia allowed back-to-back doubles to Mark Canha and Billy Butler to lead off the tenth to let the A’s walk it off. In addition to scoring the winning run, Canha was 4-for-5 and drove in two.

Padres 9, Braves 0: Melvin Upton Jr. homered twice against the team who signed him to a $75 million deal before the 2013 season and who did jack squat for them while he played there. If you forfeit a game you lose 9-0 according to baseball rules. That may have been preferable to watching Upton hit two homers against the Braves. In fact I know it would’ve been.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

Hisahi Iwakuma

source: Getty Images

Mariners 3, Orioles 0: Hisashi Iwakuma with the no-no. He walked three and struck out seven. It’s been a not-great year for both Iwakuma and the M’s, but this will at least give them something to put on the highlight reel. You’ve probably seen the final out highlight a few times since yesterday, but don’t sleep on Kyle Seager’s sweet catch in foul territory in the ninth to keep things going:

Mets 3, Rockies 0: Midseason additions Juan Uribe and Yoenis Cespedes each knock in a run, Cespedes on a homer, and Jacob deGrom continues to be ridiculous, striking out 10 in seven innings. Question: did the Rockies even bring their bats to New York?

Indians 2, Yankees 1: The Yankees; offensive struggles continue, this time managing only one run against Danny Salazar and the Tribe. And with that New York falls out of first place in the AL East. Maybe, like the Nationals, they have a veteran on the team who thinks it’s actually better to be in second place. I sort of doubt it, but I didn’t think such a beast existed before yesterday, so who knows?

Blue Jays 10, Athletics 3: Ten straight wins for Toronto and that puts them in first place. Chris Colabello and Justin Smoak, each castoffs from other teams, went deep with three-run shots. Josh Donaldson, who the A’s figured would be cool to trade away, knocked in two more runs giving him 85 on the year. And R.A. Dickey pitched well, giving the Jays their sixteenth straight game in which their starter has allowed three or fewer earned runs. They have one more this afternoon against the A’s and then weekend they face the Yankees in Toronto. It’s gonna be nuts.

Marlins 14, Red Sox 6: The Fish put up a ten-run sixth inning during which rookie J.T. Realmuto drove in five all by himself. He drove in six runs overall on the day. All this from a guy whose name sounds like something a kid make up on the spot when caught by a security guard with a spray paint can or something.

“Hey, you! Put that can down! What’s your name, kid?”

“It’s um . . . J.T. . . uhhh . . .Re . . .al . . .muto.”

“No, wait a minute. I know your parents. You’re Beth and Ryan Hogard’s son. That’s it, I’m calling your father!”

“Aw, man.”

Meanwhile, David Ortiz hit two homers in a winning effort in a losing cause.

Astros 2, Giants 0: Five pitchers, led by Scott Feldman, combine to toss a five-hit shutout for the Astros. Chris Heston allowed a homer to Colby Rasmus but otherwise pitched well. Ya need help, though.

Phillies 7, Diamondbacks 6: Down by one, the Phillies put up a four-run sixth inning capped by a Cameron Rupp three-run homer. He also had a sac fly in the game giving him four RBI. Rupp also made a nice swipe tag on a play at the plate that went to replay review and was upheld. Here’s Dbacks manager Chip Hale after the call went against him:

“I thought he was safe. I guess it wasn’t enough evidence,” Hale said. “That’s what you always hear. That’s their excuse. Not enough evidence. That’s the way it goes.”

You mad, bro?  The Phillies avoid the sweep. 

Reds 7, Padres 3: Matt Kemp hit a first inning three-run homer, but that’s all the Padres would do. Joey Votto hit a two-run homer. He also scored on a balk by James Shields, who has not won in 13 starts. Only three years left on that $75 million deal.


Rays 9, Braves 6: The Braves blew a four-run lead in the seventh when the Rays put up a six-spot. Curt Casali hit a two-run homer that inning along with a James Loney RBI double and a Logan Forsythe sacrifice fly. There was also a wild pitch and some clownshoes Braves defense in the mix. Personally, I spent my evening watching the Perseid meteor shower. It was far more engaging.

Cardinals 4, Pirates 2: Michael Wacha beats Gerrit Cole, giving the former his 14th win and leaving the latter at 14 wins, which ties both of them with Felix Hernandez for tops in the game. This was the Yadier Molina show, though. He had an RBI triple thanks to a poor decision in the outfield by Gregory Polanco, who let the ball get by him. He also stole a dang base — third base! — and threw out Polanco trying to steal.

Cubs 3, Brewers 2: Assuming, as it often safe to assume, that a wild pitch is a joint failure of catcher and pitcher, Miguel Montero contributed to this one going to extra innings when a wild pitch went past him in the ninth to tie the score. But he atoned just fine, thanks, by hitting the walkoff homer for the Cubs sixth straight win and their 12th in 13 games. Chicago is only a game and a half behind Pittsburgh for second place in the Central and first place in the NL Wild Card race.

White Sox 3, Angels 2: Avisail Garcia doubled in Jose Abreu in the 13th for the walkoff win. There was some controversy here in the ninth inning when the Angels tied it up, though. Angels shortstop Erick Aybar struck out to lead off the ninth against Dave Robertson. The ball was in the dirt, so catcher Tyler Flowers reached out to tag Aybar on the leg and was called out, but Aybar still broke for first base. A replay challenge ensued on whether the tag was made. After the out was confirmed, Mike Scioscia came out to argue and/or get an explanation from the home plate umpire. As he did so, he stood in front of home plate. After the game Robertson, who went on to blow the save that inning and force extras, called the move “bush league” by Scioscia, claiming that he was delaying the game by arguing and implying that he did so in that exact spot to keep Robertson from getting loose during the replay delay. Scioscia denied it. Fun, fun times.

Tigers 7, Royals 4: Detroit rallied with a four-run eighth inning and added one more in the ninth. The rally started against Edinson Volquez, who Ned Yost left to begin the eighth inning rather than go to Kelvin Herrera. Herrera was eventually called upon and let a couple of inherited runners score. Defensible given where Volquez’s pitch count was, I suppose, and the Royals lead in the Central is so big that it kind of doesn’t matter I guess. It’s the kind of decision that Yost would be wise to avoid when the games matter a bit more in October.

Twins 11, Rangers 1: Miguel Sano homered twice as the Twins win in a laugher. Both of his shots were absolute rockets that went upper deck. They were almost as impressive as the Perseid meteor shower.

Dodgers 3, Nationals 0: Clayton Kershaw with eight strikeouts in eight shutout innings. He was perfect through six. He also crossed the 200-strikeout mark and it was only August 12. It’s his sixth straight year of 200Ks, which matches Koufax and Tom Seaver for the lead in that department in the National League. I assumed Nolan Ryan, like, doubled up on that at some point but even he never had six-straight 200K seasons. Which is sort of amazing to me, but that’s how streaks go I guess. And that’s how crazy consistent Kershaw has been.