Tag: J.C. Romero

World Baseball Classic - Semifinals - Puerto Rico v Japan

Nationals sign J.C. Romero to minor league deal


J.C. Romero’s work as a late-inning reliever for Puerto Rico in the World Baseball Classic convinced the Nationals to sign him to a minor-league contract.

Romero is 36 years old and allowed 13 runs in 12 innings for the Orioles and Cardinals last season. Overall since 2009 he’s thrown 90 total innings in the majors while allowing 161 baserunners, with 60 walks and 65 strikeouts.

Romero has bounced around an incredible amount during the past few years, pitching for four different teams in the majors and a handful of teams at Triple-A. In fact, in 2011 he signed a minor-league deal with the Nationals, pitched briefly at Triple-A, and was released.

Puerto Rico boots the U.S. out of the World Baseball Classic

Nelson Figueroa

Puerto Rico starter Nelson Figueroa was in top form in an elimination game tonight against the United States. The well-traveled right-hander tossed six shut-out innings, holding the opposition to four base runners on two hits, one walk, and one error. He was staked to an early 1-0 lead when Mike Aviles hit a two-out RBI single to right in the top of the first, setting the tone.

U.S. starter Ryan Vogelsong was otherwise solid through five and two-third innings, allowing one runner on a walk in the sixth before being taken out in favor of reliever Vinnie Pestano. It was not Pestano’s night. He immediately surrendered a single to Aviles, then walked Alex Rios to load the bases. No matter what he did, he could not find the strike zone. He walked Carlos Rivera to force in a run, bolstering Puerto Rico’s lead to 2-0. Andy Gonzalez put the exclamation point on the offensive surge with a two-out, two-run double to left, chasing Pestano in the process. Jeremy Affeldt came in to get the final out of the inning, but it was too late.

With Figueroa out of the game in the bottom of the seventh, the U.S. finally got on the board against reliever Giovanni Soto. Joe Mauer tripled with one out and was promptly plated on a Giancarlo Stanton single to left. Adam Jones struck out looking — on a questionable judgment by home plate umpire Mark Wegner, it should be noted — representing the tying run with runners on first and second and two outs to end the threat.

The U.S. wouldn’t go down without a fight. Against Jose De La Torre, the U.S. strung together three consecutive hits — two singles and a double — to bring the score to 4-2. Xavier Cedeno came in to relieve De La Torre and walked Joe Mauer before being quickly lifted. The right-handed Fernando Cabrera came on for the favorable platoon match-up against Stanton and got him to pop up, preventing any runner advancement. However, he then walked Zobrist to force in a run and bring the game to 4-3. Puerto Rico brought in its fourth pitcher of the inning, lefty J.C. Romero. Romero got Eric Hosmer to ground out, squelching the threat at long last.

Romero came back out for the ninth, striking out Adam Jones and Shane Victorino, and getting Jimmy Rollins to fly out to center field to seal the 4-3 victory for Puerto Rico.

With the loss, the U.S. is eliminated from the Classic. The win keeps Puerto Rico’s hopes alive as they will play the Dominican Republic at 1 PM EST tomorrow for the right to play the Netherlands in the semifinals at AT&T Park in San Francisco on March 18.

Puerto Rico defeats Venezuela, clinches second round berth

World Baseball Classic - Pool C - Puerto Rico v Venezuela

In World Baseball Classic Pool C action, Puerto Rico emerged victorious over Venezuela 6-3. Starters Carlos Zambrano for Venezuela and Nelson Figueroa for Puerto Rico matched, each allowing two runs in their respective 3.2 and 4-inning outings.

Venezuela got on the board first, scoring two in the bottom of the third inning. With one out, Omar Infante doubled, then was driven home when Marco Scutaro singled to left field. Later in the inning, with two outs and runners on first and second, Pablo Sandoval doubled to right scoring Scutaro. Asdrubal Cabrera attempted to score as well, but was thrown out at home.

Puerto Rico quickly responded in the top of the fourth. Angel Pagan led off with a double. However, he was quickly erased attempting to advance to third on a ground ball as first baseman Miguel Cabrera fired over to Sandoval for the tag. Zambrano began to get wild, walking Alex Rios to put runners on first and second. He then uncorked a wild pitch, allowing both runners to advance. He got Carlos Beltran to ground out to first for the second out, but walked Yadier Molina to load the bases, the final straw. Zambrano was replaced by reliever Enrique Gonzalez, who promptly allowed a single to Mike Aviles, scoring Irving Falu and Rios. The slow-moving Molina was thrown out at third base by center fielder Gerardo Parra, ending the inning.

The tie was broken by Puerto Rico in the top of the fifth against Henderson Alvarez. Martin Maldonado walked, advanced to second on a sacrifice bunt, then scored on a two-out RBI single to center by Pagan. Puerto Rico broke the game open in the eighth when Alvarez allowed the first two batters he faced to reach base, hitting Rios and a single to Beltran. Juan Rincon entered to try and put out the fire, but Molina singled to right to load the bases. Aviles then plated Rios with a sacrifice fly to center. Venezuela brought in Cesar Jimenez, who struck out Carlos Rivera, then called on Francisco “K-Rod” Rodriguez to get the final out. With a 3-1 count, Luis Figueroa doubled to right, scoring Beltran and Molina to extend the lead to three runs.

Venezuela was unable to mount any offensive threat between the fourth and eighth innings, but attempted a ninth-inning comeback against J.C. Romero. With one out, Salvador Perez and Martin Prado hit back-to-back doubles, bringing the score to 6-3. Fernando Cabrera relieved Romero and ended the threat, retiring Miguel Montero and Infante in the final frame.

Puerto Rico’s win clinches second round appearances for both themselves and the Dominican Republic as both teams are 2-0 while Venezuela and Spain sit at 0-2. Spain and Venezuela match up tomorrow at 12:30 PM ET. Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic will match up and play for seeding at 7:30 PM ET. The winner will play the runner-up of Pool D in the second round while the loser will play the winner of Pool D.

Baseball cannot, and will not, punish A-Rod any more than any other PED offender

Alex Rodriguez Getty

Tim Keown of ESPN suggests  that Bud Selig should drop the hammer on A-Rod so as to make an example out of him. In his words, to “make an honorary sacrifice” out of him. Among his suggestions:

… could A-Rod be suspended from the game long enough to effectively end his career? Just spitballing here, but could Selig make him the Pete Rose of PEDs and use A-Rod’s arrogant, repeated nose-thumbing of the best interests of the game to make him ineligible for the Hall of Fame? … If he has evidence, he can suspend Rodriguez — or, if you’d prefer, El Cacique — for 50 games or more.

No, he can’t. He can suspend him for 50 games. That’s it.

Yes, we know A-Rod admitted to past PED use in 2009, but he has never before tested positive under the Joint Drug Agreement nor has he previously been subject to discipline. There is nothing more crystal clear than the Joint Drug Agreement’s provision of a 50-game suspension for a first time offender under its auspices.  That is the discipline that Rodriguez is subject to if the allegations in the Miami New Times story are true, and that is the discipline he will receive. Any effort to do more than that will bring about a swift response from the union. It is a battle they would almost certainly win and win easily.

The only thing that makes A-Rod different from Freddy Galvis, Edinson Volquez, J.C. Romero or Dan Serafini is that (a) he makes a lot more money; and (b) a lot of people hate him.  That’s what’s motivating ideas like Keown’s here anyway.  A-Rod’s paycheck and unpoularity, however, does not change the terms of baseball’s Joint Drug Agreement. Please stop suggesting that it does.

Miguel Tejada is struggling at Triple-A for the Orioles

miguel tejada a's

Baltimore’s Triple-A roster is littered with big names and former big leaguers, including Miguel Tejada, Jamie Moyer, Lew Ford, Pat Neshek, J.C. Romero, Joel Pineiro, Bill Hall, and Nate McLouth.

Some of them, like Ford, are thriving as they try to make it back to the majors one last time, but the 38-year-old Tejada is struggling.

He’s yet to homer in 24 games and the former MVP is hitting .270 with a measly .625 OPS while playing third base. Tejada batted just .259 with a .660 OPS in 247 games as a part-timer for the Padres, Orioles, and Giants during the previous two seasons, so it seems pretty safe to say he’s finished.