Tag: INT

mark trumbo getty

Mark Trumbo “definitely in play” for a trade


Diamondbacks general manager Dave Stewart denied last week that he was looking to trade Mark Trumbo, but that doesn’t appear to be the case.

Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports says Trumbo is “definitely in play” at this week’s Winter Meetings and that the slugger was recently floated as part of a three-way trade that ultimately fell through.

Trumbo appeared in only 88 games this past season for Arizona because of a stress fracture in his left foot and wound up batting .235/.293/.415 with 14 home runs and 61 RBI. He’s owed a raise this winter in his second year of arbitration eligibility and the Diamondbacks will have a corner outfield logjam if Yasmany Tomas can’t pick up third base. Trumbo made $4.8 million in 2014, his first year of arbitration.

Diamondbacks ownership reportedly nixed a Miguel Montero-for-Andre Ethier trade

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From Ken Rosenthal’s latest at FOXSports.com …

Andre Ethier a Diamondback? Miguel Montero a Dodger?

The teams recently discussed a trade involving those players, but the deal collapsed when the D-Backs’ ownership declined to give final approval, according to major-league sources.

The Dodgers would have sent Ethier, catcher Tim Federowicz, and money to Arizona for Montero and multiple lower-level prospects. But the majority owner of the Diamondbacks, Ken Kendrick, ruled against the trade because he likes Montero and was not comfortable trading him within the National League West.

The Diamondbacks are pretty set with corner outfielders — see: Mark Trumbo, David Peralta, and Cuban defector Yasmany Tomas — so the swap didn’t make a ton of sense on paper. But it’s disconcerting for an owner to step in so strongly on a baseball decision. Kendrick is known for being overly meddlesome at times.

The Diamondbacks have no plans to trade Mark Trumbo

Mark Trumbo

After the Diamondbacks agreed to terms with Yasmany Tomas on a six-year, $68.5 million contract, there was immediate speculation that the club would consider trading slugger Mark Trumbo. However, Diamondbacks general manager Dave Stewart made it quite clear on Friday that he plans on keeping Trumbo around:

Trumbo’s first year in Arizona didn’t go as planned, as he missed some time with a foot injury while batting just .235/.293/.415 with 14 home runs and 61 RBI over 88 games. Stewart would be selling low if he traded him now. The Diamondbacks still have a potential log jam in their outfield, but they are planning on giving Tomas an opportunity to win the starting third base job in the spring. Some have even suggested that Tomas should begin 2015 in the minors.

Stewart also indicated yesterday that he’s not shopping catcher Miguel Montero, but Bob Nightengale of USA Today hears that a deal is still possible if the right offer comes along.

The Diamondbacks are going to give Yasmany Tomas a chance to win the third base job

yasmany tomas getty

This is . . . interesting:

What makes it interesting is this:

I guess it’s worth a try. In an era when offense is so hard to come by, trying to squeeze some more of it in at the expense of defense is not entirely crazy. But really, everything I’ve read about the guy suggests that the outfield may be tough enough for him long term, so this sort of sounds like optimistic offseason talk.

Yoan Moncada’s defection was . . . weird


Jorge Arangure of Vice Sports tells us the story — at least as much of the story as can be known at the moment — about Cuban infielder Yoan Moncada’s defection and the interim period he has spent in Guatemala in order to establish himself as a free agent. It involves an agent who isn’t really an agent, a baby registry, possible violations of the U.S. embargo, Scott Boras spies and armed guards patrolling the third base line. It’s must-read stuff.

It’s also the fact that a good portion of all of the weirdness involved here would be unnecessary if it weren’t for Major League Baseball’s rules which prevent Cuban players from establishing themselves as free agents from the safety of the United States as opposed to having them cool their heels in a way station like Guatemala.