Tag: Greg Holland

MINNEAPOLIS, MN- JUNE 09: Wade Davis #17 of the Kansas City Royals pitches against the Minnesota Twins on June 9, 2015 at Target Field in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Royals defeated the Twins 2-0. (Photo by Brace Hemmelgarn/Minnesota Twins/Getty Images)

Wade Davis gives up his first home run in nearly two years


Something very strange happened this afternoon, as Royals reliever Wade Davis gave up a solo home run to Blue Jays slugger Jose Bautista in the bottom of the eighth inning.

Context is obviously needed here and you’ll get it. Davis hadn’t allowed a home run since nearly two years ago on August 24, 2013. Appropriately enough, that was the last time he started a game. He came into Saturday’s outing having gone 125 2/3 innings over 123 relief appearances without giving up a home run.

Davis actually made a pretty nasty pitch, but Bautista managed to turn around on it for his second home run of the game. Watch below:

Bautista’s blast brought the Blue Jays within one run. They attempted to stage a rally against Royals closer Greg Holland in the bottom of the ninth, but ultimately fell short.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Kyle Schwarber

Cubs 5, Reds 4: Rookie Kyle Schwarber hit a two-run homer to tie it in the ninth inning and send it to extras and then, in the thirteenth, hit a solo homer to put the Cubs ahead for good. He’s also from Middletown Ohio, just up the road from Great American Ballpark, so this homecoming was really damn sweet. Or at least the second homecoming. A little over a week ago he was the MVP of the Future’s Game in the same park. The future is now for him, however. In his two stints in the bigs this season Schwarber is 16 for his first 39 with three homers, two doubles, a triple and ten driven in.

Mariners 11, Tigers 9: This was . . . bad. After the Tigers battled back from a 5-1 deficit and led 8-6, Neftali Feliz came into the game in the eighth inning and loaded the bases, threw a wild pitch and then, after loading the bases again on an intentional walk, gave up a pinch hit grand slam to Franklin Gutierrez. Worse: as Feliz was busy imploding, there was no one warming in the Tigers bullpen. After the game, Brad Ausmus was asked about it and said he had two guys left: Joakim Soria and Alex Wilson. He said he was saving Soria for the ninth — apparently the idea of him getting a four-out save or even coming in to put out a fire when the game was on the line was anathema to Ausmus — and he didn’t bring in Alex Wilson because, according to Ausmus, he was the only guy left who could go multiple innings and he was being saved for extras.

How one is such a slave to the three-out closer and how one saves another pitcher for extra innings when the game is being lost right in front of his damn eyes in the eighth is an utter mystery to me. As Leo Durocher once said, “you don’t save a pitcher for tomorrow. Tomorrow it may rain.” The “tomorrow” part of that applies to extra innings too, and “rain” can be considered metaphorical here.

Yankees 3, Orioles 2: Brendan Ryan hasn’t done a heck of a lot this year but he hit a tiebreaking RBI double in the sixth inning of this one. A-Rod had a sac fly and Chase Headley had an RBI double as well as the Yankees put another game between themselves and one of their division rivals.

Mets 7, Nationals 2: The Mets’ lineup finally came through, with pinch hitter Eric Campbell coming through with a big hit with runners on in the seventh and then the rest of the offense pouring it on late with four runs in the ninth. Jacob deGrom struck out eight and picked up his tenth win. He only threw 82 pitches n six innings and probably could’ve gone eight innings or the distance even, but Collins use of Campbell in that key moment of the game is the sort of thing one has to do when the offense has been struggling so much. Worked out nicely.

Rays 1, Phillies 0: Aaron Nola made his MLB debut and it was a nice one, allowing only one run on five hits over six innings, striking out six. Unfortunately for him he got no run support at all as Nathan Karns and five Rays relievers combined to shut out the Phillies. The only run in the game: Karns hitting a homer off of Nola. He is the first AL pitcher to homer in a game in four years.


Braves 4, Dodgers 3: AP wire story headline:


I guess you’re scrappy if you have almost no stuff — only 59 of Alex Wood’s 107 were strikes — and still win anyway. In Johnson’s case you’re scrappy if you spend the last few days demanding to be traded and then drive in a couple on a groundout and a single. Nominate them for the Heart and Hustle Award, I guess.

Cardinals 8, White Sox 5: Matt Holliday’s first homer since early May was a fourth inning grand slam that put the Cardinals up 7-0 and effectively ended the competitive portion of this game. Holliday singled and scored a run too. Prospect Stephen Piscotty made his major league debut for St. Louis as well and had an infield single and struck out twice.

Royals 3, Pirates 1: Jarrod Dyson hit a two-run single in the eighth inning and then came around to score on an Alcides Escobar single. The Pirates threatened in both the eighth and ninth, giving some scares to the usually dominant Wade Davis and Greg Holland, but each shook their way out of jams. This could be a World Series preview. Which would’ve been an insane thing to say just a couple of years ago.

Brewers 8, Indians 1:Matt Garza pitched six shutout innings in his return from the disabled list and Jean Segura — Jean Segura?! — hit a two-run homer. The Indians hit into three double plays.

Astros 8, Red Sox 3: Chris Carter was in an 0-for-20 slump before a single and then later hit a two-run homer. Carlos Correa drove in two. The Red Sox blew a 3-0 lead and have lost six straight.

Rangers 9, Rockies 0: Shin-Soo Choo hit for the cycle in this one, finished off with a leadoff triple in the ninth inning. He doubled in the second inning, homered in the fourth and singled in the fifth and finished with three RBI. Delino DeShields has four hits and fell a homer short of the cycle. Two in one game would’ve been trippy.

Marlins 3, Diamondbacks 0: Mat Latos could be traded before the deadline. If so, he just made himself look more attractive, tossing seven shutout innings and striking out seven. After the game he said “Right now I wear a Marlins uniform so I have to take care of business as a Marlin.” Our condolences to Latos and his family in this obviously difficult time.

Angels 7, Twins 0: Matt Shoemaker could lose his starting rotation gig when Jered Weaver returns from the disabled list. He’s trying to make that decision more difficult for Mike Scioscia, though, by doing things like striking out ten Twins in six shutout innings and allowing only two hits. Meanwhile, Chris Ianetta homered and drove in four on the night.

Blue Jays 7, Athletics 1: Russell Martin, Jose Bautista and Edwin Encarnacion each homered. Martin’s was a three-run shot. Mark Buehrle won his 11th, allowing one run and eight hits in seven innings. The game was a Buehrle Special too, lasting only two hours and thirty-eight minutes.

Giants 9, Padres 3: Chris Heston had a no-hitter going into the sixth inning and ended up allowing only that hit while pitching seven and a third. Hunter Pence, Brandon Crawford and Hector Sanchez all homered. Sanchez’s was a grand slam.

Big night for slugging catchers, no?

Video: Lorenzo Cain swats a 13th-inning homer to send the Royals to a win

Lorenzo Cain

Royals outfielder and AL All-Star Lorenzo Cain ended a nearly five-hour contest against the White Sox on Saturday when he drilled a solo home run off of reliever Dan Jennings in the 13th inning to break a 6-6 tie. Closer Greg Holland allowed two runs in the bottom of the ninth to blow his third save of the season, so he was one of many to see Cain come through at U.S. Cellular Field.

Cain finished 3-for-5 in the game, doubling and drawing two walks along with the homer. He now owns a stellar .322/.380/.507 triple-slash line with nine home runs, 44 RBI, 56 runs scored, and 17 stolen bases.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

Red Sox

Braves 4, Red Sox 2: Seven straight losses for the Red Sox, but hey, no one really expects you to win when Williams Perez is on the mound for the other team. “What’s the deal with that ‘s’ at the end of his first name?” the opposing hitters say, fearfully. “How can we possibly hit against a guy whose parents are so dismissive of generally-accepted naming conventions?” After the game Pablo Sandoval actually said this:

“We’re fighting. We’re not giving at-bats away . . . We’ve got a good team.”

All evidence points to the contrary.

Orioles 4, Phillies 0: Wei-Yin Chen was great, striking out nine in eight shutout innings. As the season has gone on, game stories from Phillies losses have made them sound more and more like some sort of service provider, traveling the country and helping pitchers who have lost their confidence to find it again. It’s almost noble. It’s like they’re saying “hey, we’re technically major league hitters. Dominate us for a while. Remember what that feels like. It feels good, doesn’t it? We’re happy to help. No go out there and be the best pitcher you can be! Oh, no. We will accept no payment. Helping you was payment enough.”

Pirates 11, White Sox 0: Francisco Liriano was fantastic, going eight innings allowing only two hits and fanning 12. People don’t say “fanning” enough for strikeouts. I feel like they used to say that a lot more than they do now. Sort of how like people used to write “Chisox” for the White Sox and “Bosox” for the Red Sox. I blame it all on unrestrained speculation and shorting going on at the increasingly unregulated New York Word Exchange. Bernie Sanders will straighten them out if we just give him the chance, man.

Tigers 6, Reds 0: Anibal Sanchez with a two-hit shutout and J.D. Martinez and Miguel Cabrera each with a couple driven in. Sanchez has now had two good starts after a couple of months of bad ones. And the Tigers have won six of eight. Scary moment in this one when Reds catcher Tucker Barnhart was on deck and Eugenio Suarez fouled a pitch back and hit him. Barnhart was unhurt, but I have always wondered when, not if, someone on deck was going to get smacked with a foul ball. Shocked we haven’t had more incidents like that.

Mets 4, Blue Jays 3: New York was down 3-2 in the 11th when the Mets rallied. Wilmer Flores had the walkoff hit which ended the Blue Jays’ 11-game winning streak. The Mets are now 35-30 on the season, 1 1/2 games ahead of the Nationals for first place in the National League East. Because . . .

Rays 6, Nationals 1: Erasmo Ramirez was shut out Washington for six innings and the Rays kept scratching out runs. Weird thing: Steven Souza walked five times but was stranded all five times. Tampa Bay won for the 12th time in 16 games to take a one-game lead in the AL East. Because . . .

Marlins 2, Yankees 1: Tom Koehler outdueled Masahiro Tanaka. Kohler allowed a Mark Teixeira homer, but that was it. Fun thing: A-Rod didn’t start due to there being no DH, but he came on to pinch hit in the ninth inning and got a huge ovation from his hometown Miami fans. I feel like the last time he got cheered on the road happened during the Clinton Administration. Oh well, just make him a player-manager, Jeff Loria. You know it’s a great idea.

Rangers 4, Dodgers 1: Rougned Odor had three hits, including a two-run single in his first game back after an over month-long demotion to the minors. Yovani Gallardo frustrated Dodgers hitters. How frustrated?

Royals 8, Brewers 5: The Royals were cruising and then put lights-out closer Greg Holland in the game despite having a six-run lead. He needed the work, you see. But he couldn’t close it out, allowing three runs on four hits and a walk. His ERA went from 1.76 to 3.52. The Royals still won, but this will sadly give fuel to the fire of people who insist on claiming that “save situations” are somehow different and more special and more magical than non-save situations and that a special breed of pitcher approaches them in a special sort of way and, my god, I hate that crap.

Astros 6, Rockies 3: Two homers for George Springer to go along with a couple of diving catches in the outfield. Colby Rasmus added a three-run homer. Carlos Correa had three hits.

Cardinals 3, Twins 2: John Lackey allowed two runs on five hits over eight innings and Mark Reynolds and Yadier Molina homered. Random from the AP game story: “Lackey said he missed Reynolds homer live because he was ‘in the bathroom.'” Good to know.

Diamondbacks 7, Angels 3: Robbie Ray allowed two hits over seven scoreless innings. No hits until after the fifth inning. The AP says that’s the third time in four days that a Dbacks starter held an opponent hitless through the first five innings. Luminaries all of them: Ray, Chase Anderson and Allen Webster.

Athletics 9, Padres 1: Stephen Vogt hit a grand slam and Jesse Hahn allowed only one run while pitching into the seventh, spoiling Dave Roberts’ managerial debut. Vogt had two other hits as well. He was 0-for-his-last-15 coming into the game.

Mariners 5, Giants 1: Kyle Seager hit a solo shot and Taijuan Walker struck out six in seven innings What an up-and-down season for San Francisco. The Giants have lost five in a row and nine straight at home.

Indians vs. Cubs: POSTPONED: See the sky about to rain,
broken clouds and rain.
Locomotive, pull the train,
whistle blowing
through my brain.
Signals curling on an open plain,
rolling down the track again.
See the sky about to rain.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Dodgers 11, Marlins 1: Andre Ethier went 5-for-5 with a homer and three RBI in this laugher. Although the Marlins had the highlight of the night. Hold on to you butts, my friends, and watch this drive:


Giants 8, Astros 1: Chris Heston tossed a two-hit complete game while striking out ten. Seeing a complete game from anyone who isn’t a thirtysomething frontline starter these days is sort of like seeing a double rainbow or the Shamrock Shake back at McDonalds or something.

White Sox 4, Brewers 2: Chris Sale had been suspended and thus had five days of rest instead of the usual four between starts. The extra day must’ve done him wonders as he struck out 11 brewers in eight innings of three-hit ball. In other news, “five-day” suspensions cause starting pitchers to, in reality, only be pushed back a day. May as well just do fines for starters instead of suspensions. The extra rest actually helped the guy here.

Royals 7, Rangers 6: The Royals took the lead in the ninth and handed it over to Greg Holland, who blew the save. Alex Gordon hit a homer in the 10th to give them the lead once again and it was once again handed over to Greg Holland and this time he locked it down. Well, got the win anyway, not the save. You can’t really blow the save then get the save. Statistics don’t work like that.

Cubs 6, Mets 1: Noah Syndergaard made his big league debut and it was not one he’s going to count among the best in his career, I don’t think. He started strong, matching zeroes with Jake Arrieta until the sixth inning when the Cubs hung four on him. Oh well, welcome to the big leagues, kid. Kris Bryant went 3-for-4 with a homer and a triple. The homer was a long one, but the triple was maybe more impressive, going the opposite way, farther than it should’ve given the swing he put on it. Guy just has crazy power:


Rays 4, Yankees 2: Chris Archer looked like he was going to get pummeled early, but managed to only give up two runs in a first inning when the first five men he faced reached base. Then the Rays rallied for two in the seventh and two in the eighth. Attendance was 10,417. Not even the Yankees can draw in Tampa Bay anymore.

Reds 4, Braves 3: Yesterday, when I tweeted about how I was heading down to Cincinnati to cover this game, someone on Twitter told me that I should ask Bryan Price why Devin Mesoraco  — who has been limited to pinch-hitting duties due to hip problems, thus leaving the Reds with, in effect, a 24-man roster — hasn’t been placed on the disabled list yet. It’s still a good question, but last night it was good for the Reds that he was around, given his pinch-hit walkoff double. The reason that was the winning run and not merely the tying run was because Braves starter Mike Foltynewicz threw away a ball while trying to get the lead runner on a sac bunt in the seventh rather than take the dang out the Reds were trying to give him. The lead runner scored the tying run. In other news, it’s harder than you think to not yell down at the field at the top of your lungs from the press box when the team you root for does something boneheaded.

Tigers 2, Twins 1: A walkoff bloop single for Ian Kinsler in the tenth, set up by an Anthony Gose double. Before that Alfredo Simon and Kyle Gibson dueled.

Pirates 7, Phillies 2: Four straight wins for the Pirates who you knew dang well weren’t going to scuffle along all year. And you knew Andrew McCutchen was going to right the ship too. Here he singled and hit a two-run homer to back A.J. Burnett, who allowed only one earned run in seven innings.

Blue Jays 10, Orioles 2: Edwin Encarnacion hit two homers. This is where I’d insert that “Nacho Libre” clip, but someone went and took it off of YouTube. Oh, there are a lot of them there still, but not the one that’s just ten seconds long with no pre-roll ad. Really, YouTube ads have killed the short video clip as insert comedy. This makes me way sadder than it should, because that was some comedy right there. Not as much comedy as the Orioles’ defense last night, but some good belly laughs.

Cardinals 8, Indians 3: A two-out three-run homer by Matt Holliday was just one of the many, many two-out RBI hits for the Cardinals. Indeed, all of their runs came on two-out hits. Indians pitchers: 66% is a failing grade no matter where you are. Lance Lynn shut the Tribe out for six innings, striking out 9.

Mariners 11, Padres 4: There was a time, not too long ago, when an M’s-Pads might not score 15 runs between them in a three game series. Here the ball flew out of Safeco, with Mike Zunino hitting two homers, Nelson Cruz hitting his league-leading 15th and the Mariners smacking six in all.

Athletics 9, Red Sox 2: Lots of blowouts out west last night, eh? The A’s snap their six-game losing streak thanks in part to Josh Reddick, who had four hits with a homer and three RBI. Eric Sogard drove in three himself, as Boston’s starting pitching continues to be a horror show.

Angels 5, Rockies 2: The Angels rallied for three in the eighth, thanks in part to Albert Pujols straight-up stealing second base and then coming around to score on a single. He reached base by snapping an 0-for-13 skid. But I’m sure no one was worried about that because, obviously, Pujols is all about his wheels and speed don’t slump. The Rockies have lost ten in a row. Which is some seriously special stuff.

Diamondbacks 14, Nationals 6: Two homers for Mark Trumbo, who drove in four. The Nationals had never given up 14 runs before. Not since they were the Expos, at least. Even if they and their fans like to pretend they were never the Expos.