Tag: Greg Dobbs

Greg Dobbs

Greg Dobbs signs with the Nationals


The Marlins released Greg Dobbs last week after a grand total of 13 plate appearances. This after signing him to a $1.7 million contract extension. What happened in those 13 plate appearances to change their mind on the guy so fast is a mystery, but Dobbs has a new home now:

Why the Nats even wanted him before 2013 is a mystery given that he’s hit hit.254 with a .299 on-base percentage and .361 slugging percentage in 568 games since 2009. But they got their bench bat a lot cheaper than the Marlins did.

Marlins release Greg Dobbs, flush away $1.7 million

New York Mets v Florida Marlins

Back in September the Marlins signed Greg Dobbs to a one-year, $1.7 million contract extension that had people like me shaking their heads and now today they released the 35-year-old bench bat.

Dobbs had a grand total of 13 plate appearances this season, which means the Marlins a) completely changed their opinion of him in what would be three games worth of playing time for a starting player, and b) paid him about $130,000 per plate appearance. Or maybe c) didn’t want him in the first place, but owner Jeffrey Loria loves him.

He’ll likely land elsewhere as a part-timer, but Dobbs hasn’t topped a .725 OPS since 2008 and has hit a combined .254 with a .299 on-base percentage and .361 slugging percentage in 568 games since 2009.

Releasing him makes plenty of sense. Giving him $1.7 million in September is the odd part.

Marlins sign Ty Wigginton to a minor league deal

Cincinnati Reds v St. Louis Cardinals

MLB.com’s Joe Frisaro reports that the Marlins have signed utilityman Ty Wigginton to a minor league deal with an invitation to spring training. Wigginton will be competing for a bench job. He can play first, second, and third, and even has experience in the outfield corners.

Wigginton was unproductive with the Cardinals last year, posting a .158/.238/.193 line in 63 trips to the plate. He has posted negative WAR in four out of the last five seasons, combining for -2.6, according to Baseball Reference. The only players less valuable than Wigginton, minimum 1,000 plate appearances since 2009, have been Yuniesky Betancourt (-6.5 WAR) and Greg Dobbs (-3.8).

Henderson Alvarez with the unlikeliest of no-hitters

Henderson Alvarez

Actually, it was prime no-hitter time: a meaningless game on the final day of the season. The opposing team had nothing to play for and thus started several backups. The umps were also looking to get things over with in a hurry. If there was ever a day for Henderson Alvarez to throw a no-no, this was it.

It was the ending that made this one unique. The Marlins, like the Tigers, couldn’t put a run on the board. At the end of 8 1/2 innings, Alvarez had his no-hitter ready to go, he just needed some help.

And if he didn’t get it, he was going back out for the 10th.

For Alvarez, it was his first start against an American League team since the Blue Jays traded him to Miami in the big Jose Reyes-Josh Johnson deal last winter. In 2012, he went 9-14 with a 4.85 ERA for the Blue Jays, allowing 216 hits in 187 1/3 innings. Rick Porcello was the only pitcher in the AL to give up more hits last year.

Alvarez, though, has found things quite a bit easier in the NL; he entered the day with a 3.94 ERA in 16 starts. His batting average against was down from .290 to .256. And today he was essentially facing an NL lineup. Miguel Cabrera, Victor Martinez, Torii Hunter and Austin Jackson were all on the bench. Opposing starter Justin Verlander actually came the closest of anyone to picking up a hit for the Tigers. Prince Fielder left after one at-bat.

Alvarez ended up getting 13 groundouts, four of them taken care of himself. The last of those, off the bat of Don Kelly in the ninth, may well have gotten into center field if not for an athletic play from Alvarez. It definitely helps having that fifth infielder out there.

After that, the Marlins finally did their part in the ninth. Giancarlo Stanton came out of his spikes in his first two swings against Luke Putkonen, then lined a single to center on his third try. Logan Morrison followed with a single back up the box, and both runners advanced on a wild pitch.

It looked like things might go wrong when Stanton froze on Adeiny Hechavarria’s one hopper that went past the pitcher to be handled by shortstop Jhonny Peralta. Stanton, perhaps thinking the pitcher would field it, froze at third. He should have gone regardless, given that there wasn’t going to be a double play either way. If Stanton had bee thrown out, it still would have left the winning run on third in the form of Morrison. And there’s a good chance that Stanton would have made it. As it was, the out was made at first.

The mistake wasn’t fatal. Chris Coghlan walked. Putkonen uncorked a wild pitch on his first offering to Greg Dobbs, allowing Stanton to score without a play. Alvarez was on deck at the time, even though with two outs and the bases loaded, there’s no way he could have hit in the inning. The wild pitch meant the Marlins didn’t face the awkward situation of mobbing the pitcher instead of the guy who delivered the game-winner.

Alvarez’s no-hitter was the fifth in Marlins history. He threw just 99 pitches, and it was clear that he would have come back out for the 10th. Conceivably, he could have turned in just the third no-hitter of 10 innings or more since 1916. The two previous were both thrown by Reds: Fred Toney in 1917 and Jim Maloney in 1965. That would have been pretty awesome, too, but the wild-pitch, walkoff no-no was memorable enough on its own.

So, the Marlins obviously have money to waste

Greg Dobbs

I realize it’s a footnote that the Marlins re-signed Greg Dobbs for $1.7 million earlier today. It probably doesn’t make much of a difference to anyone besides a few Marlins fans who are already so apathetic that it scarcely registered for more than a few minutes.

However, I don’t think this should be overlooked or forgotten. Paying Dobbs $1.2 million more than the minimum is an absurd waste of money, oddly perpetrated by one of the game’s cheapest owners.

The Marlins originally signed Dobbs to a minor league deal after the 2010 season that would pay him $600,000 if he made the club. Which he did, of course. After hitting .275/.311/.389 with eight homers in 411 at-bats in 2011, he was then given a two-year, $3 million extension.

Now Dobbs is finishing up his third year with the club. Overall, he’s hit .267/.310/.366 with 15 homers and 110 RBI in 966 at-bats. He’s best known as a pinch-hitter, but he started 84 games at third base for the Marlins in 2011, 96 games at various positions in 2012 and 47 games at first base this year. His defensive numbers at all of his positions are abysmal, so Baseball-Reference puts him at -2.5 WAR over the three years. The only position players worse during the span are Yuniesky Betancourt (-3.5) and Marlins teammate Chris Coghlan (-3.3).

And this has been Dobbs’ worst year of the three. He’s batting .229/.305/.301 in 236 at-bats. There’s no way any other team would want him on more than a minor league deal this winter. At 35, he’s obviously a worse bet than he was at 32, when the Marlins originally signed him to that non-guaranteed $600,000 deal.  Why is there any reason to give him more than that now?

It’s not as though $1.2 million was always inconsequential to the Marlins. Two years ago, they gave away right-handed reliever Burke Badenhop to the Rays rather than pay him $1 million-$1.2 million in arbitration. He’s gone on to post ERAs of 3.03 and 3.48 the last two years. Now the Marlins are just throwing away that kind of money.

I understand why the Marlins want to have someone like Dobbs. Young players shouldn’t waste away on the bench, and Dobbs will take his reserve role without complaint. But that’s hardly a good reason to give him a raise and pay him three times the minimum. So what if he’s good in the clubhouse if that’s all he’s really good at? If they had let the market dictate his worth, then they’d have some more to spend on someone useful.