Tag: giants


Juan Uribe “closing in on a three-year deal” with the Dodgers


According to Buster Olney of ESPN.com the Dodgers are “closing in on a three-year deal” with Juan Uribe and Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com reports that the contract is worth $21 million, which is remarkable for someone who had to settle for a minor-league contract in 2009 and then returned to the Giants on a one-year, $3.25 million deal this season.

Uribe didn’t have a particularly impressive season, hitting his usual .250 with a terrible on-base percentage and 20-homer power, but a player contributing a couple key hits on a World Series winner can make general managers do funny things.

He hit .266 with a .781 OPS in two seasons with the Giants, but prior to that he had a .718 career OPS that included a ghastly .295 on-base percentage.

Uribe is perhaps the heftiest shortstop in baseball history, but presumably the Dodgers plan to use him primarily at second base with Rafael Furcal around. That would mean not worrying so much about his glove declining during a contract that runs through his age-33 season–and could lead to the Dodgers non-tendering Ryan Theriot, which would be a good move–but Uribe’s bat is nothing special for a second baseman. His career OPS is essentially average for the position.

There’s a very good chance Ned Colletti and the Dodgers will regret this move.

Playoff shares: $318,000 for Giants, $246,000 for Rangers

Texas Rangers' Bengie Molina hits a two out three run home run as New York Yankees' Francisco Cervelli waits for the ball during the sixth inning during Game 4 of their Major League Baseball ALCS playoff series in New York
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MLB has announced the “postseason shares” for each of the playoff teams and the World Series-winning Giants lead the way at $317,631.29 per player, which is just slightly less than the MLB minimum salary for the entire season and some pretty nice change for a month’s work.

Rangers players will receive $246,279.55 apiece for their runner-up finish, while the team they knocked out of the playoffs in the first round, the Rays, will get $28,000 each.

Bengie Molina is likely in line for a “full share” from both the Giants and Rangers, which means he’ll take home an extra $563,910.84 or $43,377.75 per playoff game played.

Japanese infielder Tsuyoshi Nishioka “wants to play on the West Coast”

Tsuyoshi Nishioka

Later this week MLB teams are expected to bid on exclusive negotiating rights to Tsuyoshi Nishioka and Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times reports that the Japanese infielder “wants to play on the West Coast” and is mostly interested in the Dodgers, Giants, Diamondbacks, and Padres.

He won’t actually have a choice in the matter, as Nishioka will only be allowed to sign with whichever team submits the high bid to the Chiba Lotte Marines, but assuming MLB front offices have done their homework those four teams figure to be in the mix.

Hernandez writes that “the Dodgers are his preferred landing spot” and “are known to have scouted Nishioka.” Los Angeles has Rafael Furcal at shortstop, but could use Nishioka at second base if they non-tender Ryan Theriot before the arbitration deadline.

Earlier this week the A’s bid $17 million for the exclusive negotiating rights to Hisashi Iwakuma and now have 30 days to negotiate a contract with the Japanese right-hander.

What if nine teams hadn’t passed on Tim Lincecum in 2006?

Tim Lincecum pitches

Texas general manager Jon Daniels revealed during the World Series that the Rangers planned to take Tim Lincecum with the 12th pick in the 2006 draft, only to see the Giants snatch him up two spots ahead of them.

Of course, while the Rangers’ near-miss with Lincecum is interesting it’s worth noting that nine teams actually did pass on the reigning back-to-back Cy Young winner when he was coming out of the University of Washington.

Kevin Goldstein of Baseball Prospectus wrote a great article today looking back at the nine teams that decided not to draft Lincecum and the impact that decision has had on each team. In most cases passing on Lincecum was obviously a disaster, but for a couple teams it probably wasn’t so bad and for another team the situation is complicated enough that it’s tough to tell. For a whole lot more, check out Goldstein’s lengthy, interesting article.